Developments in Cork

Re: Developments in Cork

Postby daniel_7 » Fri Jun 05, 2009 4:14 pm

Just recently visiting limerick for the first time and was shocked at how much more developed the city centre is too compared to cork. Some nice new buildings and pedestrianised streets with a lot of good offerings in shopping and food. Im not really sure what it is but if i had to say it must have something to do with the planning authorities and whose at the healm. I think theres to many small minded people in the planning department in cork who are doing the city no good. like for instance they say they want to encourage more people to live in the city centre so as to make it vibrant and to help elleveate urban sprawl so why then any time there is any high rise development do they always drastically cut it. Its also baffeling why they are putting a cap on buildings in the docklands to something like 7 storeys when there is an opportunity to have an immpresive waterfront to rival anything in Europe. Another shocking example is the cap cinema site, the new version of the plans that were given the go ahead are small and dingy and shows you the idea these people have for the city. Why are they so afraid of big developments if they want Cork to be a rival to Dublin or any other city in the country and if like they are always saying, they want to promote Cork as a short break tourist destination. Another reason these people got on my nerves recently was there objection to the commuter ferry which can be of only a benefit to the city as a public transport and tourist point of view. Which is after making me think of something else as it could be a stop off of the ferry, if they would get off there holes and push spike as a tourist attraction which could attract thousands of visitors a year and would give Cork a world class tourist attraction which is another thing to stop tourists fleeing to kerry and to encorage them to stay in the city aswell as beamish and crawford which i think should be partly developed commercially as it is a big enough site to cater for a tourist attraction and what i think would be a good idea is maybe is a food hall as Cork is ragarded as the gourmet capital of Ireland with maybe a few niche shops and maybe one or two pub/restaurants serving locally produced beers such as kinsale etc. Another massive blow to the city aswell is the failure of these people to get the redevelopment of cornmaket st pushed through when there was money there, another huge blow to the city from a tourist point of view. Nearly forgot to mention there refusal aswell for plans for a waterpark near pairc ui caoimh, i honestly cant understand these people they are constanly contradicting themselves. This also could of been a massive boost to the city for Cork children themeselves but would of been a good attraction for tourists aswell as attracting hundreds of school tours etc to the city. Just wondering does anyone else know why Limerick or anywhere else for that matter is so much more developed and why Cork is lacking in shopping and food offerings so badly in the city centre and why Cork has trouble attracting retailers and units are left vacent for so long such as any street in the city centre or evan the new cornmarket st centre? Sorry rant over! Just wondering as well do does anyone know who bought the site across from Mahon Retail Park or what’s happing with the murrayford site by cornmarket st or the library site
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby phatman » Fri Jun 05, 2009 6:50 pm

Pug wrote:not sure what thread this would go under apart from Developments in Cork, so just FYI, SDR Developments were given the nod from Bord Pleanala for a mixed office/retail scheme in the vacant site on the South Link Rd in behind OB Heating. Think it will be 5 storeys of about 9000 sqm.


It looks pretty decent overall to me, however I would have one concern, it being that the development would obliterate even more of the view of the northern ridge coming in along the South Link, the Elysian having taken care of the most of it. It is hard to tell though from the photomontage:

http://planning.corkcity.ie/idocs/ViewFiles.aspx?docid=71762&format=djvu
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby mickeydocs » Sun Jun 07, 2009 7:21 am

daniel_7 wrote:Just recently visiting limerick for the first time and was shocked at how much more developed the city centre is too compared to cork. Some nice new buildings and pedestrianised streets with a lot of good offerings in shopping and food. Im not really sure what it is but if i had to say it must have something to do with the planning authorities and whose at the healm. I think theres to many small minded people in the planning department in cork who are doing the city no good. like for instance they say they want to encourage more people to live in the city centre so as to make it vibrant and to help elleveate urban sprawl so why then any time there is any high rise development do they always drastically cut it. Its also baffeling why they are putting a cap on buildings in the docklands to something like 7 storeys when there is an opportunity to have an immpresive waterfront to rival anything in Europe. Another shocking example is the cap cinema site, the new version of the plans that were given the go ahead are small and dingy and shows you the idea these people have for the city. Why are they so afraid of big developments if they want Cork to be a rival to Dublin or any other city in the country and if like they are always saying, they want to promote Cork as a short break tourist destination. Another reason these people got on my nerves recently was there objection to the commuter ferry which can be of only a benefit to the city as a public transport and tourist point of view. Which is after making me think of something else as it could be a stop off of the ferry, if they would get off there holes and push spike as a tourist attraction which could attract thousands of visitors a year and would give Cork a world class tourist attraction which is another thing to stop tourists fleeing to kerry and to encorage them to stay in the city aswell as beamish and crawford which i think should be partly developed commercially as it is a big enough site to cater for a tourist attraction and what i think would be a good idea is maybe is a food hall as Cork is ragarded as the gourmet capital of Ireland with maybe a few niche shops and maybe one or two pub/restaurants serving locally produced beers such as kinsale etc. Another massive blow to the city aswell is the failure of these people to get the redevelopment of cornmaket st pushed through when there was money there, another huge blow to the city from a tourist point of view. Nearly forgot to mention there refusal aswell for plans for a waterpark near pairc ui caoimh, i honestly cant understand these people they are constanly contradicting themselves. This also could of been a massive boost to the city for Cork children themeselves but would of been a good attraction for tourists aswell as attracting hundreds of school tours etc to the city. Just wondering does anyone else know why Limerick or anywhere else for that matter is so much more developed and why Cork is lacking in shopping and food offerings so badly in the city centre and why Cork has trouble attracting retailers and units are left vacent for so long such as any street in the city centre or evan the new cornmarket st centre? Sorry rant over! Just wondering as well do does anyone know who bought the site across from Mahon Retail Park or what’s happing with the murrayford site by cornmarket st or the library site


How many pedestrian streets do you want (Paul Street, Princes Street, Winthrop St. Oliver Plunket St. (partial), etc.)? Cork led the way in relation to this almost 30 years ago.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:09 pm

mickeydocs wrote:How many pedestrian streets do you want (Paul Street, Princes Street, Winthrop St. Oliver Plunket St. (partial), etc.)? Cork led the way in relation to this almost 30 years ago.


I'd agree that Limerick's pedestrianisation effort thus far has far outstripped Cork's. It's simply because the colour of the new pavements in Limerick looks a lot more elegant, especially juxtaposed with the Georgian buildings. The pedestrianisation of Patrick St. and Grand Parade is, in my opinion, not good. The pattern chosen looks blotchy and dirty and too grey. Also, in general, Limerick looks more like a city than Cork with its grid pattern streets and general layout.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby mickeydocs » Sun Jun 07, 2009 7:20 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:I'd agree that Limerick's pedestrianisation effort thus far has far outstripped Cork's. It's simply because the colour of the new pavements in Limerick looks a lot more elegant, especially juxtaposed with the Georgian buildings. The pedestrianisation of Patrick St. and Grand Parade is, in my opinion, not good. The pattern chosen looks blotchy and dirty and too grey. Also, in general, Limerick looks more like a city than Cork with its grid pattern streets and general layout.


There must be another Limerick other than the one on the Shannon does not in any way look more like a city than Cork.

Paris conforms to a snail rather than a grid, does this mean it is also less of a city than Limerick?
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sun Jun 07, 2009 7:56 pm

mickeydocs wrote:There must be another Limerick other than the one on the Shannon does not in any way look more like a city than Cork.

Paris conforms to a snail rather than a grid, does this mean it is also less of a city than Limerick?


Well just because being built on a grid pattern contributes to a sense of being city-like, it doesn't mean that not being built on a grid pattern implies a place is not city-like. I know Cork people love to harp on about how they can challenge Dublin for supremacy. But, in reality, Cork has one really inelegant main street and a bunch of tiny streets coming off it. And the little stream running through it contributes to the sense of being in a smallish town. It reminds me of some place like Athlone or Tralee. Limerick is built on a very wide river and has wider streets. It may be an illusion, but my impression is of a bigger place. It's also got a lot more going for it in terms of historical attractions and potential. In short, Limerick is by any standards infinitely superior to Cork and the real second city of Ireland.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby mickeydocs » Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:32 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:Well just because being built on a grid pattern contributes to a sense of being city-like, it doesn't mean that not being built on a grid pattern implies a place is not city-like. I know Cork people love to harp on about how they can challenge Dublin for supremacy. But, in reality, Cork has one really inelegant main street and a bunch of tiny streets coming off it. And the little stream running through it contributes to the sense of being in a smallish town. It reminds me of some place like Athlone or Tralee. Limerick is built on a very wide river and has wider streets. It may be an illusion, but my impression is of a bigger place. It's also got a lot more going for it in terms of historical attractions and potential. In short, Limerick is by any standards infinitely superior to Cork and the real second city of Ireland.


Cheers rumpel... you are a wum.
No one in Cork talks about supremacy. We acknowledge that our town is a mid size provincial town that would at best be a suburb of London or Paris.

Our main thoroughfare is certainly not inelegant - try taking a look at some of the buildings. The South Mall is by far the nicest business street in the country.

The beauty of Cork for me is that it is a small town - but at almost three times the population of Limerick, a much bigger small town than Limerick. Cork is full of historical attractions, but of course you'd have to park your willingness to knock everything that Cork is before being able to take an objective look at my town.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby dave123 » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:04 pm

mickeydocs wrote:Cheers rumpel... you are a wum.
No one in Cork talks about supremacy. We acknowledge that our town is a mid size provincial town that would at best be a suburb of London or Paris.

Our main thoroughfare is certainly not inelegant - try taking a look at some of the buildings. The South Mall is by far the nicest business street in the country.

The beauty of Cork for me is that it is a small town - but at almost three times the population of Limerick, a much bigger small town than Limerick. Cork is full of historical attractions, but of course you'd have to park your willingness to knock everything that Cork is before being able to take an objective look at my town.



Mickey docks rather then been totally defensive, there are pros and cons going for both cities, though Limerick city centre is very impressive now considering it was one of the most run down cities in the country at one time.

Cork maybe a bigger town, doesnt give a whole lot more merit just for the size argument. The City of limerick is fairly large and simalar size of Corks. Thats when you combine Englishtown, Iriishtown, georgian quarter and the Riverfront. Limerick half the size of cork and the metropolitian area of Cork is bigger, so what. We are really talking about the architecture and cities image here. Limerick's population growth is growing faster than Cork in most of the previous censuses
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:15 pm

mickeydocs wrote:Cheers rumpel... you are a wum.
No one in Cork talks about supremacy. We acknowledge that our town is a mid size provincial town that would at best be a suburb of London or Paris.

Our main thoroughfare is certainly not inelegant - try taking a look at some of the buildings. The South Mall is by far the nicest business street in the country.

The beauty of Cork for me is that it is a small town - but at almost three times the population of Limerick, a much bigger small town than Limerick. Cork is full of historical attractions, but of course you'd have to park your willingness to knock everything that Cork is before being able to take an objective look at my town.


I personally think Patrick Street it too wide and full of ugly buildings. South Mall is, I will agree, a rather nice street but it has its fair share of ugly buildings too.

I've lived in both Limerick and Cork and enjoyed both cities. I'll admit that at present Cork is a more pleasant place to stroll around. However, when I lived there I found it really irritating that Cork people continually knocked Limerick as a dump that nobody could possibly want to visit, whereas Cork was "the real capital of Ireland."

The facts are these:
Limerick's extensive network of Georgian streets is better than Cork's collection of pleasant but nondescript 19th century buildings.
Limerick's St. Mary's Cathedral is infinitely more interesting than St. Colman's Cathedral.
Limerick's got a medieval castle which Cork does not.
Limerick's Hunt Museum is better than every museum in Cork put together.
Limerick's river has a certain epic sweep which Cork's tiny river lacks.
Cork has better coffee shops and a more laid back atmosphere.
Cork's market is infinitely better than Limerick's.
Cork's got a better cultural scene than Limerick.

Overall, Limerick is fundamentally a more beautiful city than Cork, but it's very grubby and people don't notice it. When Limerick cleans itself up it could be the most beautiful city in Ireland. Cork alas could never have that distinction.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:27 pm

And, btw, your statement that Cork has three times the population of Limerick is ridiculous.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby Cliff Barnes » Mon Jun 08, 2009 7:38 am

rumpelstiltskin wrote:I personally think Patrick Street it too wide and full of ugly buildings. South Mall is, I will agree, a rather nice street but it has its fair share of ugly buildings too.

I've lived in both Limerick and Cork and enjoyed both cities. I'll admit that at present Cork is a more pleasant place to stroll around. However, when I lived there I found it really irritating that Cork people continually knocked Limerick as a dump that nobody could possibly want to visit, whereas Cork was "the real capital of Ireland."

The facts are these:
Limerick's extensive network of Georgian streets is better than Cork's collection of pleasant but nondescript 19th century buildings.
Limerick's St. Mary's Cathedral is infinitely more interesting than St. Colman's Cathedral.
Limerick's got a medieval castle which Cork does not.
Limerick's Hunt Museum is better than every museum in Cork put together.
Limerick's river has a certain epic sweep which Cork's tiny river lacks.
Cork has better coffee shops and a more laid back atmosphere.
Cork's market is infinitely better than Limerick's.
Cork's got a better cultural scene than Limerick.

Overall, Limerick is fundamentally a more beautiful city than Cork, but it's very grubby and people don't notice it. When Limerick cleans itself up it could be the most beautiful city in Ireland. Cork alas could never have that distinction.


This has to be one of the funniest wums ever seeing as Cork is actually called "Beautiful City"

Corks network of pedestrianised streets,compact walkable city centre,bridges,port and harbour vistas,topography of its hills and feels more like continental French city than the English feel to Dublin and parts of Limerick that have the Georgian influence.

Introducing Cork City
Show mapClose map
Cork buzzes with the energy of a city that’s certain of its place in Ireland. Indeed, so confident is the former ‘Rebel City’ that locals only half-jokingly refer to it as the ‘People’s Republic of Cork’. The city has long been dismissive of Dublin and with a burgeoning arts, music and restaurant scene, it’s now getting a cultural reputation to rival the capital’s.

The River Lee flows around the centre, an island packed with grand Georgian parades, cramped 17th-century alleys and modern masterpieces such as the opera house. The flurry of urban renewal that began with the city’s stint in 2005 as European Capital of Culture continues apace, with new buildings, bars and arts centres springing up all over town. The best of the city is still happily traditional though – snug pubs with live music sessions most of the week, excellent local produce in an ever-expanding list of restaurants and a genuinely proud welcome from the locals.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby Angry Rebel » Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:17 am

If you're going to argue about population, ignore the census data. Both Cork and Limerick suffer from stupid city/county boundaries.

Limerick City Council have been more successful than most in the country at annexing county land.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby starchaser » Mon Jun 08, 2009 10:42 am

rumpelstiltskin wrote:Well just because being built on a grid pattern contributes to a sense of being city-like, it doesn't mean that not being built on a grid pattern implies a place is not city-like. I know Cork people love to harp on about how they can challenge Dublin for supremacy. But, in reality, Cork has one really inelegant main street and a bunch of tiny streets coming off it. And the little stream running through it contributes to the sense of being in a smallish town. It reminds me of some place like Athlone or Tralee. Limerick is built on a very wide river and has wider streets. It may be an illusion, but my impression is of a bigger place. It's also got a lot more going for it in terms of historical attractions and potential. In short, Limerick is by any standards infinitely superior to Cork and the real second city of Ireland.


Take a look at some of his other posts. This guy is just messing about.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Mon Jun 08, 2009 2:42 pm

Angry Rebel wrote:If you're going to argue about population, ignore the census data. Both Cork and Limerick suffer from stupid city/county boundaries.

Limerick City Council have been more successful than most in the country at annexing county land.


Considering there's a huge area of land down the road from the city centre called Castletroy which has a population of 35,000 and which is not within the city boundaries, I wouldn't agree with you.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Mon Jun 08, 2009 2:48 pm

Cliff Barnes wrote:This has to be one of the funniest wums ever seeing as Cork is actually called "Beautiful City"

Corks network of pedestrianised streets,compact walkable city centre,bridges,port and harbour vistas,topography of its hills and feels more like continental French city than the English feel to Dublin and parts of Limerick that have the Georgian influence.

Introducing Cork City
Show mapClose map
Cork buzzes with the energy of a city that’s certain of its place in Ireland. Indeed, so confident is the former ‘Rebel City’ that locals only half-jokingly refer to it as the ‘People’s Republic of Cork’. The city has long been dismissive of Dublin and with a burgeoning arts, music and restaurant scene, it’s now getting a cultural reputation to rival the capital’s.

The River Lee flows around the centre, an island packed with grand Georgian parades, cramped 17th-century alleys and modern masterpieces such as the opera house. The flurry of urban renewal that began with the city’s stint in 2005 as European Capital of Culture continues apace, with new buildings, bars and arts centres springing up all over town. The best of the city is still happily traditional though – snug pubs with live music sessions most of the week, excellent local produce in an ever-expanding list of restaurants and a genuinely proud welcome from the locals.


Ok, list all the "grand Georgian parades". And 17th century alleys? Is there one 17th building left in the whole of Cork? And does anybody really think the Opera House is a masterpiece of modern architecture? On an architectural forum of all places?
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Re: Off-Topic Trolling

Postby green_jesus » Mon Jun 08, 2009 3:00 pm

Oh Yeah?, Well my Dad's bigger than your Dad so there! :p
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby jungle » Mon Jun 08, 2009 3:20 pm

mickeydocs wrote:How many pedestrian streets do you want (Paul Street, Princes Street, Winthrop St. Oliver Plunket St. (partial), etc.)? Cork led the way in relation to this almost 30 years ago.


Trying to ignore the Cork v Limerick fight, I'll run back to this comment.

To my mind pedestrianised streets are not entirely good things. They have a tendency to become deserted and unused after dark.

But what I would like to see is more areas like Oliver Plunkett St, which is pedestrianised during shopping hours, but then opened up to cars outside them. I'd also like to see private cars off Pana.

There are certainly some candidate streets for pedestrianisation or at least partial pedestrianisation - Castle St, Liberty St, Cross St, Hanover St, Drawbridge St.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby starchaser » Mon Jun 08, 2009 6:24 pm

i know people living in castletroy. right shower of langers. complete wooley backs. consider themselves limerick "schitty" people alright :)
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby mickeydocs » Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:26 pm

dave123 wrote:Mickey docks rather then been totally defensive, there are pros and cons going for both cities, though Limerick city centre is very impressive now considering it was one of the most run down cities in the country at one time.

Cork maybe a bigger town, doesnt give a whole lot more merit just for the size argument. The City of limerick is fairly large and simalar size of Corks. Thats when you combine Englishtown, Iriishtown, georgian quarter and the Riverfront. Limerick half the size of cork and the metropolitian area of Cork is bigger, so what. We are really talking about the architecture and cities image here. Limerick's population growth is growing faster than Cork in most of the previous censuses


http://beyond2020.cso.ie/Census/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=75467
Dave, according to this Limerick city declined 2.7% and Cork city by 3%, so I'm not sure where you are getting teh 'growing faster than' information. The population of County Limerick has seen significant growth of 8.4% but this is well behind the 11% growth in County Cork (main growth area is great Cork). These are figures from the CSO, but maybe you'll argue that there was a rugby game on that day (of course Munster fans only come from Limerick).

The two cities are incomparable size wise and population wise. Cork plus suburbs is approximately 200k, Limerick plus suburbs 90k. Greater Cork is over 300k, Greater Limerick 125k. This may not be three times the population, but not too far away from three times.

The interpretation of aesthetics is subjective. Limerick doesn't have an equivalent of the South Mall or Grand Parade, and Patrick Street is what O'Connell Street would like to be.

However before descending any further into tribalism shall I just point out that my family are originally from Adare in Co. Limerick so we have a certain amount of respect for that County...
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Mon Jun 08, 2009 10:24 pm

mickeydocs wrote:http://beyond2020.cso.ie/Census/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=75467
Dave, according to this Limerick city declined 2.7% and Cork city by 3%, so I'm not sure where you are getting teh 'growing faster than' information. The population of County Limerick has seen significant growth of 8.4% but this is well behind the 11% growth in County Cork (main growth area is great Cork). These are figures from the CSO, but maybe you'll argue that there was a rugby game on that day (of course Munster fans only come from Limerick).

The two cities are incomparable size wise and population wise. Cork plus suburbs is approximately 200k, Limerick plus suburbs 90k. Greater Cork is over 300k, Greater Limerick 125k. This may not be three times the population, but not too far away from three times.

The interpretation of aesthetics is subjective. Limerick doesn't have an equivalent of the South Mall or Grand Parade, and Patrick Street is what O'Connell Street would like to be.

However before descending any further into tribalism shall I just point out that my family are originally from Adare in Co. Limerick so we have a certain amount of respect for that County...


Ok, I suppose it's a matter of opinion which city is 'nicer'. But I will have to challenge you on your assertions about Cork's population. What the f*** is "Greater Cork" if you don't mind me asking? According to the Wikipedia article about it, undoubtedly written by some drunken Corkman the same night he pulled it out of his arse, it includes Youghal? Lol. Youghal!!! And Mallow!!!! Parts of Cork city? In that case, we'll include Ennis and Nenagh and Tipperary and Newcastle West as parts of Limerick city will we? Even including Midleton as part of Cork City is ridiculous. If you're going to do that you'll have to revise your figures for Limerick's population including everything out to Shannon airport and everything as far as Rathkeale. And 20km into Tipperary as well. In fact, the city of Cork is about 190,000 and Limerick is about 91,000. That means it's a little over twice the size. So stop compensating for your other shortcomings.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby dave123 » Tue Jun 09, 2009 12:09 am

mickeydocs wrote:http://beyond2020.cso.ie/Census/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=75467
Dave, according to this Limerick city declined 2.7% and Cork city by 3%, so I'm not sure where you are getting teh 'growing faster than' information. The population of County Limerick has seen significant growth of 8.4% but this is well behind the 11% growth in County Cork (main growth area is great Cork). These are figures from the CSO, but maybe you'll argue that there was a rugby game on that day (of course Munster fans only come from Limerick).


Limerick city has grown faster than cork, which includes city and suburbs of both cities. In both this census and last census. There is still much inaccuracy in the Limerick results since thousands left the city that very day for the Munster match imo.

Btw Limerick metropolitician population actually contributes the burgeoning growth of North Cork, since Charelville is on the border and is now dorimotory town to Limerick city. look at the amount of limerick developers have built around the town... Limerick agglomeration is also responsible for Making North Tipp growing by 8.7% almost 6percent more than the previous census. Limerick is severely underbouded in so many aspects.
The two cities are incomparable size wise and population wise. Cork plus suburbs is approximately 200k, Limerick plus suburbs 90k. Greater Cork is over 300k, Greater Limerick 125k. This may not be three times the population, but not too far away from three times.
If your going to quote figures, can you actually stick to the facts and not bullshit me please.

Cork is 190,000 and LImerick is 91,000. Not Limerick 90,000 and Cork 200,000. See I'm giving a balanced view even though im backing up Limerick. Whereas you are blowing up artificial figures off your head. Greater Limerick is actually 213,000. Cork is 250,000..:rolleyes:

Ennis has a population of 30,000.... and planned population of 70,000 like Drogheha and is one of the fastest growing towns in this country. and is only 20miles from Limerick.

Nenagh has a population of 7,500, and has one of the fastest growth rate in the country. Limerick is has a growth rate of 8.4 percent slightly lower than Corks, because Limerick's agglomeration is spilling into three counties..... Thats the difference.
The interpretation of aesthetics is subjective. Limerick doesn't have an equivalent of the South Mall or Grand Parade, and Patrick Street is what O'Connell Street would like to be.

Cork doesn't have a grid street network and a old medievel english town network does it? O'Connell street doesnt need to Model Cork, it has always been the agenda to improve this street but its going ahead when the City ring road is completed.

However before descending any further into tribalism shall I just point out that my family are originally from Adare in Co. Limerick so we have a certain amount of respect for that County...


Well I'm not from Limerick but I'm not here to champion Limerick, just want to straighten out your facts and make them appear less tribal.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby Angry Rebel » Tue Jun 09, 2009 1:56 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:Considering there's a huge area of land down the road from the city centre called Castletroy which has a population of 35,000 and which is not within the city boundaries, I wouldn't agree with you.


Please read the original comment. Did I say they had done everything they needed to? No. I just said they had been more successful than most. Have they been more successful or not? Or to narrow it even further, down to the "topic" being "debated" here (this is my last contribution to this pointlessness), have they been more or less successful than Cork in amending the city/county boundaries?

I'll give you a hint to get you going...Cork has achieved nothing.
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby PTB » Tue Jun 09, 2009 2:56 pm

Jesus lads, can we not just pair up and take the piss out of Dublin?
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby Cliff Barnes » Tue Jun 09, 2009 3:15 pm

PTB wrote:Jesus lads, can we not just pair up and take the piss out of Dublin?


Thats way too easy.

We have to stick to the "My Dads car can go faster than your Dads car" argument
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Re: Developments in Cork

Postby mickeydocs » Wed Jun 10, 2009 10:02 am

dave123 wrote:Limerick city has grown faster than cork, which includes city and suburbs of both cities. In both this census and last census. There is still much inaccuracy in the Limerick results since thousands left the city that very day for the Munster match imo.

Btw Limerick metropolitician population actually contributes the burgeoning growth of North Cork, since Charelville is on the border and is now dorimotory town to Limerick city. look at the amount of limerick developers have built around the town... Limerick agglomeration is also responsible for Making North Tipp growing by 8.7% almost 6percent more than the previous census. Limerick is severely underbouded in so many aspects.
If your going to quote figures, can you actually stick to the facts and not bullshit me please.

Cork is 190,000 and LImerick is 91,000. Not Limerick 90,000 and Cork 200,000. See I'm giving a balanced view even though im backing up Limerick. Whereas you are blowing up artificial figures off your head. Greater Limerick is actually 213,000. Cork is 250,000..:rolleyes:

Ennis has a population of 30,000.... and planned population of 70,000 like Drogheha and is one of the fastest growing towns in this country. and is only 20miles from Limerick.

Nenagh has a population of 7,500, and has one of the fastest growth rate in the country. Limerick is has a growth rate of 8.4 percent slightly lower than Corks, because Limerick's agglomeration is spilling into three counties..... Thats the difference.

Cork doesn't have a grid street network and a old medievel english town network does it? O'Connell street doesnt need to Model Cork, it has always been the agenda to improve this street but its going ahead when the City ring road is completed.



Well I'm not from Limerick but I'm not here to champion Limerick, just want to straighten out your facts and make them appear less tribal.



I'm convinced you are on drugs as you exist in a parallel universe. The census is not arbitrary. The growth rates for the 'greater' areas of Limerick that spill into other counties is below 10%. The suburban area of Cork is growing at 12%, only greater Dublin grows faster than this.
Cork is not an area in decline, it is an area with a very quickly changing demographic, moving from city core to a greater metropolitan hub. The greater area is in excess of 300,000, and the radius is never greater than 20 miles. What is the radius for greater Limerick?
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