Design Process

World architecture... what's happening generally....

Design Process

Postby Asharch22 » Thu May 29, 2008 2:12 am

Hello,

I'm currently working on my own project for the summer before I head back to 2nd year in Architecture. (Mainly to strengthen my design process, develop a particular style and work with more software programs such as Rhino) Throughout my first year, I had difficulties with my design processes for several projects. I always developed ideas at an early stage but struggled delivering it in three dimension. Whether it be too many unsynchronized concepts merged into one, or it was one concept that was too abstract for me to translate.

I tried different techniques to organize my thoughts, some successful, but I'm still in search for a particular method that can speed up my design process. I continuously sketch, play with models, and write and organize my thoughts. More experienced people in the field tell me I'll eventually speed up the design process over time. Others tell me I need to find my style, or inspirer, to guide me. I want to hear your thoughts, or suggestions. I would truly appreciate it!

Another question. People tell me its wise to sketch in the beginning stages of a project, which I agree. But sometimes, one gets stuck in a design concept and needs to experiment with forms on a 3-D program. Is this bad? Should one continue to sketch and come with a solid design concept from the sketches and not from the computer?

Thanks
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Re: Design Process

Postby experiMental » Fri May 30, 2008 10:49 am

The design method that you're having now would be more suitable for sculpture and maybe even interior design. It would probably work well, depending on your ability to express yourself in colour, composition, etc.

Exterior architecture is not like this at all. You'll be constructing a building in an environment surrounded by other buildings, rather than in a plain coloured gallery. Before approaching a project, try to place it in a particular area - e.g a playground or a park. Try to get an essence of that place first of all. Then, try to come up with a form that would suit this environment in any way possible.

There is an ongoing trend of socially responsible architecture, that tries to stop people from committing crime and other things like that. I've found that in many architectural competitions, entries that successfully conformed to this trend were a lot more highly commended than entries that concentrated purely on style.

Governments in many countries prefer this kind of architecture. The way to become a successful architect is to work around the government's needs.
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Experimenting around with 3d programs might actually help, if you're an active sort of person who doesn't like sitting down and visualizing things in head. You may arrive with some decent forms after random tweaking.
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Re: Design Process

Postby Blisterman » Fri May 30, 2008 1:10 pm

experiMental wrote:There is an ongoing trend of socially responsible architecture, that tries to stop people from committing crime and other things like that.

Which is, in real life, mostly nonsense.

But you're right. Architecture tutors love that sort of stuff.
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Re: Design Process

Postby Asharch22 » Sat May 31, 2008 9:47 pm

Thank you, I really appreciate your suggestions
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Re: Design Process

Postby notjim » Sat May 31, 2008 10:28 pm

experiMental wrote:There is an ongoing trend of socially responsible architecture, that tries to stop people from committing crime and other things like that. I've found that in many architectural competitions, entries that successfully conformed to this trend were a lot more highly commended than entries that concentrated purely on style.


Here is an amusing/weird variation on this, a house whose awkwardness is designed to stop you aging:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/03/garden/03destiny.html?_r=1&ref=garden&oref=slogin

THE house is off-limits to children, and adults are asked to sign a waiver when they enter. The main concern is the concrete floor, which rises and falls like the surface of a vast, bumpy chocolate chip cookie.

But, for Arakawa, 71, an artist who designed the house with his wife, Madeline Gins, the floor is a delight, as well as a proving ground.

As he scampered across it with youthful enthusiasm on a Friday evening in March, he compared himself to the first man to walk on the moon. “If Neil Armstrong were here, he would say, ‘This is even better!’ ”

Then Ms. Gins, 66, began holding forth about the health benefits of the house, officially called Bioscleave House (Lifespan Extending Villa). Its architecture makes people use their bodies in unexpected ways to maintain equilibrium, and that, she said, will stimulate their immune systems.

“They ought to build hospitals like this,” she said.

A reporter, who thinks they should never, ever build hospitals like this, tried to go with the flow. Like the undulating floor, Arakawa and Gins, as they are known professionally, tend to throw people off balance.

In 45 years of working together as artists, poets and architects, they have developed an arcane philosophy of life and art, a theory they call reversible destiny. Essentially, they have made it their mission — in treatises, paintings, books and now built projects like this one — to outlaw aging and its consequences.

“It’s immoral that people have to die,” Ms. Gins explained.

The house on Long Island, which cost more than $2 million to build, is their first completed architectural work in the United States — and, as they see it, a turning point in their campaign to defeat mortality.
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Re: Design Process

Postby experiMental » Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:38 pm

notjim wrote:Here is an amusing/weird variation on this, a house whose awkwardness is designed to stop you aging:
.........................
Then Ms. Gins, 66, began holding forth about the health benefits of the house, officially called Bioscleave mortality.


Amazing! This house has the function AND the form. It's like a really abstracted variation of some kind of a forest. It sure is more fun, but how the heck would one move about in it after a really heavy night, without tripping over and injuring himself?

It works for a residential function, but it certainly wouldn't work for a hospital. Just think of all the accidents on the curved floor. :X
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