is architecture a maths or physics based course?

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is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby acousticer » Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:53 pm

hi! so I'm currently thinking about choosing architecture as my career choice,preferably in UCD.

However,is it true that the course involves a lot of maths and physics, or would you need to be doing these subjects for the leaving cert in order to be able to keep up with the course?
I am in 5th year now and dropped down to pass maths after 1year of honours, and i don't do physics!

plz reply.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby spoil_sport » Tue Nov 04, 2008 1:29 am

No definitely not, there is some general physics in the first year and structures in second + third year get pretty technical, but a lot of it is unnecessary, and you will pick up what you need and the rest will be forgotten about. While the course format has changed somewhat since I started, the emphasis is still very much on the design work.
Oh should I mention there are no jobs? Possibly something more important to think about than maths or physics.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby Paul Clerkin » Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:05 am

the common career advice is that you shouldnt pick a course because of the job situation - it can have completely changed by the time you are finished
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby spoil_sport » Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:43 am

Fair point Paul, when I a considering architecture first, UCD boasted a near 100% employment rate amongst graduates, and now look at it. It is in reality a 6 year course and it is entirely possible that it could swing back.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby Blisterman » Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:35 pm

Well, when I first started, I was shocked at how much art and philosophy was incorporated in the course. Both things I knew very little about.

Maths and Physics? Not so much. If you can handle ordinary level leaving cert maths, you should be grand.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby parka » Tue Nov 04, 2008 5:27 pm

Creativity is the key.

Maths / physics leave that to the engineers ;)
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby acousticer » Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:19 pm

thanks for the advice guys!

architecture is always something I've had in mind to do though anyway and I am very interested in the field of design etc....,preety much the only course I would like to do!

Spoil_sport - But are you saying that there is no jobs IN IRELAND for architecture at the moment?Would you be more likely to find more opportunities abroad if this is the case?And is there not a chance that employment could rise by the time I have my 5 year course done!
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby spoil_sport » Tue Nov 04, 2008 10:36 pm

Perhaps my comment was misleading and unhelpful. To paraphrase the president of the RIAI, Sean O'Laoire: unlike previous recessions where we could emigrate to the next honey pot, this is a global recession, there is no where to hide.
There are no jobs in Ireland; look at some other threads, apparently the six biggest firms in Dublin have left over 400 people go between them, and I know that many of the small-medium design-led practices have also downsized. From experience of people I know, there isn't much in the UK, Europe or America either. Last year, pre olympics, China was a big buzz word, but of late that too has proved fallable. Of course some may consider Dubai an option, and is the subject of another thread, while there are those who will disagree with me, there is nothing of any architectural credibility happening there, and as such is not an option for me, but it is an question of how much pride you carry in your work.
However, none of the above is reason not to choose architeture, while in Ireland architecture and the construction industry have been the worst and most immediately hit, almost all sectors are in trouble, so the same warning applies to any career choice. My knowledge of ecomomice and finance is remedial at best, and of course it could all turn around next year, and certinally, 6 years (5+ 1year work experience/ travel) is a bloody long time.
I hate to be so negative but it is just the mood at the moment. The bottom line is, if you want to do architecture then do it, and don't let math, physics or shite-hawks like me put you off.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby acousticer » Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:37 pm

alright thanks man, i can see where your coming from though and hopefully it will change in the coming years if it's as bad as you say.

I still think I will try for architecture in UCD despite your comments, but i have taken your opinion into consideration.
Do you know anything about UCD's course that could prepare me further......like, is there a better course i should be looking for.......or do i need a portfolio/would a portfolio give me a better chance of securing a spot in the course?
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby spoil_sport » Wed Nov 05, 2008 12:34 am

My experience is only of UCD, however I have heard nothing but good things about Limerick, some of the tutors were previously in UCD and I have huge respect for them.
However the fact is that UCD is currently the only school in the republic approved by the RIBA which gives a UCD degree an advantage overseas.
It also has the best library + workshop facilites (in Ireland)
No UCD is not portfolio based, CAO points only, but that's not to say you shouldn't prepare by reading, drawing, photography etc.
In my experience the DIT exam/portfolio system is flawed, and not doing well in that is no reflection on your potential.
I can only say be open minded, most people find it is not what they were expecting.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby acousticer » Wed Nov 05, 2008 7:54 pm

ok thanks,you've been a great help!it's just good to hear from someone who has been through it all and knows what they're talking about.

I am planning to do art for my Leaving Cert also, so hopefully that might help me to gain enough points required and keep me in touch with drawing etc.... aswell.

thanks again man
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby experiMental » Sat Nov 08, 2008 12:18 am

parka wrote:Creativity is the key.

Maths / physics leave that to the engineers ;)


Engineers are jsut as creative in their work as architects are, but in a slightly different way. Creativity in architecture can lead you anywhere, even to working around building regulations, tight deadlines and other constraints like that.

Don't mind the recession, if you want to do something and not be a slacker, definitely go for architecture! :D
Secondary school teaches you nothing compared to a hugely varied educational experience of getting an architecture degree. An experience like that will toughen you up for life and will give you more self control and motivation.
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Re: is architecture a maths or physics based course?

Postby acousticer » Sat Nov 08, 2008 4:19 pm

thanks for the advice!:D
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