cathedrals of the united states

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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby fgordon » Mon Feb 13, 2006 10:12 pm

A nice (or horrifying) illustration of the loss of the Catholic conception of the liturgy is found in the recent "restoration" of Blessed Sacrament Cathedral in Detroit. Here we see the typical approach to liturgy as "show" - thus, santuray as stage, overillumination, eye-catching back-drops, shiny materials, dias altar. In a word the opposite of "worship as an objective fact".

See - and be amazed!
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby fgordon » Mon Feb 13, 2006 10:20 pm

If one thinks of that scene from "Planet of the Apes": the time-travellers discover underground the remains of New York - and there in a transfigured shell of St Patrick's the clinically dressed survivors worship a retro 1950s A-bomb. I think the new Detroit Cathedral is certainly based on that scene!!

Below, a perfect illustration of the sanctuary as stage approach - does somebody stand in the wings to prompt? Do they sell popcorn during the performance? Do the lights dip and dim for the soliloquies? Is there a balcony scene? Well, this is certainly NOT “worship as an objective fact”. I don’t know if it constitutes worship in any way, except the mutual adoration of priest and congregation one for the other. “Now we see in a mirror darkly…”
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Luzarches » Tue Feb 14, 2006 2:57 am

fgordon,

Have you seen this one from the cathedral-basilica of Covington in Kentucky. Has this appeared on the thread before? Apologies if yes. This is a bizarely two-headed scheme (file under pointlessly conservative reorderings): From what I can understand of the literature surrounding this the diocese retained a Vosko-like clone to direct the scheme. When lay opposition mounted to make a defence of the baldachino and stalls the plans were redrawn and a compromise made. Nevertheless, the very beautiful and unusual altar rails and gates perished. But, still, the new high altar is five steps up; how V2 is that?!

This is a strange church altogether. I note on their website that they have an old rite mass every Sunday: A case of liturgical schizophrenia.
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Feb 14, 2006 6:24 pm

This was the Basilica before the wreckage (2003)

Covington Cathedral was begun in 1894 and brought to its present (unsifinished) state in 1915.

The architect was Leon Coquard

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This is what happened:

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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 15, 2006 1:49 am

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Concepton of Our Lady, Denver, Colorado

Leon Croquard

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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 16, 2006 2:56 am

Re the Immaculate Conception, Denver try this link

http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=121475
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 16, 2006 9:12 pm

St Patrick's Cathedral, New York


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The ground plan of St. Patrick's showing the altar rail traversing the nave and both transcepts, as in Cobh.

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http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/medny/stpat1.html
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Gianlorenzo » Fri Feb 17, 2006 1:32 am

In 2002, Cardinal Egan of New York ordered the Jesuits who staff the historic St. Ignatius Church in Manhattan (below) to halt a proposed "renovation" of the Church which would have removed the Communion rail and moved the altar into the nave, among other changes in a $3M project.
Although the Jesuits' proposed 'renovation' had received the approval of the archdiocesan officials, Cardinal Egan stepped in and stopped the work.
In a letter to the priest of the parish, Rev. Walter F. Modrys, dated March 6th 2002, he rejected the sanctuary proposal, saying it was unwarranted and harmful to the Church's tradition.
Oh, to have such a church leader in Ireland.

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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Luzarches » Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:05 am

More Stateside reorderings:

1. The cathedral in Altoona
2. Cathedral Church of the Incarnation, Nashville, Tennessee
3. Cathedral of St John the Baptist, Charleston
4. Cathedral of St Joseph, Buffalo.

If anyone has better quality pics of these in either before or after conditions then I would love to have them.
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Luzarches » Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:08 am

These are the pictures.
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Luzarches » Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:14 am

The first image here is meant to be in my previous post and is a lamentably poor image of St Joseph's Cathedral, Buffalo.

The other images are of the cathedral of St Peter's, Marquette, Michigan. I think one doesn't need to be an architectural dectective to work out what's gone on here, don't all cathedras have gradines?
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:24 pm

The Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Boston

Patrick Keely



Patrick Charles Keely was born in Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland, on August 9, 1816, the son of a builder who had moved to Thurles from Mlkenny to construct St. Patrick's College. After its completion in 1837, the elder Keely acted as both architect and builder for the Fever Hospital, finished in 1840. What training in architectural design young Patrick received is unknown, but it is likely that he learned construction from his father.

At age 25 he sailed for America, settling in Brooklyn where he took up the carpentry trade. Among his first designs were altars at the Seminary at Lafargeville and in St. James' Pro-cathedral in Brooklyn, for which he acted as superintendent of construction as well. In due course, a young priest of his acquaintance, Father Sylvester Malone, contacted Keely regarding a new church he planned to build in the Williamsburgh section of Brooklyn. Together they worked out a plan from which Keely developed a Gothic design. Its dedication in 1846 opened a new era in Catholic building, and Keely was besieged with requests for designs of churches and other buildings to serve the rapidly increasing immigrant population.

In 1849, a scant three years after completing his first church, Keely was called upon to design the Cathedral at Albany for Bishop McClusky, who was to become the first American cardinal. This was the first of 20 cathedrals for which he received commissions, including those in Chicago, Cleveland, Buffalo, Hartford, Newark, Providence, and, of course, Boston. His total output of churches is said to total more than 600, plus a number of institutional buildings, Virtually all of which were religiously oriented. The geographical distribution of Keely's work ranged from Charleston, South Carolina to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and as far west as Iowa.
Keely's work in Boston may have begun as early as 1851, with the rebuilding and enlarging of the Church of Saints Peter and Paul in South Boston. This granite Gothic Revival structure was designed by Gridley J.F. Bryant in 1843, completed in 1845 and burned in 1848. Its rebuilding was completed in 1853. Keely's first complete church in Boston was St. James on Albany Street (1853-55), followed by Most Holy Redeemer in East Boston (1854-57), Notre Dame Academy in Roxbury (1855-71), Church of the Immaculate Conception in the South End (1866-61), St. Francis de Sales in Charlestown (1859-62), Cathedral of the Holy Cross in the South End (1861-75), St. Francis de Sales in Roxbury (1867-69), Our Lady of the Assumption in East Boston (1869-73), St. Thomas Aquinas in Jamaica Plain (1869-73), St. Augustine in South Boston (1870-74), Holy Trinity in the South End (1871-77), St. Vincent de Paul in South Boston (1872-74), St. James the Greater in Chinatown (1873-75), St. Peter in Dorchester (1873-84), St. Mary in the North End (1875-77), Our Lady of Victory (?) (1877), St. Joseph's Church interior in Roxbury (1883), St. Peter's rectory (ca. 1885), and St. Mary in Charlestown (1887-92). The successor firm of Keely and Houghton designed St. Margaret's Church in Dorchester (1899-1904) and St. Mary's School in Charlestown (1901-02).
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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:46 pm

The Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Boston

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An interior viw of the Cathedral from 1911

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Re: reordering and destruction of irish cathedrals and churches

Postby fgordon » Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:13 pm

Washington’s Cathedral of St. Matthew – a disarmingly modest structure in that city of giant edifices – was recently restored. This was a true restoration.

All credit to the Pastor and whoever else determined that the restoration should be precisely that: restoring the already quite attractive elements to their pristine condition. No destruction, no wild re-orderings, no parachuting in of discordant elements; in a word, no doctrinaire impositions. :)

It bodes well that the capital of the U.S. has shown the way forward for the rest of that nation. Perhaps those menaces who have masqueraded for all too long in that country as liturgical experts - and who have very expensively wrecked many fine churches - could find a place in one of the many museums in D.C.!! :D

The image below is somewhat poor – perhaps a better one can be found. The link http://www.stmatthewscathedral.org does not have great images of the restored building, though it has an interesting gallery of the restoration work.

With reference to the discussion on altar rails, it is to be noted that St. Matthew's has retained them.
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Feb 19, 2006 2:46 am

The Cathedral in Saint Louis


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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:43 pm

Cathedral if the Sacred Heart, Newark, New Jersey

http://www.cathedralbasilica.org/
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Sat Aug 26, 2006 10:10 pm

The Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains, Cincinnati, Ohio

Built by Bishop John Baptist Purcell in 1841 to designs by Henry Walter.

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John Baptist Purcell was born in Mallow, Co. Cork on 26 February 1800. He was ordained on 20 May 1826 and appointed president of Mount St. Mary's Emmetsburg, Maryland. Consecrated as bishop of Cincinnati in Baltimore 13 October 1833. First Archbishop of Cincinnato 19 July 1850. He died 4 July 1883.

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http://www.stpeterinchainscathedral.org/art.asp
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:45 pm

The Cathedral of Jesus and Mary, Baltimore, Maryland, built by Archbishop John Carroll to plans by Henry Latrobe (1806-1821).

The historic Baltimore Basilica, built from 1806-1821, was the first great metropolitan Cathedral constructed in America after the adoption of the Constitution. America's first cathedral, officially known as the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, quickly became a symbol of the country's newfound religious freedom.


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http://www.baltimorebasilica.org/architecture/architectural_features.html
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Sep 04, 2006 11:29 am

The Cathedral of St. Peter, Wilmington built by Fr. Patrick Kenny to plans by the architect Pierre Bauduy on 12 September 1816.

Unfortunately, not much remains fo the original classical sanctuary.
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Sep 04, 2006 11:43 am

The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and St. Finbar, Charleston built by Bishop John England



On May 3, 1821, Bishop John England purchased property on the northeast corner of Broad and Friend (now Legare) as a site for the cathedral. A "dwelling house" was on the lot, and on December 30, 1821, Bishop England blessed it as a temporary chapel for the congregation. The cornerstone was laid for the first cathedral at the present site on July 30, 1850. Called the Cathedral of St. John and St. Finbar, it was consecrated on April 6, 1854.

On December 11, 1861, a fire broke out in a factory on Hasell Street, destroying much of Charleston including the cathedral. Everything was lost.

Cathedral Fund-raising for a new cathedral continued for the next 45 years, and the cornerstone for the present Cathedral of St. John the Baptist was laid in January 1890. The Gothic architecture calls for a spire, but due to lack of funds, it was never built. The lower church includes a crypt where Bishop England, his sister and three other Charleston bishops are buried. The antebellum 1854 cathedral could seat 1,200 people and cost $103,000 to build.

The present church was built on the foundation of the 1854 cathedral. The structure is of Connecticut tool-chiseled brownstone. Over each entrance are unique stained glass windows including the Papal coat of arms and the seal of the state of South Carolina. The pews are of carved Flemish oak, and the main altar is of white Vermont marble.

The original titulus is probably explained by the fact the Bishop John England was born in Passage West in Cork:
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05470a.htm
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Sep 04, 2006 12:00 pm

Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Savannah, Georgia


Pope Pius IX erected the Diocese of Savannah on July 19, 1850, as had been requested by the Seventh Provincial Council of Baltimore in May 1849. At its creation, the diocese included all of Georgia and most of Florida, with a total Catholic population of 5,500 Catholics. The first bishop of Savannah was the Rt. Rev. Francis X. Gartland. The Church of Saint John the Baptist, then the only Catholic church in Savannah, became the Cathedral. Bishop Gartland enlarged the building with an addition measuring 25 by 60 feet, and repaired the hurricane-damaged roof. He rededicated the Cathedral on June 26, 1853.

In 1870, Pope Pius IX appointed the Right Reverend Ignatius Persico as the fourth bishop of Savannah. The diocese now covered just the state of Georgia, and had 20,000 Catholics and 30 churches. Bishop Persico inaugurated plans for building a new Cathedral. He secured the grounds for the planned Cathedral from the Sisters of Mercy, who owned a parcel of land adjacent to Saint Vincent’s Academy on Abercorn Street, running back along Harris Street to Lincoln Street. In exchange for this land, the Sisters received from the diocese a lot of the same size at East Taylor and Lincoln Streets. Bishop Persico resigned the see for reasons of health in 1872. He died a cardinal in 1895.

Bishop Persico’s successor, the Right Reverend William H. Gross, C.Ss.R., laid the cornerstone of the new Cathedral on November 19, 1873. The new structure was dedicated to "Our Lady of Perpetual Help," a name the Cathedral retained for about ten years.

On April 30, 1876, the Most Reverend James Roosevelt Bayley, Archbishop of Baltimore, dedicated the new brick Cathedral, which was of French Gothic style with imposing nave and transepts. Bronze-colored iron columns supported triple rows of groined arches. The main altar and four side altars were designed by Baldwin & Price of Baltimore and crafted of white Italian marble.

Bishop Gross was tranferred and his successor, the Right Reverend Thomas A. Becker, sixth bishop of Savannah, discovered during a pilgrimage to Rome that the Vatican had never formally approved the Cathedral’s change in name; indeed, the Holy See directed that the parish resume the title of Saint John the Baptist with Our Lady of Perpetual Help as a secondary patron. Bishop Becker completed the Cathedral with the building of the spires in 1896. The brick structure was also stuccoed and whitewashed.

On Sunday evening, February 6, 1898, the Cathedral caught fire and was nearly destroyed. Thousands watched as the building burned. Only the outside walls and the two spires remained standing afterwards; the bishop’s residence was spared. While the embers were still smoldering, Bishop Becker declared, "The Cathedral must be rebuilt, and as soon as possible."

On July 29, 1899, during the work of reconstruction, Bishop Becker died while visiting the Catholic boys’ orphanage in Washington, Georgia. Father Benjamin Keiley was soon appointed the seventh bishop of Savannah. He presided over the first Mass celebrated in the rebuilt Cathedral on December 24, 1899, in the basement chapel. The rebuilt Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist was dedicated on October 28, 1900, by Archbishop Sebastian Martinelli, apostolic delegate to the United States.
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Sep 04, 2006 12:14 pm

Cathedral of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Richmond, Virginia
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Re: cathedrals of the united states

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Sep 04, 2006 12:25 pm

The Cathedral of St. Joseph, Wheeling-Charleston.

Two cathedrals have occupied this site. the history of both is perhaps best gleaned from the following link:

http://images.google.ie/imgres?imgurl=http://www.dwc.org/Cathedral_files/slide0001_image004.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.dwc.org/Cathedral_files/slideshow.shtml&h=201&w=188&sz=7&hl=it&start=16&tbnid=x-iLZkwFVyVUrM:&tbnh=104&tbnw=97&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dcathedral%2Bwheeling%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Dit%26lr%3D

Below are some photographs of old St. Joseph's:
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