Mud Room Variations

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Mud Room Variations

Postby teak » Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:19 pm

Can anyone direct me towards a source of design ideas for mud rooms ?

For those who haven't heard the phrase, this is a small room adjacent to a
(usually rear) entrance where people can take off their dirty boots, wet coats,
leggings, etc prior to going into the main house.

I'd expect mud rooms to be a commonly seen part of many rural house in Canada.
Despite the obvious application for them in Irish country houses I do not see many
examples of them.
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Re: Mud Room Variations

Postby Paul Clerkin » Fri Sep 24, 2010 2:06 pm

Common part of new suburban canadian homes too - usually have a set of open lockers for coats hats boots etc - usually a bench to sit and pull off boots - some have direct entry into laundry room too
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Re: Mud Room Variations

Postby L1 » Fri Sep 24, 2010 11:26 pm

There is an interesting thing called the "three seasons room" it is single glazed barely insulated and used only in three seasons. Keeps the mosquitos out, you can still be 'in' the garden, (can be used as the mudroom, as its on the way in). What I really like about it is that Canadian climate is dry enough and temperature equalizes so there's no condensation.
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Re: Mud Room Variations

Postby teak » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:57 pm

The trouble with most of these web-based design guides is that they are more about modern
adaptations of traditional features, many geared more towards suburban living than with the
design of country houses.
Books -- moreover recently published ones -- likewise.
Looks like I'll have to get someone on the case in Canada.
Might be interesting to see how Ontarian vernacular might differ from Québecois on this thing.
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Re: Mud Room Variations

Postby Glenn » Tue Oct 12, 2010 3:41 pm

Believe it or not, I never heard the phrase "mudroom" until I moved to Manitoba. I believe that the phrase is rural or Prairie in nature.

In Ontario, we always referred to this as the "back porch" (if it had a chair or bench to actually sit down and take off outside articles of clothing) or the "back hall" or "back door" (no place to actually sit down, but at the very least, a large rug or piece of carpet to kick off and put those wet articles).

If one had a big front entrance/foyer/entryway, it is conceivable that they may put a seating area there, but, typically the front door of the house was seen as where one would receive formal or infrequent guests, while the occupants of the house and close friends would usually use the back door.

It is not unusual to place anything from a basic chair or bench by either entrance, but articles of furniture such as a deacon's bench is what most people strive for. I have even seen situations where people have used small church pews, recycled when a house of worship is torn down.

Typically, the large (comparatively speaking) back porch area is typical of the rural farm house. I have not seen examples of "open lockers" as alluded to by Paul, but I have seen rows of coat hooks or pegs up on one wall where outer garments can be hung. To have one's laundry room off the back porch would be genius where layout is concerned. Actually, some back porches are big enough to locate the washer and dryer directly in them.

My father, when he renovated his house, had a big back entryway with a row of coat pegs up on the wall directly opposite the door; beside this was a French door into the kitchen, and to the left was another door that led into a bathroom (which one could walk through into my parents' bedroom, which also had a door beside this that led from the bedroom back into the kitchen). The beauty of this arrangement was that in the summer, one could come in from doing yardwork outside and take a shower without walking through the whole house.

L1 mentions the "Three Seasons Room", which in most cases is something added to the back of an existing house (although they may be a feature of a newly-built home, also). They are mainly a lot of windows, some of which may be opened to catch summer breezes (they have screen on them to keep insects out), and I have heard of cases where people have actually added electric baseboard heat so that they can also use them in the winter. I'll try to find some pictures of these.
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Re: Mud Room Variations

Postby teak » Mon Oct 25, 2010 12:32 pm

Thanks.

What I'd really like to get my hands on is a book or (more likely) a thesis
on the elements of real (not the Lloyd-Wright idea of prairie homes)
prairie houses through USA and Canada.
I know that many of the later houses were built from mail-order plans from
Sears-Roebuck and such like.
But these plans must have evolved from the original log-walled houses
made by pioneer settlers, the design and definition of the various areas
evolving in parallel.
If anyone has any references, I'd appreciate them.
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Re: Mud Room Variations

Postby Paul Clerkin » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:17 pm

I'd in Canada at the moment, so i'll take a camera around this area some morning soon - showing the variety of the porches and house types
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