developments in cork

Re: developments in cork

Postby corcaighboy » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:11 pm

A park and ride would be critical as there is a large hinterland and people will certainly avail of the rail service - the stretch from Dunkettle into town is usually a mass tailback during the mornings. In addition, the premium on car parking spaces in the city is also an issue that would make the rail service more attractive. Although there are many housing developments nearby, they are relatively dispersed and unless there is a very comprehensive and frequent bus link, then park and ride is critical. Glounthaune is a good example of how a park and ride can be successful.
The real driver of traffic in my view would be bus links from Kent Station into the city center as it is still a long walk when raining (although the switch to the proposed Horgan's Quay entrance would negate this somewhat).
Finally, as someone who used the Glounthaune rail service on a daily basis, the addition of new railcars and an hourly service saw an upsurge in usage. In the bad old days, the train would often break down, not appear, be delayed...and of course if you missed the train, you would have a nice two hour plus wait for the next one! No wonder people only used the train as a last resort.
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Grand Parade/St. Patrick's Street Plan

Postby lexington » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:14 pm

jdivision wrote:Presuming An Post owns the building, I'm sure they'd be interested in taking a unit in the new centre plus a sizeable cash payment in return for the building, subject to planning. Think O'Donovan would be happy to do that too.


ewankennedy/jdivision - I certainly agree that inclusion of the Grand Parade post-office would be an considered addition to what is already amounting to be a landmark site. I am not aware if Mr. O'Donovan has or has not acquired the building in question, however, as far as I know - it is in private ownership, feel free to correct me if anyone has more insightful knowledge into that matter. One has to hand it to Mr. O'Donovan, he has been resilient and determined in his acquisitions and it has opened the prospect of a noteworthy project. What is known: Mr. O'Donovan has acquired sites at the Capitol Cineplex (which fronts Grand Parade and backs out onto Market Lane) from Mount Kennett Investments & John Costello for approx. €]Image[/URL]

*Apologies, if I excluded 57 Patrick's Street in the image above*

It would be nice to see the Central Shoe Stores frontage retained, along with the frontages onto Patrick's Street - with contemporary build encompassing the remainder of the site. Speculation has it that the scheme will contain a department store element to avail of a number of prospective parties understood to be circling options on the Cork market.
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Cork Metropolitan Rail Service

Interestingly in the EIS for the Midelton-Glounthane line is Cork County Council's proposed network of commuter and suburban rail services for the Metropolitan Cork area by 2020. It will be interesting to see if these materialise in such dynamic form. I, personally, remain a firm believer in strategy which reduces dependcies on vehicular traffic and in the provision of an efficient, clean and accessible public transport system within major urban areas. With Cork county population, under M1F2 scenario CSO projections (April 2005) for 2020/1 estimated to be well over 600,000 (where this figured is derived from the subtraction of Kerry population figure inclusion and represents a loose estimate) - surely such a system is warranted. The ability to deliver is questionable.

The first image is Cork County Council's own proposal for such a system:
Image

The 2nd is a possible alternative option I have simply messed about with:
Image

The primary variations here are related to the West Cork line - where the Macroom line originates at a city centre/south docklands station and proceeds along the South City Link to Black Ash P&R before skewing west toward Bishopstown/Wilton (where it goes underground) until it reaches the proposed Bandon Roundabout P&R - here, the line is divided heading west (blue) along the Ballincollig By-Pass to Ballincollig and Macroom, and south toward Bandon (grey).

From Black Ash, a line heading South via Cork Airport to Kinsale may also be provided (green)

Furthermore, the Docklands line (pink in the 2nd option) should utilise the existing corridor heading east and south east, currently serving as a walkway, toward Mahon Point/Jacob's Island, and head south across the Douglas Estuary serving Rochestown/Douglas (possible undergound), Grange, Donnybrook, Carrigaline and Ringaskiddy (it is my view this line is perhaps among the most important after the Midelton Line to implement - not only would it aim to serve the relocated Port of Cork facilities at Ringaskiddy, but also Carrigaline as Ireland's most car dependent commuter town).

The idea here is to utilise as many existing corridors as possible with the minimal amount of infastructural and visual disruption.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby daniel_7 » Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:38 pm

does anyone know what the hold up with the new schuh store on patrick st is and in general the vacent premises on patrick st?also anyone know how far off joe o donovans scheme is and whats the story with the grand parade hotel site?the library site along with this and the citi car park will make for a much better grand parade when all complete!anyone make any submissions to do with the south docks plan yet,like telling the city council to think outside the box with high rise elements and not to give us a shity bland quayside?
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Re: developments in cork

Postby PVC King » Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:49 pm

In public transport terms I think that Cork was ignored in the Transport 21 package essentially all it got was the reannouncement of the Midleton extension.

Given that Transport 21 is supposed to be a fifteen year programme certain projects that look marginal now will become more viable over the coming decade and if Luas has taught us anything these type of projects take close to 10 years to deliver.

There is no question in my mind that the South side of the City needs at least one if not two or three light rail routes if densities are to be tightened up. Given the contribution made by the City to the national economy at least a route to the airport and a start on the route to Bishopstown appears warranted.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby kite » Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:45 pm

[quote="daniel_7"]does anyone know what the hold up with the new schuh store on patrick st is and in general the vacent premises on patrick st?
:o
Vacancy levels on Patrick St. are up 23% since April 2005 according to the Cork Economic Monitor published by CCC May 2006. Very disappointing news indeed.
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Postby lexington » Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:58 pm

kite wrote:
daniel_7 wrote:does anyone know what the hold up with the new schuh store on patrick st is and in general the vacent premises on patrick st?
:o
Vacancy levels on Patrick St. are up 23% since April 2005 according to the Cork Economic Monitor published by CCC May 2006. Very disappointing news indeed.


The figure is distorted given a number of properties have been acquired as part of site assemblies (eg. Academy Street, Market Lane schemes) or organisational restructuring/consolidation (e.g. AIB, O2, Carphone Warehouse, Vodafone etc).

Schuh will commence works in the not too distant future; the former O2 store near the Savoy is under Final Offer; units fronting Patrick's Street (former Ryan's Pharmacy) was acquired by O'Callaghan Properties for their Saint Patrick's Street/Academy Street scheme; 55, 56 & 57 St. Patrick's Street were acquired for Joe O'Donovan's scheme - and are seeking short-term leases, however thats a tough trough to fill given most parties interested would be seeking longer term occupancies. To my mind, the former Bennetton/Diesel store near the Victoria Hotel is vacant - not wholly clear on its future.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby kite » Tue Jun 06, 2006 10:15 pm

[quote="lexington"]

The figure is distorted given a number of properties have been acquired as part of site assemblies (eg. Academy Street, Market Lane schemes) or organisational restructuring/consolidation (e.g. AIB, O2, Carphone Warehouse, Vodafone etc).

:o
I accept what you state regarding the site assembly on Patrick Street Lex, however given that CCC won the local authority of the year award, Patrick St. voted the “best” shopping street in Ireland and the millions spent on Patrick St + the years of disruption to traders it is disappointing to see so many shops empty??
Also the likes of O2, Carphone Warehouse, Vodafone etc are a blight on any Main Street in my opinion.
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Re: Grand Parade/St. Patrick's Street Plan

Postby Micko » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:23 am

lexington wrote:Cork Metropolitan Rail Service

Interestingly in the EIS for the Midelton-Glounthane line is Cork County Council's proposed network of commuter and suburban rail services for the Metropolitan Cork area by 2020. It will be interesting to see if these materialise in such dynamic form. I, personally, remain a firm believer in strategy which reduces dependcies on vehicular traffic and in the provision of an efficient, clean and accessible public transport system within major urban areas. With Cork county population, under M1F2 scenario CSO projections (April 2005) for 2020/1 estimated to be well over 600,000 (where this figured is derived from the subtraction of Kerry population figure inclusion and represents a loose estimate) - surely such a system is warranted. The ability to deliver is questionable.

The first image is Cork County Council's own proposal for such a system:
Image

The 2nd is a possible alternative option I have simply messed about with:
Image

The primary variations here are related to the West Cork line - where the Macroom line originates at a city centre/south docklands station and proceeds along the South City Link to Black Ash P&R before skewing west toward Bishopstown/Wilton (where it goes underground) until it reaches the proposed Bandon Roundabout P&R - here, the line is divided heading west (blue) along the Ballincollig By-Pass to Ballincollig and Macroom, and south toward Bandon (grey).




Lex, what's the liklihood of all these line extnesions and reopenig ever happening.

I'd imagine that there would be big problems with a Fermoy line as no previous line has ever existed. IIRC the Fermoy line came from Mallow.
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Postby lexington » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:41 am

Micko wrote:Lex, what's the liklihood of all these line extnesions and reopenig ever happening.

I'd imagine that there would be big problems with a Fermoy line as no previous line has ever existed. IIRC the Fermoy line came from Mallow.


Quite frankly, I don't really know. I think it will happen down the line (no pun intended) but its more a case of when. The fact is that the CASP and to a lesser extent LUTS strategies have laid the foundation for Cork city and county's development with the city at the region's core and the development of larger commuter towns satellite to the city at locations like Midleton, Monard, Carrigaline, Ballincollig (which is arguably a suburb at this stage) and so on. As these towns grow, the capacity of infastructure and consequently management capacity of commuter and domestic traffic will become excessively strained. This is evidently the case as it is. Although plans like the Cork City Development Plan 2004 did not specify the provision of an integrated light-rail network - its something quite evident in the minds of planners, essentially both Cork City Council and Cork County Council know its something the needs to be catered for as more roads are not the solution.

I think strong cases can be made for all such light-rail commuter links - particularly however the Carrigaline/Ringaskiddy line. I think you'll find the likes of the Port of Cork will champion such proposals - anything which will aid access and capacity to their new facilities at Ringaskiddy. Commuter wise, Carrigaline makes its own case. I think it will be important to develop any such line with strategic consideration for areas like the South Docklands, Mahon Point and Douglas.

Macroom-Ballincollig-Bandon Roundabout-Bishopstown-Docklands represents another strong case for light-rail provision.

The councils are aware of the need, as par their plans posted - the issue now is sanctioning swift strategy for attaining them. I don't believe any significantly appropriate lobby for such proposals has been enacted. Which is a shame - we all know how long it takes any proposal like this to get moving outside of Dublin, our public bodies such be pushing for this now and forcefully so if we are to even see a glimpse of movement in the future.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby Pug » Wed Jun 07, 2006 10:02 am

Thomond Park wrote:In public transport terms I think that Cork was ignored in the Transport 21 package essentially all it got was the reannouncement of the Midleton extension.
.


i agree completely on that one, its a disgrace. Only hope is, the plan was so bad and an election so near, it can be made an issue again. Some light relief at the moment given that the schools are off.

Anyone see a bbc program on English designer/architect/engineer Thomas Heatherwick last night? makes the current trends look prehistoric.
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*Updates*

Postby lexington » Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:31 am

:cool: Werdna Limited has submitted an Environmental Impact Study to An Bord Pleanala regarding its much delayed Water Street project. Murray O'Laoire Architects are handling the design of the proposal which is now not formally scheduled for decision until September 2006. The revised scheme has been watered down (no pun intended here either) to a proposal half of its original conception - the project now encompasses 231 residential units, of which 12 are terraced houses. Basement parking has been cut to 399 spaces over 2 decks the 3 western finger blocks now peak at 7-storeys and the eastern section now includes a significantly reduced 9-storey block, now reoriented east-to-west. Given that originally this scheme was proposed as an attractive 500 unit (approx.) development with landmark 26-storey tower, reached planning at 19-storeys and 400 units, was revised to 304 units with 17-storey tower and has now reached a meek (by comparison) 231 units with 9-storey "tower", it makes one think about the nature of our planning system.
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:o Alchemy Properties, the property development wing of Dairygold, is scheduled for a decision today (7th June 2006) on its application to demolish, clear and being preparatory works on its prime 8-acre site along the Kinsale Road. The former-CMP Dairies site, which ceased bottled production in 2001 and gradually closed its doors in recent times, is now being assessed by Alchemy Properties for a large-scale mixed development which has been the subject of discussion with Cork City Council planners. Approximately 1.5km for Cork city centre, the site is located within a stone's throw of 2 major Cork infastructural provisions - the South City Link Road and South Ring Road. It is also within easy access of Cork International Airport, the Black Ash Park & Ride and is directly across the road from Musgrave Park.

Alchemy, led by Dairygold director Michael Hogan, envision a landmark scheme of apartments, commercial and retail units and hotel/leisure uses with a strong emphasis on design. The site, speculatively, even has capacity for taller structures of up to 7 or 8-storeys, on its south/south-eastern areas. A formal application on the site is expected to be made before the year-end.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby jdivision » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:05 pm

kite wrote:
daniel_7 wrote:does anyone know what the hold up with the new schuh store on patrick st is and in general the vacent premises on patrick st?
:o
Vacancy levels on Patrick St. are up 23% since April 2005 according to the Cork Economic Monitor published by CCC May 2006. Very disappointing news indeed.


Lex and others have pointed out many of the reasons why vacancy levels have risen on the street but to my mind there remains another issue. Many of the units on Patrick St are no longer suitable for international retailers and the city council will have to begin to address this, be it through encouraging an amalgamation of the shops (such as in the O'Donovan scheme) or else recognising that the street needs to move in a new direction - such as indigenous boutiques or something similar. Whether they could ever afford the rent is something else!
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Re: developments in cork

Postby jungle » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:15 pm

lexington wrote:I think strong cases can be made for all such light-rail commuter links - particularly however the Carrigaline/Ringaskiddy line. I think you'll find the likes of the Port of Cork will champion such proposals - anything which will aid access and capacity to their new facilities at Ringaskiddy. Commuter wise, Carrigaline makes its own case. I think it will be important to develop any such line with strategic consideration for areas like the South Docklands, Mahon Point and Douglas.


Reopening the Cork-Passage-Carrigaline line could make sense for commuters, but not for freight. The line was a single track line and the embankments etc. were not designed to take full weight freight trains. If it were to be used for access to the Port of Cork facilities in Ringaskiddy, it would effectively mean rebuilding a new line on the old alignment. You'd never get such a line through Monkstown or Passage either, so it would need a large tunnel from Rochestown to Raffeen.

Reopening as a tramline would make a lot more sense. While there are many people who want to preserve the walkway through Mahon, I don't see it as a big issue. Most of the line runs through a deep cutting. It wouldn't be hard to put a roof on this to preserve the walkway. It could also mean that the walk wouldn't be such a dark forbidding place in twilight hours.

Still, the first priority in Cork city has to be a working bus service. There should be buses every 10 minutes along the principal routes 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 14. It should be possible to buy a ticket that allows you to use multiple buses. It should be possible to buy a day ticket. It should be possible to get buses to the airport from somewhere other than the bus station (e.g. extend the 6). Buses that terminate in the city centre - 4, 6, 9, 14 - should all terminate at the train station instead. Services shouldn't wait on Patrick St when they are operating a cross-city service. If we can't get this bit right (and it wouldn't even cost that much), there is no hope for light rail services.
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Postby lexington » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:23 pm

jdivision wrote:
Lex and others have pointed out many of the reasons why vacancy levels have risen on the street but to my mind there remains another issue. Many of the units on Patrick St are no longer suitable for international retailers and the city council will have to begin to address this, be it through encouraging an amalgamation of the shops (such as in the O'Donovan scheme) or else recognising that the street needs to move in a new direction - such as indigenous boutiques or something similar. Whether they could ever afford the rent is something else!


That is undoubtedly a major factor - the fact is the footprint of the stores on offer sometimes do not justify the per sq ft rent demands. Moreover, international retaillers generally seek larger, open-plan spaces which allow them greater flexibility and enhanced trading capacity. It is that sort of thinking that has fuelled the layout of retail units forming part of O'Callaghan Properties' Saint Patrick's Street (Academy Street) development.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

jungle - indeed you are correct, I was perhaps hinting more along the lines of rail in a people-rather-than-freight capacity. By access to the Port I suppose I was referring to generally linkage with the facility whether employee, visitors etc etc. Apologies if I structured my words poorly. :o
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Re: developments in cork

Postby corcaighboy » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:34 pm

Jungle - you make a good point about a rail connection to Ringaskiddy. A light rail/tram line is an ideal solution using the existing alignment as much as possible. Was just in a city in Northern China where they have extended some of the tram lines. The cost per mile was impresively low and the system works fine and was up and running in less than 4 months! Obviously not quite as advanced as the LUAS or similar systems but then again, it was not road based and thus signalling and other costs would be much lower. The trams themselves use lightweight bogies and have a capacity of around 50+.
The Port of Cork should really have bought the Marino Point NET/IFI complex when it was up for sale. Not only does it have a prominent position in the harbour and have existing berthing facilities with room for expansion, but it had a rail connection (to the Cobh line) as well. All container operations could have been moved from Tivoli to Marino Point. An opportunity missed.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby jdivision » Wed Jun 07, 2006 1:11 pm

From The Sunday Business Post last Sunday:
The South Infirmary Victoria and Mercy Hospital in Cork have held talks about a possible merger of the two facilities on a new site.

As part of the process, terms of reference on the future population make-up of Cork and Kerry - where most of the hospitals’ referrals come from - are due to be agreed at a meeting this week. This will affect the eventual decision.

‘‘For the past few months, we have had discussions on the future of both hospitals, and the Health Service Executive (HSE) has been very supportive of that,” said Gerard O’Callaghan, chief executive of the South Infirmary Victoria.

Both hospitals have development plans for their existing site.

‘‘For the long term, we felt it was right to look at building a larger hospital with better services,” he said. ‘‘We would end up with a more efficient model and benefits for all sides.”

A number of developers and private-equity managers are expected to show interest in the project. They would be likely to offer to build a new hospital for the amalgamated hospitals on an agreed site and, in return, would be free to develop the sites of the existing hospitals.

The South Infirmary Victoria occupies a prime site on the Old Blackrock Road, close to the city centre and St Finbar’s hospital.

It is a teaching hospital for University College Cork and caters for both public and private patients.

It has a total capacity of 255 beds and is the third-largest acute service provider in the Cork area.

It also operates the second-largest accident and emergency department in Cork, dealing with about 30,000 patients a year.

The Mercy Hospital is on Greenville Place in Cork city centre. It was founded in 1857 by the Sisters of Mercy. It also has strong ties with University College Cork.

It is a 354-bed acute general hospital, providing in-patient, day-patient, out-patient and accident and emergency services, and is the second-largest hospital in Cork, employing 1,000 people.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby kite » Wed Jun 07, 2006 1:18 pm

:) Lex, you referred to an upcoming aviation story some posts back, any updates on this?
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Re: developments in cork

Postby PVC King » Wed Jun 07, 2006 3:00 pm

The detailed level of analysis in the CASP plan illustrated here
Clearly displays that the projects are viable in the medium term; unfortunately we tend to get confused between the medium term and the long finger at times.
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Re: *Updates*

Postby POM » Wed Jun 07, 2006 6:24 pm

lexington wrote::cool: Werdna Limited has submitted an Environmental Impact Study to An Bord Pleanala regarding its much delayed Water Street project. Murray O'Laoire Architects are handling the design of the proposal which is now not formally scheduled for decision until September 2006. The revised scheme has been watered down (no pun intended here either) to a proposal half of its original conception - the project now encompasses 231 residential units, of which 12 are terraced houses. Basement parking has been cut to 399 spaces over 2 decks the 3 western finger blocks now peak at 7-storeys and the eastern section now includes a significantly reduced 9-storey block, now reoriented east-to-west. Given that originally this scheme was proposed as an attractive 500 unit (approx.) development with landmark 26-storey tower, reached planning at 19-storeys and 400 units, was revised to 304 units with 17-storey tower and has now reached a meek (by comparison) 231 units with 9-storey "tower", it makes one think about the nature of our planning system.
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There's something very disheartening about that. An opportunity lost? I wonder if the city council think that by permitting one tall building as a novelty shows them not to be anti highrise and allows them cut everything else down to a mundane pattern of 5 and 6-storeys? In some cases they even allow a 9 storey...although both cases of that to my mind were subpar in their design (Victoria Mills and the Metropole). Even the proposal for Clontarf Street seems to be under threat from height standardization. I agree that it would be nice to keep the majority of buildings patterned within the same height along the quays in this location, but surely certain locations like the Clontarf Street site and perhaps the front head of Custom House Quay warrant an allowance for something a little more adventurous? It seems anything proposal with a little imagination gets the cut to a point where they are no longer imaginative. Of course planners will undoubtedly refute this - the public will cite the height is equal to greed equation, but I account that as a lack of understanding. Height can be used to nicely shape a city. Rather than seeing height as a threat to the character of Cork, the real imagination lies in creating new dynamic districts and quarters (in areas like the docklands) which embrace new departures in design and forms, but in a distinctly Cork way. Imagination is allowing a city and its various districts evolve sustainably and respectfully, while seeing far enough into the future to consider the accommodation of new precedents. It would be saddened to think that Cork may waste some fine opportunities when they come its way. Like one poster said recently its amazing how some projects get thrashed in the planning process while those the are the real blight/potential blight on the city sometimes pass by unnoticed.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby gatsby » Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:09 pm

hey folks, i've been following this thread for some time now and the recent comments on rail developments have finally prompted me to post. its encouraging to read the opinions that present an optimistic view of the city and its future.

the idea of re-introducing light rail into cork is fascinating not only because it would have such a dramatic impact on city life but also because it is an obvious AND viable proposal.

If the rail lines were actually constructed and these proposals became a reality, then i feel the next stage would involve a two-pronged branding strategy that would aim to;

1) ensure consumer confidence that the service is Punctual, Frequent, Flexible and Clean. The affordability of travel would also be a significant factor but not necessarily a primary factor.
  • customers must have confidence that the train will be there (this isn't the No. 8 on tracks!)
  • as JUNGLE pointed out the customer should be able to use different modes of transport without different kinds of tickets or stations
  • Cleanliness is BIG, perhaps a bigger issue than people realise. you'll never get families or business people using it if its a grafitti-ed mess
  • Affordability of travel is important and there should be significant discounts for family passes and year long passes. costs per annum could be offset neatly by encouraging ALL people to buy a year long pass. like a gym membership many people will rarely, if ever, use it but we must sell them the idea that if they dont buy it they're missing out. Its their reliable back up!

2) create a lifestyle brand. that is that the integrated transport service is marketed as part of the new way of life in cork city.

  • This is the more interesting and long term aspect of the marketing approach. Its not about the morning and evening rush hours to and from the daily grind: its about people with lots of shopping bags meeting their friends for a coffee.
  • Its about business peole being taken home in comfortable surroundings (similar to an old Evening Herald TV ad)
  • An important point is that its not a new thing. In fact its tradition (ie the old trams of cork). so we're not talking about some hypermodern appendage transplanted onto the city but rather, "the trams are coming home".


Such a service deserves a name that respects the indepence and pride of cork people, so i would suggest that Cork Area Rapid Transport (CART) would be a mistake on many levels. This service requires a name far more distinctive and ambitious. Although the proposed service is of a light rail type, i would propose the title:
[align=center]The Cork Metro[/align]

or as the campaign would market it as:
[align=center]"The Comet"[/align]

The tagline would be "Catch the Comet" and could be promoted prior to introduction in faux cinema trailers. (eg coming 2010, Catch the Comet)


Maybe it seems i'm getting carried away with the whole idea but i think that its important to publicise and discuss these ideas now. Even if people begin to whisper that an integrated transport system in Cork is viable, then that is enough. Ideas will gather moment and and the abstract will shift to the practical.Crucially, why i decided to make this post was because i dont believe that the marketing stage necessarily comes after the design stage. If we can believe that this system is viable and if we continue to publicise that belief then it will become reality.

i think what you guys do on this thread and the other cork threads is fantastic and it will eventually bear fruit.

keep it up!!
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Re: developments in cork

Postby kite » Wed Jun 07, 2006 10:36 pm

:eek: The group that bought the Top Car premises on Victoria Cross have, following the ABP decision to allow the Dennehy’s Heating and Plumbing (Frinailla) development go ahead, approached residents living on Orchard Road to sell their houses to assemble a bigger footprint in the area, one resident has already signed contracts to sell, another is due to sign on Friday, others are considering offers.
I’m all for development in this area (Victoria Mills 1&2excluded) but I feel that encroaching on residential areas in this manner is wrong, the CSD group will have a field day with this news.
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Cork Projects Receipient at RIAI 2006 Irish Architecture Awards

Postby lexington » Thu Jun 08, 2006 3:22 am

:o Two Cork projects received awards at the RIAI's 2006 Irish Architecture Awards at a ceremony in Dublin City Council’s Civic Offices held last night (Wednesday, 7th June 2006).

The Best Conservation/Restoration Project Award was bestowed on Jack Coughlan Associates for their work on the Lifetime Lab project along the Lee Road:

The Lifetime Lab project was initiated by Cork City Council on the site of the old Lee Road Waterworks and is described as being a mix inclusive of a"modern interactive exhibition centre, themed playground - all within beautifully restored buildings and equipment with scenic views over the River Lee.

The old Cork City Waterworks was responsible for supplying water to the city of Cork over the past 3 centuries. The Waterworks is the best-preserved of its kind in Ireland. The old buildings and machinery have been carefully restored and are now being used to tell the story of how water was supplied to Cork City in the past.

The other Cork winner was Reddy O'Riordan Staehli Architects for their work on the new Maternity Wing at Cork University Hospital.
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Aer Lingus Announce 3 New Routes

Aer Lingus are to add yet again to their successful Continental European network from Cork following what the company describes as overwhelming demand and interest.

Flights to Lanzarote (twice weekly), Madrid and Prague (both 3 times weekly) will commence operation in October following the basing of a further Airbus A320 at Cork Airport. The Prague flight is aimed notably in competition with the popular route already provided 6 times weekly by CSA Czech Airlines.

Summer services from Cork to Berlin, Birmingham, Tenerife and Faro will now also operate year-round following their success.
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kite - I believe that's the O'Brien family at work in Victoria Cross.
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Re: developments in cork

Postby Pug » Thu Jun 08, 2006 10:45 am

[quote="gatsby"]
the idea of re-introducing light rail into cork is fascinating not only because it would have such a dramatic impact on city life but also because it is an obvious AND viable proposal.

If the rail lines were actually constructed and these proposals became a reality, then i feel the next stage would involve a two-pronged branding strategy that would aim to]

I think this deserves a thread of its own, not because I think it doesnt fit here but because I think people have so much to say about transport issues in cork and the distinct lack thereof, that it would generate a whole new discussion - the site is superb for getting people animated about buildings with relevant and decent opinions from all so why not do it for the transport in Cork?

Some sort of light rail/metro is absolutely VITAL for cork. We need our own transport plan instead of that Transport 21 rubbish. The CSAP set out the plans for transport links but the frustrating thing is there is never any action on it. In Examiner today, the NRA has cancelled the funding for the sarsfield and bandon rd flyovers - thats simply beggars belief as all the traffic from the kinsale rd will just mve on down there. The removal of Martin Cullen from office is also vital if anything is to get done. Stick Michael Martin in there and we might have some slim chance, not because I have anything to do with FF but because Cork needs some sort of senior representation in the Dail.

Its whispered that B Crowley withdrew his plans for the 6 storey office in hanover st?
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Re: developments in cork

Postby PVC King » Thu Jun 08, 2006 11:27 am

I agree this thread is fast running out of space which to be honest is a little like the roads.
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Re: Light rail / Trams for Cork

Postby browser » Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:44 pm

I agree entirely with PUG and Thomand Park - lets get a separate thread for this, if for no other reason than it will allow all the site's visitors to note that this is an issue that is live and is being debated. As things stand only those who look at the cork thread (mainly Cork people) will read these posts.

Also great news re new flights from Cork, credit where it is due to Aer Lingus.
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