Architectural heritage of Limerick

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Oct 16, 2009 9:45 pm

Landmark Church Building Gets €500,000 Makeover (Limerick Post)

Fundraising target well underway

A Church that has a very special relevance for many Limerick people, since it was built on O’Connell Avenue in 1904, is St Joseph’s, which has just launched its fundraising brochure – Preserving Our Place for Future Generations, and drive for a comprehensive restoration of the landmark building.

Spearheaded by Father Tom Mangan, administrator of St. Joseph’s Parish, conservation work commenced last year to correct weather damage to the structure and generally refurbish the church, which is Italian in design and built of limerick limestone.

As a protected structure, work will involve specific guidelines from the city conservation authorities, at in excess of €500,000 – so far over €221,000 has been raised thanks to the work of our parishioners and fundraising groups over the last two years.

Images below . . . . Fergal Clohessy, DerHur and Limerick Museum

History Of St. Joseph’s Church

St Joseph’s parish was founded in 1973 when it was split from St. Michael’s Parish.

St Joseph's church was built in 1904. It was originally used as a chapel of ease for St Michael's parish church. At the turn of the century, it was decided to build a new church to accommodate the growth of St Michael's parish. The architect of the church was Mr W E Corbett and the builders were John Ryan & Sons. Mr Byrnes gave the site for the church.

According to the original plan, the church would be built in two stages. The second stage was to begin when the money had been raised to finish the church. However, when the first stage was completed, the church did not look aesthetically pleasing and it was decided to borrow the remaining money to finish the church.

The church has acquired the nickname 'the church of the spite' ;) because it is situated across the road from the Jesuits' Church of the Sacred Heart. At the time of the building of St Joseph's, the then bishop, Bishop O'Dwyer objected to the Jesuits using a two-tier system for worshippers. The wealthy people sat at the front of the church while the ordinary people sat at the back. Despite attempts from Bishop O'Dwyer, the Jesuits refused to change this system and it was decided that a new church was needed which would not have this practice of separation.

For more information log on to link
Attachments
StJosephsMosaic.jpg
StJosephsMosaic.jpg (27.84 KiB) Viewed 8743 times
StJosephsToday.jpg
StJosephsToday.jpg (52.47 KiB) Viewed 8743 times
StJosephs1904.jpg
StJosephs1904.jpg (62.75 KiB) Viewed 8747 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:52 pm

Barrington’s Hospital

Feeney McMahon Architects have a proposal on their web site to extend the building vertically and also to create a new entrance wing. The original roof was taken down around 1933 and a modern flat one replaced it. Which was a pity, especially as the main five-bay building had a nice ornamental top (three rounded windows of an attic?). It would be amazing if they could reinstate that feature.

Although the hospital was erected in 1829, it was only completed in 2004 by the west wing extension (Healy & Partner Architects). Imagine Architect Frederick Darley would have had to wait 175 years to see his original plan finished.:)
Attachments
BarringtonsHospitalRoofProposal.jpg
BarringtonsHospitalRoofProposal.jpg (50.35 KiB) Viewed 8713 times
BarrQ10.JPG
BarrQ10.JPG (112.05 KiB) Viewed 8712 times
BarrQ20.JPG
BarrQ20.JPG (113.42 KiB) Viewed 8715 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:58 pm

Barrington’s Hospital ~ History Snippets

NIAH description / appraisal and images

History of Barrington's Hospital (Limerick Leader)

The Origins and Early Years of Barrington’s Hospital (Limerick City Library)

Refurbished Gas Lanterns (1985)

Images below Limerick City Museum
Attachments
BarringtonsHospitalBaalsBridge.jpg
BarringtonsHospitalBaalsBridge.jpg (211.25 KiB) Viewed 8718 times
BarringtonsHospitalCirca1900.jpg
BarringtonsHospitalCirca1900.jpg (227.84 KiB) Viewed 8717 times
BarringtonsHospitalPlan1829.jpg
BarringtonsHospitalPlan1829.jpg (66.46 KiB) Viewed 8718 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Mar 21, 2010 5:15 pm

Image

Mont de Piété

Mark Tierney described the Mont de Piété building in the Old Limerick Journal as being very picturesque, in classical style, on the lines of the temple of Vesta, with a cupola, pillars, railings and small grass enclosure.

He wrote of Mathew Barrington, whose family built Barrington Hospital, had taken a dislike to the growth of pawnbrokers in the city. He did his own piece of detective work by pawning articles at 25 different pawnbrokers on the 15th of Oct. 1836 and again on the 22nd. On hand of the ticket numbers he could estimate their dealings, i.e. each ticket charge was 1d each plus the exorbitant interest rates of 50%.

This exploitation especially of the poor, motivated the need for a charitable pawn office i.e. Mont de Piété. Unfortunately this enterprise failed and the building even became a liability for the hospital. It was later leased for a spell as a police barracks and remained unused in the 1880s. It was demolished in 1892. What a pity.

Limerick Museum ~ Limerick Journal ~ Mont de Piété

Wikipedia ~ Mont de Piété

Image
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Junior » Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:16 am

The Monte de Piete has lasted a lot longer than 1892 ,the Ionic columns of the colunade were bought by a wealthy New York merchant to adorn his mansion, also the rear wall of the Monte de Piete building facing Mary St. survived until 2006, unknown and unloved prior to redevelopment of the site.The accompanying pictures are from an article from the North Munster Antiquarian Journal 2007 detailing the excavation of the site which illustrate that a 30m length of 19th century wall belonging to the rear of the Monte de Piete was recorded prior to its destruction. I walked past it 100 times not knowing its significance.
Attachments
piete-wall.jpg
piete-wall.jpg (77.69 KiB) Viewed 8663 times
mont-de-piete.jpg
mont-de-piete.jpg (152.45 KiB) Viewed 8663 times
Junior
Member
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:36 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:28 pm

Roche’s Hanging Gardens

The recent published Irish Historic Towns Atlas on Limerick reveals how large these gardens once were. :cool: There are only two arches of this single-story store remaining. It’s been redeveloped with the old Post Office sorting buildings and it seems a little garden would reappear on it. Alas the project has stalled. See link.

Building of Limerick ~Judith Hill

City park and gardens

. . . . . . . That there was a lack of public gardens was not quite true, or was only recently true. Roche’s Hanging Gardens and Billy Carr’s garden were both celebrated and Roche’s garden at least seems to have been used by inhabitants and visitors.

It is illustrated in Fitzgerald and M’Gregor’s book on the city showing the strolling citizens and reported by O’Dowd as ‘a source of interest to strangers visiting the city’. The hanging gardens were unique, the product of a personal vision, or obsession. William Roche, the banker, was responsible.

He built a single-storey store or bonding house facing Henry Street (behind his bank on Georges Street) which he rented to the government and on the roof he constructed the gardens in a series of terraces. Exotic fruits and vegetables were grown under glass sustained by lead lined irrigation channels which carried excess water to the city sewers.

Only the brick and stone arches of the bonding stores, now incorporated into the post office buildings, remain today.


Image

Limerick Journal ~ Jim Kemmy

See pdf.

In 1808 William Roche built large stores which covered more than an acre of land from the rear of the bank to Henry
Street. On the roof of these stores he constructed his own private gardens.

The plan involved the building of the stores under a Series of arches ranging from 25 to 40 feet high. On top of these arches elevated terraced or "hanging" gardens were created and the whole structure was crowned with classical statues.

These works cost f 15,000 to complete but Roche's speculation was not the folly some people believed it to be. The
government rented the stores at a "fine" of f 10,000 and a rent of £300 a year.

The top terraces contained hot houses, conservatories, glass houses, and flues to heat them. Here was grown grapes,
pineapples, peaches, and oranges. The highest point was seventy feet above street level and commanded an impressive view of the Shannon.

On the middle tier were grown vegetables and hardy fruit trees; on the bottom, flowers. A section of about eighty feet
square was devoted to melons and cucumbers. Flights of steps led from one elevation to another.

The depth of earth on the gardens averaged about five feet, and the stores underneath were protected from dampness by flags cemented together and by an ingenious network of lead channels, which carried excess moisture through perpendicular pipes concealed in the arches and from the city by horizontal outlets to the main sewers under the street.

By the blocking of upright tubes !in dry weather, water was retained and conveyed into the various channels under the
garden surface. Manure was brought up from the ground by mechanical means. It was little wonder that the exotic gardens, with these elaborate heating and watering arrangements, were, to quote James Dowd, "long a source of interest to strangers visiting the city".
Attachments
RochesHangingGarden.jpg
RochesHangingGarden.jpg (76.73 KiB) Viewed 8625 times
RochesHangingGardenMap.jpg
RochesHangingGardenMap.jpg (74.19 KiB) Viewed 8625 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby brix26 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 5:25 pm

Pity looking at that map how limerick had such a great layout that's lost completely in the part of town!
brix26
Member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 4:56 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:46 am

brix26 wrote:Pity looking at that map how limerick had such a great layout that's lost completely in the part of town!


Though the grid street pattern is still very much retained, it’s their retail use on lower O’Connell Street (Map George Street) where the layout of these buildings have been radically changed. It seems the Georgian buildings with a flight of steps leading up to the front door have survived the best.

Take the last four buildings from the map above, exactly these four had no steps to their entrance thus making them attractive for retail use. Alas they are either replaced by a contemporary building or they get a shocking cheap purple facade or a large bill board mounted on to its side.

Image

Image
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby KeepAnEyeOnBob » Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:08 am

The end building there no longer has the girders around it, although I'm not entirely sure that the end wall is in fact vertical. The new building is pretty ugly but at least doesn't stand out too much (cream coloured like the end building and same height). It's been vacant ever since it was finished - don't see it being filled soon.

I think where one could genuinely despair is O'Connell Street between Brown Thomas and Arthur's Quay, plus Patrick Street (all the more with probably losing much of the remaining old buildings to a jumped up Arthur's Quay Mark II or even possibly nothing at all). Also Sarsfield Street, Liddy St., etc. Cruises street if you ask me is far more depressing than the rather shabby adjacent William Street. William Street has actually had improvement in a number of buildings (EBS, solicitors near Chapel Lane, occupancy of Williamscourt by Guineys, occupancy of some shop units further up by fashion outlets). Streetscape remodelling would do wonders for this street - it is *very* busy with shoppers regardless of the overall run down look or low quality shops.

As regards the city centre, I think the future is more east/southwards of the previous focus around those areas I mentioned. More future on William St., Thomas St., Catherine St., adjoining lanes, Bedford Row, O'Connell St further up, Roches St. Many of the specialised services/retailers people go to the city centre for are located on these streets.

I think all that it will do if the Opera Centre does eventually go ahead is pull business out of that surviving *genuine* city centre and into the wasteland I have mentioned, which will not offer a good city centre experience just with the advent of the Opera Centre. And the Opera Centre will not compete as a shopping mall with out of city locations. City shopping needs to focus on a city centre, not city shopping malls.
KeepAnEyeOnBob
Member
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:11 pm
Location: Limerick

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby KeepAnEyeOnBob » Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:46 pm

Saw this last week and thought I would take a photo or two for this site. It's a building at the top of William Street in Limerick, on the corner with Wickham Street. The tenant ("Baker's Basket") recently closed and the shop front rather than being left to rot was replaced with a basic new wooden one. I spotted from a passing bus a spot not covered by the new shopfront (but was by the old one) that had a date of 1789. Here is a close-up (admittedly cameraphone):

Image

It reads:
William
Street June, 2?
AD 1789

I don't think much is missing on the broken right edge except maybe a second digit on the date. Here's the front view of the building, sorry it's not great - it's a bit obtrusive taking photos on a busy street, so it was on-the-fly!

Image

The building looks especially ugly in grey pebble-dash with the cheap windows. I should have grabbed a photo of the side of the building, which is on Wickham Street. There are windows on this side too (shopfront on ground, more windows on 1st/2nd floors) and the roof profile is clearly visible on the gable. At the front it seems a bit odd that the windows are spaced over to the right (extra space on left hand side, even a bit more than shown here as you can see from the chopped streetname plate).

Anyway, probably not particularly interesting, but just a detail I thought I should record here!
KeepAnEyeOnBob
Member
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:11 pm
Location: Limerick

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:25 am

KeepAnEyeOnBob wrote:
Saw this last week and thought I would take a photo or two for this site. It's a building at the top of William Street in Limerick, on the corner with Wickham Street.

Image

It reads:
William
Street June, 2?
AD 1789


Image

Newtown Pery Map 1787 ~ John Ferrar (larger image)

Amazing what old buildings reveal. There is probably one for Wickham Street hidden under the plaster on the other side too.

Looking at the map, William Street was simply just called the new road two years before hand. Wickham Street, High Street and even the round house were built before 1787.
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:44 pm

Image Image Image

Granary Building ~ 53 Thomas Street (NIAH)

[INDENT]Attached corner-sited three-bay five-storey stone and brick former granary building, built c. 1870, with a ten-bay side elevation and a shopfront inserted at ground floor level. Hipped natural slate roof gabled to rear, with a gabled front and a moulded red brick corbelled cornice extending to the first three bays of the side elevation. [/INDENT]

Anybody know more about this design proposal from below?

Contemporary Arts Center ~ Design Proposal (Helena Michel and Adam Michel)

See links 1, 2, 3.
Attachments
ThomasStreetWarehouse1.jpg
ThomasStreetWarehouse1.jpg (37.86 KiB) Viewed 8464 times
ThomasStreetWarehouse2.jpg
ThomasStreetWarehouse2.jpg (45.98 KiB) Viewed 8465 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Junior » Tue Nov 15, 2011 7:49 pm

Just received an e-mail from the Thomond Archaeological and Historical Society regarding a forthcoming symposium on the future of the architectural heritage of Limerick city, details below. Hope it is well attended as it should be rather interesting.

Building Visions: A Symposium on Strategies for Preserving Limerick’s Heritage.

The History Society at Mary Immaculate College will host a symposium on November 25th entitled, Building Visions: A Symposium on Strategies for Preserving Limerick’s Heritage.

Speaking at what promises to be a most interesting event will be Dr. Hugh Maguire, Director, The Hunt Museum, Professor Merit Bulchoz of the School of Architecture UL and Mr Richard Tobin, Senior Planner, Limerick City Council (retd.). In addition there will be two short presentations regarding ongoing historical projects in the city followed by an open discussion between attendees, chaired by Dr Matthew Potter.

The Symposium, which is being funded by MISU and the History Department at MIC, will run from 9.30 – 16.00 on November 25th. Attendance is FREE but you need to register on the day - Registration begins at 9.15am.
Location Room SG1 in Summerville House [use Ashbourne Avenue entrance].
Further information available from limericksymposium2011@gmail.com
Junior
Member
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:36 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:21 pm

Exploring Georgian Limerick ~ Pat Dargan

This guide provides an overview of Georgian Limerick, its beginnings and emergence, its Baroque planning, its open spaces and classically inspired architecture. The individuals responsible for the developments are introduced, together with the forces that motivated them and the ideas and influences that inspired and guided them. What emerges is a picture of Limerick that may be new to many people, visitors and locals alike.

The History Press ISBN: 9781845887360

New book out next month.
Attachments
Exploring Georgian Limerick.jpg
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby pigtown » Thu May 17, 2012 11:31 pm

The old Golden Vale factory is up for sale. 2.57 hectares is a good chunk of land so close to the CBD. I wonder would it be possible to convert the stone factory to apartments? I think it would be a great place for large family apartments with good access to the Condell Rd. and the wet lands just across the road.
http://www.limerickpost.ie/index.php/navigation-mainmenu-30/local-news/4533-landmark-site-put-up-for-sale.html
http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=LI&regno=21512053
pigtown
Member
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:50 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby lukejr » Sun May 27, 2012 11:57 am

This site and old building would make a fabulous museum for Limerick City, think Tate Modern in London.
lukejr
Member
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:49 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sun May 27, 2012 10:17 pm

lukejr wrote:This site and old building would make a fabulous museum for Limerick City, think Tate Modern in London.


The Tate Modern actually contains many works of art that people want to see, which is I fear where your idea falls down. Limerick already has one good museum and one bullshit art gallery. It should focus on getting the basics right, like paving stones on its main street and decent preservation of its buildings.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 234
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby lukejr » Mon May 28, 2012 12:45 pm

Limerick needs a comprehensive plan that fixes the basics, but also plans something grand for the future, an iconic building to attract visitors and improve the brand of the city.

Look at what the Guggenheim Museum did for Bilbao, prior to the museum the city was run down with 25% unemployment. Now the museum alone gets 82,580 visitors per month - 1 million per year. King John's Castle gets only 30,000 visitors per year, less than one game at Thomond Park.

The Guggenheim museum and works (including a metro) and major city face lift cost €200 million. But it generates an extra 740,904 yearly overnight stays in hotels, at €69 a night that's €52 million in revenue per year just for hotel rooms. It would be an expensive outlay for the city, but it would benefit from it for years to come.

In my opinion there is no better way to preserve old buildings than to revitalise the city, and an international anchor museum or art gallery would be a an excellent start. Bilbao is a larger city than Limerick, so too is Manchester with their Imperial War Museum, or London with the Tate Modern, but we need to look at what other cities are doing. When a tourist comes to Limerick for a visit, how will they spend their day?
lukejr
Member
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:49 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby bjg » Mon May 28, 2012 2:04 pm

Your final question

When a tourist comes to Limerick for a visit, how will they spend their day?


is a good one, but the Guggenheim in Bilbao is not universally considered to be a good investment.

[url]http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/guggenheim-bilbao-and-‘hot-banana’[/url]

http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/09/23/travel/23bilbao.html?pagewanted=all

More to the point, if the hoteliers of Limerick want an extra €52 million in revenue, let them pay for the proposed museum or gallery. I can't imagine what could be used to fill it — or where the money would come from. Cheap, low-cost attractions may allow a hundred flowers to blossom, with more chance of success and less cost to failure.

bjg
bjg
Member
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:05 am

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby pigtown » Mon May 28, 2012 3:19 pm

one good museum and one bullshit art gallery

What's wrong with the art gallery?

The Guggenheim museum and works (including a metro) and major city face lift cost €200 million.

€200 million wouldn't get you very much in Ireland unfortunately.

I can't imagine what could be used to fill it

Maybe not suitable for an international city centre attraction but I've always thought that a Limerick War Musuem that chronicled the various sieges, Viking attacks and the Limerick Soviet would be a good attraction for the city. Also a tourist attraction modelled on the Eden project in Cornwall but about farming and food production instead of gardening could be popular. We are in the Golden Vale after all.

There have been calls for the university to donate their art collections to the city so maybe they could be housed in the factory. Nobody can see them in their current homes anyway.
pigtown
Member
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:50 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby bjg » Mon May 28, 2012 7:28 pm

I'd go along with the food idea, but all these small local squabbles are, I suggest, of little interest to international visitors. I don't understand why Killaloe persists in plugging Brian Ború. And how much of international interest is there in the UL art collection?

bjg
bjg
Member
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:05 am

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Tue May 29, 2012 12:27 pm

lukejr wrote:Limerick needs a comprehensive plan that fixes the basics, but also plans something grand for the future, an iconic building to attract visitors and improve the brand of the city.

Look at what the Guggenheim Museum did for Bilbao, prior to the museum the city was run down with 25% unemployment. Now the museum alone gets 82,580 visitors per month - 1 million per year. King John's Castle gets only 30,000 visitors per year, less than one game at Thomond Park.

The Guggenheim museum and works (including a metro) and major city face lift cost €200 million. But it generates an extra 740,904 yearly overnight stays in hotels, at €69 a night that's €52 million in revenue per year just for hotel rooms. It would be an expensive outlay for the city, but it would benefit from it for years to come.

In my opinion there is no better way to preserve old buildings than to revitalise the city, and an international anchor museum or art gallery would be a an excellent start. Bilbao is a larger city than Limerick, so too is Manchester with their Imperial War Museum, or London with the Tate Modern, but we need to look at what other cities are doing. When a tourist comes to Limerick for a visit, how will they spend their day?


That site is too far away from the centre to result in a revitalization of the centre. I'd be all in favour of something, anything, on the site of the old Dunnes building. In terms of tourism, we can either create a bullshit museum that nobody in reality wants to see, or we can make a decent attempt to restore a bit of medieval character to the area around King John's Castle and Nicholas Street. If we were to do so, we would have an attraction that no other city in Ireland has, and a unique selling point.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 234
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Tue May 29, 2012 12:36 pm

pigtown wrote:What's wrong with the art gallery?


Well there's nothing wrong with it, but it's not really a tourist attraction that the average person would want to visit. It doesn't have any famous paintings. It's a perfectly adequate and pleasant low-key space for local and lesser-known artists to display their work, for those who are interested. We don't need another one, which is what the person above's suggestion would amount to.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 234
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby lukejr » Tue May 29, 2012 1:28 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:the old Dunnes building


That would make a fabulous location for a public building or museum as it has a great view of the castle and with a river front too, there is lots of possibilities. I had hoped something would be done with it, but as far as I know it is still owned by Dunnes Stores.

bjg wrote:if the hoteliers of Limerick want an extra €52 million in revenue, let them pay for the proposed museum or gallery. I can't imagine what could be used to fill it — or where the money would come from. Cheap, low-cost attractions


You missed the point (neg attitude too), that was the lowest spend expected of a visitor, they'll spend money in shops, restaurants, transport. Cheap and cheerful, oh great, try and build an international tourist campaign around that. The Bilbao effect has been well documented, sure it has it's problems, but overall it gave the city a serious re-branding and increased tourist numbers significantly. Paying for, Municipal bonds could be an option.

International tourists! What do you visit when you go to a city for a weekend? Stay in a hotel, eat out and visit local attractions. In Limerick we have the following, please add if I've missed something:

    - King John's Castle
    - Treaty Stone
    - Hunt Museum
    - Thomond Park
    - Limerick Art Gallery
    - Frank McCourt Museum
    - UL (art gallery in concert hall)
    - Limerick City Museum

Maybe this thread should be moved, or a new thread started. But I like the discussion.
lukejr
Member
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:49 pm

Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby bjg » Tue May 29, 2012 5:52 pm

"You missed the point (neg attitude too), that was the lowest spend expected of a visitor, they'll spend money in shops, restaurants, transport."

Excellent. More people to contribute to the cost so the taxpayer won't have to pay for it. Perhaps the best thing would be to increase the commercial rates so that city businesses can pay for developments.

"In Limerick we have the following, please add if I've missed something: ...."

Those are things to do on a rainy day in Limerick when you've nothing better to do; none of them will attract folk to visit in the first place, because they're not very interesting or important.

You might find some support for your position in the study published by the Heritage Council today http://www.heritagecouncil.ie/fileadmin/user_upload/Press_Releases/PR_Launch_of_Historic_Environment_Report_29.5.12.pdf. That's a PDF of the press release; the document itself doesn't seem to be on the HC website yet. The point it doesn't answer is whether the return on investment in heritage tourism is better than that on reducing the national debt.

bjg
bjg
Member
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:05 am

PreviousNext

Return to Ireland