Ambassador's Residence in Berlin

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Ambassador's Residence in Berlin

Postby MG » Tue Jan 11, 2000 10:13 am

"The embassy is renting office space in the Checkpoint Charlie building, but the Department of Foreign Affairs has bought an ambassador's residence in the elegant district of Grünewald. A listed Bauhaus building, it offers plenty of room for official entertaining, but the embassy expects to host many receptions in its large conference room, where the ambassador was yesterday supervising the hanging of two Louis le Brocquy paintings just arrived from "

from The Irish Times....


Anybody got any idea what this looks like.....
MG
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Postby Manfred » Tue Jan 11, 2000 3:21 pm

"Philip Johnson's stark, modernist business centre, which houses the embassy, is a gleaming manifestation of the new Berlin, where east and west meet in what the authorities hope will be a spirit of entrepreneurial optimism. None of this symbolism is lost on the Ambassador, Mr Noel Fahy, but he is more concerned with the practical advantages of the location.

"You can walk to the Foreign Ministry, you can walk to the Reichstag, you can even walk to the Chancellery at the moment. It's a very functional place, but it's close to everywhere we need to go," he said.

The embassy, which will be officially opened today by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr Andrews, is one of the State's busiest, issuing more passports than any other in Europe except London."

Irish Times.

No idea what the Residence looks like, would be more interested in finding out about the Embassy itself.

Manfred, Germany.
Manfred
 

Postby Manfred » Tue Jan 11, 2000 3:31 pm

Have found a picture of the Philip Johnson development. It´s on a page discussing his life achievments along with an interview with him. It´s an interesting development, although it hasn't moved much from his recent style.

The addess:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/environment/johnson_7-9a.html
Manfred
 


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