Architectural heritage of Limerick

Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby dc3 » Sat Jun 07, 2008 6:00 am

Just bought the new book on the architectural heritage of Limerick city and it is excellent, with many very interesting photos. Nice to see another one in this series emerging, it seem to have been a while since one was published. This is perhaps the best so far.

Our ecclesiastical friends on this site will find much to interest them.

One small quibble, it might be a good idea to try to date the photos. There are captions that could be misread.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:46 pm

dc3, you have just raised my expectations on this book! Hope O’Mahony’s have ordered enough, so that I can pick up a copy on vacation soon. NIAH
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue Jun 10, 2008 9:32 pm

Thanks Paul!
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:18 pm

Limerick's built heritage is brought to book (Limerick Leader)

Published Date: 21 June 2008 By David Hurley

OVER 700 of Limerick city's most historic buildings have been included in a new book, which was launched by Environment Minister John Gormley at City Hall this week.

Photographs and critiques of the buildings all feature in the book which was produced by the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage on behalf of the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.

The launch of the book followed the publication of a special commemorative poster in last week's Limerick Leader.

"There are very fine churches which are a credit to their congregations.

"The two cathedrals, medieval St Mary's and the Victorian Gothic Revival St John's, are both buildings of national importance.

"There is Limerick's Georgian core, Newtown Pery, a notable example of urban planning and design and an impressive Georgian new town – the elaborately carved doorcases and fanlights, hinting at the importance of the interiors," said Minister Gormley.

The director of Limerick Civic Trust, Denis Leonard, welcomed the publication of the book.

"It is a great looking book. It is very attractive and is a great record of the best of Limerick architecture.

"It shows what is good all around the city. I am very enthused about it," he said.

At the launch, Limerick City Council senior planner Dick Tobin revealed that some of the buildings featured had collapsed since they were photographed almost two years ago.

"Since the record has been made, I think three of these buildings have fallen down.

"It underlines the difficulty of preserving buildings that are 300 years old.

"I think some of them were never designed to last this long and it is a continuing struggle to ensure there is sufficient cash available to maintain the buildings and to keep them in useful occupation," he said.

Minister Gormley expressed his dissappointment at the collapse of the buildings.

"It is always regrettable when you see that kind of dereliction and that is why it is so important that we concentrate on conservation and recognise its importance.

"But I don't want this book to be simply a record, I want to have a living heritage that we can see and appreciate," he stressed.


Minister launches Architectural Heritage Survey of Limerick (Department of Environment)
18/06/08

The Minister for Environment, Heritage and Local Government, Mr John Gormley, T.D. to-day (17th June) launched his Department’s Architectural Heritage Survey of Limerick City and the associated book, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Limerick City. This was the eighteenth survey conducted by the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Speaking in City Hall, the Minister made reference to some highlights in terms of architectural heritage which the City boasts: “There are very fine churches which are a credit to their congregations. The two cathedrals, medieval St Mary’s - the oldest building in the city still in its original use - and the Victorian Gothic Revival, St John’s, are both buildings of national importance. There is Limerick’s Georgian core, Newtown Pery, a notable example of urban planning and design and an impressive Georgian new town - the elaborately carved doorcases and fanlights, hinting at the importance of the interiors.”

The Minister made reference to some examples in the book of best practice in Architecture, both in terms of the sensitive adaptation of heritage buildings for new uses and of more modern architecture “the former corn store at the junction of Shannon Street and Henry Street, has been successfully converted into apartments. The award winning Shannon Rowing Club, on Sarsfield Bridge, is a superb example of a new building type developed for new functions – in this case for leisure - in the early twentieth century.”

As the surveys are published, the Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government, formally recommends to the planning authority that structures identified as of Regional importance or higher be included in the city or county’s Records of Protected Structures (RPS). The RPS is the record which planning authorities are obliged to maintain under the Planning and Development Act 2000 which confers certain legal protections on such structures. A total of 732 structures in the survey of Limerick City are rated as being of Regional or higher importance.

Structures on the RPS can qualify for grant assistance for conservation works and the Minister alluded to this in his address. “ In 2008, I have allocated funding of almost €25 Million to support built heritage projects throughout the country. This provision represents a record increase of 42% on the amount spent in 2007.

Funding of €100,000 has been allocated by my Department to Limerick City Council and €257,000 to Limerick County Council this year to support the conservation of protected structures. These amounts represent a significant increase on the 2007 allocations. I am also pleased to announce here today that St. Mary’s Cathedral, Limerick, will receive a grant of €250,000 for conservation works under the Significant Places of Public Worship initiative administered by the Heritage Council.


The Architectural Heritage Survey of Limerick City and the associated book, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Limerick City.

The book itself self, been an introduction with 120 pages covers very well the city’s architecture and retails at just €12 is very good value for money.

Obviously the over 700 of Limerick city's most historic buildings have been not been included in the new book as incorrectly written by the Limerick Leader Article above. The author probably meant the on-line Survey version.

Buildings of Ireland (Survey Highlights)

  • Bridges
  • Villa Architecture
  • Uniform Victorian/Edwardian Terraces
  • Ecclesiastical Architecture
  • Public Monuments


I found the navigation a bit confusing, to get all 731 results per advanced search, just leave the selection parameters empty and submit.
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Re: Planning Notices ~ Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:12 pm

50 & 51 Catherine Street

GrahamH wrote:So am I right in gathering that these are currently only proposed Protected Structures?!


See NIAH Description ~ Appraisal for nos. 50 & 51.

Tuborg wrote:I remember seeing some form of enforcement notice attached to the fencing last summer, around the time 1 or 2 bricks had come loose! :rolleyes:


Image Image

I see what you mean. Just hope they would speed up the need to produce the “Further Information” for the buildings sake.
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Re: Planning Notices ~ Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:22 pm

5 Little Gerald Griffin Street

gunter wrote:As cute as they are, I have to say they're not as cute as this little number on Little Gerald Griffin Street.

Image Image

Image

A personal sized stone warehouse! You don't see that everyday, and so what if the front leans out a bit, that just means there's more elbow room inside on the upper floors.


Instinctively people here tend to walk on the opposite side of the street.;)

NIAH Description ~ Appraisal of 5 Little Gerald Griffin Street

End-of-terrace three-bay three-storey former warehouse, built c. 1800, with roof set behind tall parapet of cut limestone blocks. Squared limestone walls with cut limestone quoins to front and side elevations. Rendered section to the ground floor where loading entrance may have existed. Segmental-headed windows, many blocked up, with brick surrounds. Panelled timber doors with timber surrounds. Red brick chimney stack. Glazed timber modern door set into side elevation.

The survival of this former corn warehouse is important in an area that is under threat from development. The good quality stone work and the retention of some of the original timber doors adds to the architectural merit of the building.

Image Image



I would say that these buildings are under a greater threat from neglect and decay than from development. The next post on Boru House underlines this neglect very much.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:38 pm

Mayor of Limerick calls to protect home of Kate O'Brien ~ Boru House (Limerick Leader)

Published Date: 03 February 2009 By Anne Sheridan

MAYOR of Limerick John Gilligan has lent his support to calls to protect Boru House – the home of the late writer Kate O'Brien – in advance of the upcoming literary festival held in her honour.

The Mulgrave Street property has been up for sale for a number of years with a price-tag of €1.4m but the mayor believes the slump in property prices may allow the Council to buy the house.

"Property prices are falling, we have to recognise that, and if we're going buying property, now is the time to do it. We will soon be short of a library in the city (due to the Opera Centre development) and there is a huge courtyard behind Boru House suitable for development which could fit in and be sympathetic to the old house," said the mayor.

He said he is "very saddened to see the condition of Kate O'Brien's house", which he described as one of the most historic houses in Limerick.

"It would be absolutely dreadful if it deteriorated any further and I'd love to see it being brought back to full use, not just as a monument to Kate but to preserve one of the better buildings in the city," he said.

The massive 36,023 sq ft property on Mulgrave Street, which is being sold by de Courcy estate agents, includes seven bedrooms and four additional rooms in the attic. The property is owned by the Lloyd family, who previously hoped to secure more than the €1.4 million prior to the property slump.

Auctioneer John de Courcy said a number of people have visited the property in recent months and any offers would be put to the family for consideration.

The annual Kate O'Brien weekend will run from February 27 to March 1 this year and will feature readings from a host of influential literary figures in the city's Circuit Court building at Merchant's Quay.

This year's theme is to celebrate Irish writing in honour of the famous Limerick author, and participating writers include John Banville, Lia Mills, Dermot Bolger and Glenn Patterson.

"This year the committee members really made a special effort to get a good calibre of writer to celebrate the weekend," said Sheila Deegan, arts officer with Limerick City Council.

A book entitled Faithful Companions, featuring the people who have celebrated the weekend over the last quarter of a century, will be published in advance of the weekend and is edited by local writer and broadcaster Mary Coll.

For an updated list of all events log on to http://www.kobweekend.com


Heritage been lost here through vandalism and poor passive property management.

From what I heard from home the elderly owners had passed away and their house came on the market. The house was in top shape.

The images below highlights how an unused house can in such a short period of time go from an intact one into a state of dereliction.

In my opinion the owners of this NIAH protected house are partly responsible for passively letting youths a free hand to use it as a drinking den, resulting in a fire.:mad:

Image DerHur

See NIAH Description ~ Appraisal
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Wed Apr 15, 2009 2:50 pm

While it's a nice building, and the tie-in with an author's house would be a nice idea, this is too far away from the city centre to house the library. Why can't they just buy the Franciscan church and put it in there?
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Tuborg » Wed Apr 15, 2009 8:47 pm

Its pretty remarkable that the little stone warehouse is still standing and that it also managed to escape the encroachment of those horrible 1990s apartments! Although it wont be with us for much longer if someone dosent show some interest in hauling it back from the brink!

As for Boru House, theres no doubt that it should be acquired by the City Council and promptly handed over to Limerick Civic Trust, who have consistently shown themselves to be a safe pair of hands in terms of conservation projects. With a little imagination it could be turned into a museum or literary centre of some description. Although in the current climate its probably unlikely that the council or even the State would commit any funds to a possible purchase.:(

On a more positive note. The former georgian townhouse at 8 Cecil Street that was on the verge of collapsing last summer, has now been repaired. Most of the scaffolding came down last week, with only the hoarding surrounding the ground floor remaining. Its timber sash windows have been repaired/replaced and what looks like a 3 storey extension has been constructed to the rear.

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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby gunter » Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:54 pm

This house on Denmark Street (possibly no. 36?) could use a bit of tlc.

Possibly the last full set of flush windows in the city?

I suspect that the Polish shop to the right (no. 35?) may always have been a seperate house, but maybe not, either way both were clearly built together and the whole terrace is important.

Image

Image Image

I'd hate to see new owners slap in pvc windows, or worse a knock-it-down planning application!

Apologies for some low-grade photography.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby vkid » Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:28 pm

Image

also low grade photos but does anyone have any info on this building...the red brick on the left? Shame to see it like this. Its one i really like every time I pass and kind of reminds me of some of the images in the Dutch Billy thread...
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:14 pm

gunter wrote:This house on Denmark Street (possibly no. 36?) could use a bit of tlc.

Possibly the last full set of flush windows in the city?

I suspect that the Polish shop to the right (no. 35?) may always have been a seperate house, but maybe not, either way both were clearly built together and the whole terrace is important.

I'd hate to see new owners slap in pvc windows, or worse a knock-it-down planning application!

Apologies for some low-grade photography.


34 Denmark Street

Gunter you certainly have an eye for the old ones!

Again the NIAH have listed it and it is some 250 years old and sadly looking every day of it! Again it seems to be going faster down hill since the NIAH recently recorded it.

ImageImageImage
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:38 pm

vkid wrote:also low grade photos but does anyone have any info on this building...the red brick on the left? Shame to see it like this. Its one i really like every time I pass and kind of reminds me of some of the images in the Dutch Billy thread...


Vkid, I found nothing of this building on a NIAH search for Thomas Street. I suppose since Thomas Street is part of the Newtownpery Georgian Grid, would probably mean that it is not an original “Dutch Billy”. Maybe some of the Dutch Billy cracks might give us a few clues?
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Tuborg » Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:20 am

gunter wrote:This house on Denmark Street (possibly no. 36?) could use a bit of tlc.

Possibly the last full set of flush windows in the city?

I suspect that the Polish shop to the right (no. 35?) may always have been a seperate house, but maybe not, either way both were clearly built together and the whole terrace is important.

I'd hate to see new owners slap in pvc windows, or worse a knock-it-down planning application!



Gunter, that example from Denmark Street just further illustrates the plight of Limerick's historical building stock.:(

I had a bit of a stare at it the other day. To say its in a perilous condition would be a serious understatement, much of the brickwork on the top 2 floors has started to sag and bulge, which cant be good! I realise they may be difficult to identify but surely the City Council can force the owners to carry out some repair works, in the interest of public safety at least!

I guess those "For Sale" signs mean we'll surely see an attempt at some kind of redevelopment when the market improves again!

It would be a real shame to lose this building, especially considering its one of the last remaining originals on a street thats been almost entirely redeveloped over the last 20 years!
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby gunter » Sat Apr 18, 2009 2:24 am

Image

Just looking at that streetscape again, there is a good degree of similarity between 34/35 and the yellow painted rendered house beyond (no. 33, I guess). The brickwork is continuous across the adjoining facades with no vertical joint until we reach no. 36 on this side. That would suggest that no. 35 (the 'Taste of Europe' shop) may have originally been the carriage arch to no. 34, mirroring the arrangement at no. 33 (the yellow building). The continuous brickwork would obviously also imply that both, substantial, (now) three bay, structures were built at the same time.

The level change on the upper floors from no. 33 to no. 34/5 might originally have been reflected at ground level also where the street may originally have sloped more steeply in the direction of the river, before the creation of Rutland Street / Patrick Street necessitated the end of the street to be levelled up. Total speculation I know, but you just sense that these houses would respond to a bit of delving into.

On that subject, I noticed from the Google Earth views that there's a splendid vantage point in the form of a multi-storey car park directly opposite these houses, maybe Tuborg could be persuaded to go down that way again and take some close-ups of the roof structures and that facade brickwork again, just to be sure there isn't a joint close to the junction with the render ;)
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Pot Noodle » Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:15 am

I find nothing of interest in these buildings they look like they were slapped up
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Tuborg » Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:26 pm

Pot Noodle wrote:I find nothing of interest in these buildings they look like they were slapped up


Thanks for that valuable and well considered contribution!:rolleyes:

gunter wrote:
On that subject, I noticed from the Google Earth views that there's a splendid vantage point in the form of a multi-storey car park directly opposite these houses, maybe Tuborg could be persuaded to go down that way again and take some close-ups of the roof structures and that facade brickwork again, just to be sure there isn't a joint close to the junction with the render ;)


If I get the chance gunter, I'll be going in minus the car. The last time I parked there, some idiot in a jeep destroyed the side of it reversing into a space!:mad:

Live Maps gives a decent view of those buildings aswell. It would appear that both no. 33 & 34 were extended in the not too distant past, probably during the 90s.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Tuborg » Sun Apr 19, 2009 8:37 pm

Tuborg wrote:On a more positive note. The former georgian townhouse at 8 Cecil Street that was on the verge of collapsing last summer, has now been repaired. Most of the scaffolding came down last week, with only the hoarding surrounding the ground floor remaining. Its timber sash windows have been replaced and what looks like a 3 storey extension has been constructed to the rear.

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Photo taken last week.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sun Apr 19, 2009 10:11 pm

Well there's no use having ONE building with timber sash windows in a terrace full of pvc. The situation with pvc windows in Georgian Limerick is shameful. Walking around Limerick, it's impossible not to be struck by how utterly beautiful the city could be if they treated Georgian terraces with some respect. Even if they just put in the correct windows and put proper paving down it would make a world of difference.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby gunter » Mon Apr 20, 2009 12:34 am

Pot Noodle wrote:I find nothing of interest in these buildings they look like they were slapped up


Flush windows Pot!

. . . . doesn't get much more exciting than this :)

There's another example at the corner of William Street and Little Catherine Street, but here the original glazing bars haven't survived.

Image

The presence of several examples of pre-standard Georgian features on houses dotted around the northern end of New Town Perry raises the question of just how much of Georgian Limerick, in reality, was 'planned new town' and how much could be characterised as organic growth.

The 1769 map gives a vision of the New Town Perry enterprise as a tight grid of streets with a couple of circuses thrown in for relief, but it leaves vague the development of the lands on the east side of Rutland St./Patrick St, the are around Ellen Street and Denmark St.

Image

It's a bit difficult to be sure, but it looks like the northernmost cross street of New Town Perry, as illustrated, would equate to William Street, is that the general view?
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby jimg » Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:11 am

That's what it looked like to me gunter until I tried lining up the maps. The old map is remarkably accurate in terms of geometry for the extent of the town at the time.
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Stuff in the "planned" bit doesn't line up as well but certain features are easily discerned like the distinctive triangle at Patrick St. It looks like the town was already built up around this area.

Anyway, it looks to me like William St. is the second cross street rather than the first which (somewhat badly) lines closer to Denmark St.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby gunter » Mon Apr 20, 2009 1:05 pm

jimg wrote:. . . . it looks to me like William St. is the second cross street rather than the first which (somewhat badly) lines closer to Denmark St.


Am about 3/4 convinced jimg, the extra out-turn on the Arthurs Quay triangle is making it hard to nail down an anchor at the west end, and the junction with the pre-existing street pattern at the east end could equally be interpreted either way. The fact that the second street is shown broader and, in this regard, relates better to the reality as built, probably just about clinches it, right enough. We'll have to get our hands on some higher resolution images!

What I was going to try to do was put some markers on locations (CologneMike style) where houses with non-standard Georgian features are found, just to see if we could put a reliable boundary on the Dutch Billy thing and see if there was a zone of transitional Georgian houses in Limerick, or just a headlong plunge into Georgianna.

It would have been handy it Limerick could have just embraced the corner fireplace, like everyone else :rolleyes:

ImageImage
The 1769 map again showing the aspiration to construct 'New Town Perry' and a map from circa 1820s showing what was carried out (with still some aspirational stuff south of the Crescent and in the area of 'The New Square'.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:08 pm

Pot Noodle wrote:I find nothing of interest in these buildings they look like they were slapped up


These are definitely in a very sad state of affairs but if only these walls could talk...........

One possible explanation for the crooked brick-boundary-line between the house “Taste of Europe” and its neighbour to the right, was the result of a gunpowder explosion at Richardson's Gunsmith Warehouse (corner George Street / Denmark Street).

See shaded buildings on map from Limerick Museum.

The Limerick Leader published an article about it recently.

Gunpowder Explosion

ON THE 3rd January, 1837, a catastrophe of a most lamentable character occurred in Limerick by an explosion of gunpowder in the premises of one William Richardson, a gun maker and vendor of gunpowder, No. 1 George Street. Eleven persons were killed by this explosion – viz., Margaret McMahon, John McMahon, Bridget O'Donoghue, John O'Brien, Patrick Doolan, Mary Barry, John Enright, Bridget Doolan, John McMahon and Michael O'Neill, a watchman.(Though eleven were mentioned as being killed only ten people were named in the article.)

Interestingly on the linked map above, at the entrance of Arthur’s Quay, there is a sketch of where a front beam of Richardson’s House that killed Dr. Hanly / Dr. Healy? Could he be the eleventh person?


The cause of the catastrophe could never be clearly ascertained, as the only person in the part of the house where the gunpowder lay was blown up and his body torn to pieces.

The terrific details of this dreadful affair cause a shudder of horror whenever they are brought to memory, while the miraculous escape which some respectable families had from being involved in the worst consequences of the explosion is referred to the special agency of Providence.

Every effort was made by the Mayor and magistrates to mitigate the sufferings of the survivors. A deputation laid the matter before the Lord Lieutenant, who gave his active sympathies, and a public subscription was raised to which everyone contributed.

There were four persons under the roof at the time, three of whom were killed, while a young man named Jeskey, an apprentice, escaped with his life, though he had been blown to a great height and came down senseless in the street at a considerable distance.

At the house No. 2 George Street, the widow of Michael Ryan, one of the most extensive and esteemed merchants in the city, resided with her family, two sons, a daughter and sister-in-law.

They were all in bed, being instantly stunned, after lying unconscious under the ruins for an house. The first recital or perception that Mrs. Ryan remembered was hearing her daughter, Barbara, a child of eight years old, who slept with her, crying, "Mamma, where are you?"

They were at the time buried in the debris. A long and fruitless search had been made for them. It was suggested they had gone to the country.

Further exertions were about being relinquished when the almost inaudible cries of the child were heard under the ruins. Efforts were again made and the child was heard to cry to "take care of Mamma," whose collar-bone had been broken, their persons having been overwhelmed in rubbish between the shop and the underground apartment, yet supported by two doors having come together in their fall so as to form an arch over them.

The legs and feet, however, were so crushed that they could not change their position. One of the sons, William, was blown up in the air on the mattress on which he was sleeping and came down in the street with it blazing around him, he asleep all the while. He sustained no injury.

The elder brother was not blown up but the corner of the floor whereupon his bed stood could be seen for days after from the street, like a shelf without support, attached to the tottering wall.

Mrs. Catherine Ryan, sister-in-law of Mrs. Ryan, had no perception of anything having happened until the next morning when she found herself in a public-house in Arthur's Quay, having been blown out, so stunned as to be senseless, buried under a heap of rubbish, and lying for an hour in the street with a beam of timber over her.

A servant, who slept in the room next to Mrs. Catherine Ryan, the sister-in-law of Mrs. Ryan, was blown into the hall of the house No. 3, belonging to Mr. Wm. Wilson. Mr. Ellard, who resided near the corner of Denmark Street, opposite Richardson's was lifted off the ground and with a whirling motion dashed across the street and buried under a heap of rubbish, from which he was dug out. His respectable family had a very narrow escape as had also the family of Mr. Thomas Tracy, who lived at No. 13, of Mr. J. Hallowell, No. 10, and Mr. J. Burke, No. 18, etc., etc.

The gas throughout the city was on this occasion extinguished and windows were broken on the north Strand, at the opposite side of the Shannon. The verdict of the coroner's jury throws blame on the incautious manner in which Richardson had exposed the gunpowder for sale.

Of Mrs. Ryan's two sons, Edmond and William, Edmond was Mayor of Limerick in 1846 and in 1865 RM of Middleton, Co. Cork, and William was drowned.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Apr 21, 2009 12:24 am

gunter wrote:
The 1769 map gives a vision of the New Town Perry enterprise as a tight grid of streets with a couple of circuses thrown in for relief, but it leaves vague the development of the lands on the east side of Rutland St./Patrick St, the are around Ellen Street and Denmark St.

Image

It's a bit difficult to be sure, but it looks like the northernmost cross street of New Town Perry, as illustrated, would equate to William Street, is that the general view?


Gunter, is that map part of Davis Dukart's plan for Newtown Pery?

I'd tend to agree with jimg that the 2nd last cross street more than likely equates to William Street.

If indeed it is William Street, then obviously the next street which leads to the suggested public square is Thomas Street. This would line up with a theory I read about a couple of years ago in an old journal article. Seemingly there was an attempt to develop a large(ish) square in the general area of what is now the Bedford Row/Thomas Street axis and possibly stretching up as far as the Roches Street/Shannon Street junction.

The two other squares on that proposal vaguely correspond to The Crescent and Pery Square, although the positioning is a bit off. Of course Pery Square was never actually completed to its planned dimensions either.
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Re: Architectural heritage of Limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue Jun 23, 2009 10:13 pm

No. 1 Pery Square Hotel & Spa

No. 1 Pery Square has been fully restored with all its original architectural features expertly reinstated in precise detail. The décor and some furnishings are also of the Georgian era.


The images below are from their website gallery. I downsized them for the forum and therefore quality has suffered a bit. The railings it seems have now been finished as the images appear to be from late last year. What is the situation with the first floor ornate balcony? The icing on the cake would be if the ESB removed those hanging cables.

It looks very well and compliments the Limerick Civic Trust “Georgian House & Garden” next door. Any body with more up to date photos?

Previous posts August 2008, October 2007.
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