Cork Transport

Re: Cork Transport

Postby A-ha » Fri Jul 21, 2006 9:54 pm

I read today in the Echo that easyJet are pulling out of the Irish market. From September 30th, all flights from Cork, Shannon and Knock will cease. The airline said that Cork was their best Irish route with the highest amount of passengers, but the airline couldn't compete with Ryanair who flies to both London's Gatwick and Stansted airports as well as Aer Lingus' flights to Heathrow.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby a boyle » Fri Jul 21, 2006 11:07 pm

who were these people crowing about corks sizeable population , supporting a local airport ?

You need a single airport for the eastern side of ireland. not two half proper ones plus 3/4 subsidized joke ones.

Your money would be better spent on decent rail links to and from shannon and much improved bus links.

What is the point of a cork airport , convenient as it is to kerry and the local industry , if few companies will fly there ?

Remember a proper rail link to shannon would put it at a 40 minute trip . From dublins point of view that is a stones throw .

clearly i am wrong . a small airport serving london that is ten minutes away is much much better that a large airport fourty minutes away serving all the destinations that dublin airport does and more .


Risible.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby Hoggy » Sat Jul 22, 2006 12:04 am

a boyle wrote:who were these people crowing about corks sizeable population , supporting a local airport ?

You need a single airport for the eastern side of ireland. not two half proper ones plus 3/4 subsidized joke ones.

Your money would be better spent on decent rail links to and from shannon and much improved bus links.

What is the point of a cork airport , convenient as it is to kerry and the local industry , if few companies will fly there ?

Remember a proper rail link to shannon would put it at a 40 minute trip . From dublins point of view that is a stones throw .

clearly i am wrong . a small airport serving london that is ten minutes away is much much better that a large airport fourty minutes away serving all the destinations that dublin airport does and more .


Risible.


I cant see your argument about population size at all.If you were to base an airports viability on population alone then shannon would be the one to close in the morning.

I also seriously doubt that Shannon serves more destinations than Dublin,and im pretty sure that Cork actually serves more destinations than Shannon but correct me if im wrong
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby a boyle » Sat Jul 22, 2006 12:15 am

no hoggy you missed the point entirely . Shannon is near to both galway limerick and cork. So if you spend money on decent rail infrastructure linking the three towns to shannon then shannon has a much bigger catchement population . You stop subsidises such jokes as knock and kerry international airport, and close cork , because if you can get shannon dealing with a sufficient number of poeple then it becomes economical to open routes to many new places. If you spend money on top notch trains and buses feeding into shannon then everyone ends up at least a little bit better off, but most poeple end up a lot better off.

Cork is simply too far from galway and galway is simply to far from cork .shannon is bang in the middle .


It is the same as dunnes stores on the southern ring road compared to the spar/centre round the corner. dunnes is much bigger , and further away from most than the local spar , but every one is willing to drive to it.

Not rocket science ,common sence.

Trully risible that a new terminal is opening up and a company is pulling out of cork.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby A-ha » Sat Jul 22, 2006 12:44 am

Don't forget that they are pulling out of Shannon aswell. And please a boyle, end the whole "make Shannon a super airport" thing, because really, I'm not the only one that is sick and tired of your opinions. You say Shannon is bang in the middle, but what airport is more central if you live in Kerry, Tipperary, Kilkenny or Waterford.... I would imagine that it's Cork. I'm not for airport bashing.... but when you carry on for so long about such a ridiculous idea, then someone must put a stop to it. We've heard your views on Shannon since the forum began, now if you could just manage to start talking about some other area of CORK transport, then I'm sure we would all get along fine.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby a boyle » Sat Jul 22, 2006 12:55 am

no problem .

As i alluded to in another thread. how is it possible that cork city has lost population in this new census.

What hope is there of ever getting improvements in transport if people are ever moving further to the suburbs , where it is fiercesomely hard to provide for them? reversing that trend ought to be the top priority of cork galway ,limerick and dublin.

There is no chance of things like a light rail happening in cork without addressing this .
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby A-ha » Sat Jul 22, 2006 1:12 am

a boyle wrote:As i alluded to in another thread. how is it possible that cork city has lost population in this new census.


It happened the same way it did in Limerick, out-dated boundaries. a boyle, you make it sound as if emigration from the city to the suburbs is unique to Cork. I believe it goes on in most cities]There is no chance of things like a light rail happening in cork without addressing this .[/QUOTE]

Maybe not light rail as in a tram, which I would be strongly opposed to if it were a Luas style system, but the Cork Suburban Rail is being extended into the suburbs and satellite towns right now. I believe it's called planning ahead. For the fun of it, let me call out the suburbs of Cork that by 2008 will all be connected by suburban rail. Starting off - to the east we have Dunkettle, Little Island, Glounthaune, Fota, Carrigaloe, Ballynoe, Rushbrooke and Cobh with a branch of at Glounthaune to Carrigtwohill and Midleton. To the North, from Kent station we have Kilbarry, Monard, Blarney and Mallow. It's not highly extensive, but it's relied on by the thousands that come into Cork every day by train, whether it be for school, work or shopping.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby a boyle » Sat Jul 22, 2006 1:33 am

no what ireland is experiencing is not a normal course of events.

It is one thing to have suburbs spreading like mad , but normally these would occur because you would have such an increase in demand for housing in the city itself.

So in taking the census you would hope that while the suburbs might grow by 40000 , the city would grow by 150000. and when doing it in percentage , based on the population in situ you would hope the city would increase in population by 10 percent while the suburbs grow by 5 percent.

What we have is what is happening in old american cities like detroit that are in perpetually decline. It is something that is completely against any normal healthy growth in a country.

Argueing that the city boundaries are now outdated is only accepting defeat, and doens't acheive much. We have a situation in dublin and undoubtedly in cork limerick and galway, where city schools are closing, due to lack of numbers and whole blank areas in meath kildare louth wicklow have not half enough schools , hospitals etc.

The whole point of a planning system is to put people where you can cope with them . We seem to have gone for putting the masses in the countryside instead of the city , which is ruly thick way of managing the growth in the country. It is the single reason for so much traffic on your lovely ring road. Because believe it or not we have relatively few cars per person in this country.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby mickeydocs » Sat Jul 22, 2006 11:42 am

A Boyle, do you ever look at facts before starting your rant.

Facts, Cork City and Limerick City both declined in population during the period 2002 to 2006. Dublin City grew by just 2%. Galway grew by 9%.

Does this mean that Galway's growth is outpacing the rest of the country?
Look again at the facts. Areas around Cork, Dublin and Limerick are growing by ridiculous amounts, in someplaces by up to 30%. The population of Co. Cork grew to just under half a million in this census with a growth rate of over 11%. The Dublin region grew by just 5.6%.

Surely a growth rate such as this undermines a need for a metro in Dublin???

Now let's take your point that Cork and Limerick are in perpetual decline similar to Detroit. Once again I presume you didn't take a close look at the figures, just the summary headlines.

If you look at page 11 on the CSO Report you will see a paragraph that states that decline in population in areas such as Cork, Waterford and Dublin is attributed to "a combination of factors including adult children leaving the family home, urban renewal schemes and regeneration projecs involving the demolition of older housing. In addition many of the infill developments in city areas consisted of apartment blocks in which individual units catered for only one or two persons".

Other factors cited are "relatively low level of new housing and an ageing population".

So what we are seeing in the traditional city areas are changing demographics. Traditional working class areas are experiencing steady population decline due to an ageing population, children leaving the family home, and smaller family units.

Ballinlough has seen a population decline of 51%. Hmmm, why is that. Obviously terminal decline of a city... no, in fact this represents students leaving a traditional student area to live in accomodation provided by colleges.

Blackpool - 27%... maybe the fact that the whole of Blackpool is a construction site has something to do with this.

Togher - 17%... ageing working class area, children moving on.

However, if we look at the towns surrounding Cork, for example Midleton, Carrigaline, Douglas, Ballincollig, etc,
we see growth rates of approximately 15%, in towns that are alreay quite populous. So are the inhabitants of this town partaking of too much viagra leading to huge baby booms, well I'm sure that quite a few of these new inhabitants are from Ballinlough, Togher, and Blackpool.

Probably best to just look at the summary headline and reach conclusions though.

Please move on to a new topic A Boyle, you are a very tiresome contributor.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby a boyle » Sat Jul 22, 2006 12:53 pm

i cannot understand you. are have backed up my point , and yet dispute it with me . all the cities are sufferring from decline or relative decline while the suburbs are thriving .

You confirm this. I merely point out that this type development is seen in the cities of america which are either in decline (detroit)/or might as well be they are so horrid (los angeles)

I don't care if every body is getting on in age in cork, they point blank should not be moving to the suburbs. , you have an entire swathes of land in or at least close to the city ripe for housing . cork has seen the opening of several out of town centres , after dublin conprehensively tested them in tallaght liffey and blanch . Each one is more depressing and shite than the next.

Again that is a pattern of development we have borrowed from the americans.

Now having said all this , go to an american city (not new york) have a look at how transport works . It is dire.

This entire discussion on cork transport is completely irrelevent unless you begin to look at the basics. sure you had a wonderfull ring road with tunnel. now only a few years in operation it is jammed.

I note with some scorn that while all this cork lads are happy to knock my ramblings , not a single counter suggestion .
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby phatman » Sat Jul 22, 2006 1:36 pm

Serving the entire western seaboard with a single 'super' airport, as sustainable or clever as it lmight look to some people on paper, is simply not feasible. First of all to close Cork airport would prove detrimental to the economy of the region. Secondly, and more practically, you simply cannot change peoples travel patterns so easily. Those who travel by car to Cork airport would most likely travel to Shannon by car, regardless of the possibility of a rail link. By merging the existing airports into one airport, you are obviously expanding hugely the rural hinterland being served, the majority of people being car dependant and much too far removed from the rail network to even consider using it. So, with the exception of your jet setting young urban professionals, a rail link to an airport so far removed would do nothing to justify such a move. The lack of an airport in Cork would further rule out the possibility of air-commuting between Cork and Dublin, and for that matter between Cork and the U.K. Cork is a city of such a size, and is such an important contributor to the Irish economy, as well as being an important toutism gateway, that people want to fly directly there, not have to travel half way across the country to get there. Cities much smaller than Cork support their own airports. And as for the whole argument of the range of destinations being unsatisfactory, the airport is not purporting to be anything more than it is, and obviously the supply is there to simply meet the demand, in which case it is fulfilling its purpose. Save a US route, I can't see any problems, and if there is a deficiency somewhere, I'm sure the new terminal will allow for increased service where necessary, and suceed in attracting new airlines.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby MrX » Sat Jul 22, 2006 1:50 pm

Cork (and Limerick) cities have seriously tight boundries, much more so than Dublin. The fact that there's development land close to the city centre wouldn't actually improve the population statistics. There is practically no land available for development within the city council area that isn't in some other sort of use. Even relatively close parts of the outskirts of Douglas are in County Cork.

The population decline's purely a misrepresentation of raw statistics by news outlets.

As for Cork being near Shannon airport ? Where did you get that idea? There's NO WAY you could link Cork to Shannon in 40 mins, even with 125 mph trians you'd be looking at over an hour.

It's 75 miles / 120 KM suggesting that using Shannon would be even remotely accessible from Cork is a stretch of the imagination.

Shannon's 86.6KM from Glaway (an hours drive) and only 20KM from Limerick. So, yes those two places do fall within its catchement area, although Galway's highly marginal.

Also, Cork doesn't just serve London... it has a huge range of direct destinations. All that shannon has is a couple of artificially created transatlantic routes which, when open skies happen may well disappear anyway with the end of the Stopover.

Directly serves:
Amsterdam Aer Lingus
Alicante Aer Lingus
Barcelona Aer Lingus
Belfast Aer Arann
Birmingham Aer Arann
Birmingham bmi baby
Bristol Aer Arann
Budapest Malev
Cardiff bmi baby
Dublin Aer Arann
Durham Tees Valley bmi baby
Edinburgh Aer Arann
Glasgow Loganair
Leeds Bradford Aer Arann
Liverpool Ryanair
London Gatwick Easyjet
London Heathrow Aer Lingus
London Stansted Ryanair
Malaga Aer Lingus
Manchester bmi baby
Munich Aer Lingus
Newcastle Jet2.com
Nice Aer Lingus
Paris Aer Lingus
Prague Czech Airlines
Rome Aer Lingus
Southampton Aer Arann
Warsaw Aer Lingus


And just added:

Gdansk - Wizz Air
Krakow - Central Wings
Wroclaw - Centarl Wings
Galway - Aer Arran
Leeds - Aer Arran
Birmingham - Aer Lingus
Berlin - Aer Lingus
Madrid - Aer Lingus
Prague - Aer Lingus
Lanzorate - Aer Lingus
Tenerife - Aer Lingus
Katwice - Wizz Air
Nantes - Aer Arran
Lorient - Aer Arran

Easy Transatlatnic access via : LHR, Gatwick, Paris Charles de Gaul and Amsterdam --- it takes less time than going via Dublin or Shannon over land!


As for the Cork population, it's got a metro area approaching 300,000 people.

You'll see the city's core population starting to grow a little I think when some of these new docklands developments take off. The simple fact is that Cork city has very limited housing stock within the city bounds itself and what is there is either very mature corporation estates or extremely pricy inner suburbs that are out of the reach of your average first time buyer by a long shot.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby dave123 » Sun Jul 23, 2006 4:40 am

MrX wrote:Cork (and Limerick) cities have seriously tight boundries, much more so than Dublin. The fact that there's development land close to the city centre wouldn't actually improve the population statistics. There is practically no land available for development within the city council area that isn't in some other sort of use. Even relatively close parts of the outskirts of Douglas are in County Cork.

The population decline's purely a misrepresentation of raw statistics by news outlets.

As for Cork being near Shannon airport ? Where did you get that idea? There's NO WAY you could link Cork to Shannon in 40 mins, even with 125 mph trians you'd be looking at over an hour.

It's 75 miles / 120 KM suggesting that using Shannon would be even remotely accessible from Cork is a stretch of the imagination.

Shannon's 86.6KM from Glaway (an hours drive) and only 20KM from Limerick. So, yes those two places do fall within its catchement area, although Galway's highly marginal.

Also, Cork doesn't just serve London... it has a huge range of direct destinations. All that shannon has is a couple of artificially created transatlantic routes which, when open skies happen may well disappear anyway with the end of the Stopover.

Directly serves:
Amsterdam Aer Lingus
Alicante Aer Lingus
Barcelona Aer Lingus
Belfast Aer Arann
Birmingham Aer Arann
Birmingham bmi baby
Bristol Aer Arann
Budapest Malev
Cardiff bmi baby
Dublin Aer Arann
Durham Tees Valley bmi baby
Edinburgh Aer Arann
Glasgow Loganair
Leeds Bradford Aer Arann
Liverpool Ryanair
London Gatwick Easyjet
London Heathrow Aer Lingus
London Stansted Ryanair
Malaga Aer Lingus
Manchester bmi baby
Munich Aer Lingus
Newcastle Jet2.com
Nice Aer Lingus
Paris Aer Lingus
Prague Czech Airlines
Rome Aer Lingus
Southampton Aer Arann
Warsaw Aer Lingus


And just added:

Gdansk - Wizz Air
Krakow - Central Wings
Wroclaw - Centarl Wings
Galway - Aer Arran
Leeds - Aer Arran
Birmingham - Aer Lingus
Berlin - Aer Lingus
Madrid - Aer Lingus
Prague - Aer Lingus
Lanzorate - Aer Lingus
Tenerife - Aer Lingus
Katwice - Wizz Air
Nantes - Aer Arran
Lorient - Aer Arran

Easy Transatlatnic access via : LHR, Gatwick, Paris Charles de Gaul and Amsterdam --- it takes less time than going via Dublin or Shannon over land!


As for the Cork population, it's got a metro area approaching 300,000 people.

You'll see the city's core population starting to grow a little I think when some of these new docklands developments take off. The simple fact is that Cork city has very limited housing stock within the city bounds itself and what is there is either very mature corporation estates or extremely pricy inner suburbs that are out of the reach of your average first time buyer by a long shot.


I am not getting into the debate that Cork should lose its airport... Nevertheless, Shannon does seem to be more economically located than say, Cork due to greater access to the regions... It is a superb location between all the major centres, to be fair,

Aha mentioned that Tipperary commuters would op for Cork rather than Shannon, I highly doubt that. I would say 99.5% percent of North Tipperary people would use Shannon Airport, for the obvious reason it is closer and is bigger. Likewise, same way that south Tipperary would probably op for Cork as it's to do with location, so it attracts more numbers from S.T. However, places like Clonmel and Waterford could easily choose to travel en route - Dublin or Shannon. There is not a big difference in mileage for the southeast to travel to any of the main Airports= Shannon, Cork and Dublin, if anything would be more direct going straight up the N24 imo. Alternatively, go to Dublin,
Overall, Shannon is in easy reach to all major centres, Cork is peripheral (edged) to urban centres. On the other hand, Cork does have a large Metro area to have an airport in its own right..., which is a good argument for Cork. Therefore, I think it would be a huge loss to the Cork region if it were to lose its airbase; I would be surprised if it ever happened.
The reality is it won’t happen; Don’t think it would occur to any one’s mind of the likelihood, even if Shannon had a super Airport connected with high speed lines to the cities.
Though, Speaking of Metro regions
Suburban population sprawl between the catchments of either Cork or Shannon airport... If we, take the example of where the most of the growth is happening. Which is Shannon. My reasons.
Look at the population explosion between Limerick and Galway in the last few years,
The population around the periphery of Shannon airport will be served by the local demands easily competing Cork, even when the stopover is axed, so to put it into another perspective. Population is growing faster within an hours drive from Shannon, than let's say an hour’s drive from Cork and this trend will continue.

Southern Galway population is in the catchments of Shannon Airport. Moreover, is growing quite fast and in the direction Of Shannon. In addition, swallowing up towns like Gort. The sprawl is just 35 minutes from Shannon. As we know, Limerick/Shannon is a hub with Shannon Airport located, so we know the Airport is part of the Metro. . So technically, you have two Metros that are approaching Shannon, though Galway on a lesser scale, as its region in its own right.

Cork Airport is closer to Cork, which is a plus, but in recent demography’s of the region, Cork is expanding in a northerly and easterly direction in recent years, more so than south where growth always concentrated around Bishopstown, Douglas, and Carrigaline etc. though there are growing, I'm just pointing out an aspect of change. With the recent upgrades like the Lee tunnel, and N8 upgrades etc, are partly the blame I'd imagine.

Therefore, Movement of Population would also determine the location of an airport.

It would be disastrous if Cork was given authority and status over Shannon IMO, if it came down to one airport. I.e. Cork being favoured as number 1, which I would strongly disagree.
You will have all the large urban centres travelling down to the far south. This would create more congestion and more problems, and wouldn't make economical sense, so I can see some of Boyle Ideas.


Look at the N18 corridor and you will see. The population distribution is obviously going to back up keeping Shannon in the long run. Now with the proposed rail link to the new Limerick to Ennis Line (eventually linking up with Galway by 2011- 2015) and the plans to upgrade the N18, this furthers that Shannon Airport is sustainable.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby mickeydocs » Sun Jul 23, 2006 12:47 pm

What 's your point?

A Boyle is full of it, and right now he's just stirring trouble.
Cork contributes one third of the states gdp and represents one eight of the population.
The Greater Cork region is the fastest growing region in Munster (almost 12%).
There has been a significant investment in Cork because it is by far and away the state's second most populous area. The greater Cork area is now an area of 300,000 people and growing. This is far in excess of the combined greater areas of Galway, Limerick, Ennis, and Shannon combined.

One airport serving the Western sea board is not going to happen. Open skies will reverse the disproportionate state aid that has been propping Shannon up for the past fifty years. Cork will have transatlatic routes in the next 24 months, and another significant slice of the population that keeps Shannon going will have been removed.

I believe that Cork is now deserving of a tax free area similar to the tax free zone that has served Shannon. Time for a bit of a level playing field for all regions equal to its contribution to the state.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby jungle » Sun Jul 23, 2006 1:31 pm

dave123->I don't think anyone in Cork would wish to see Shannon closed down. Somewhere further back in this debate I made a point that closing Cork down would give Shannon a monopoly, which would be bad for customers. The same applies in reverse.

Following this logic, it is best not to view the airports as having unique catchment areas. Although people in close proximity to the airport will probably chose to fly from their local airport and probably connect, for people who lie between the airports, a number of factors will be taken into account. For example, I have a large number of relatives in Waterford. If a direct flight is available from Waterford, they will use it. After that, Cork is their airport of choice. However, they will use Shannon and Dublin too. A number of factors, including route availability and price will be taken into account and a choice made as a result. The fact that people like them have a choice is a good way of keeping the airports on their toes, even if a properly competitive situation is still pending.

Anyway, I'm considering requesting that all this talk of a single West Coast airport be put into a thread of its own. It is not entirely pertinent to the question of transport in Cork and serious points about public transport and the road network are getting drowned in the constant arguing on this point. Any opinions?
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby A-ha » Sun Jul 23, 2006 7:09 pm

I agree with jungle and mickeydocs. Common sense should be at the forefront of this thread to put an end to time wasting. Talking about Cork airport is fine, but obviously in moderation. Forgot to say it, but I read that the Kinsale Road flyover will be finished in the next few weeks, a whole 7 months ahead of schedule. Good news or what!
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby PVC King » Sun Jul 23, 2006 7:32 pm

It is good news the junction created chaos on the route at peak times and completion when it happens must be welcomed.

In relation to the comments re Cork Airport I totally agree and have started another thread for that discussion i.e. Shannon vs Cork and Aberdeen

There are much more pressing matters in hand such as the road network and the state of public transport not to mention the new terminal which should not be obscured by going too far off topic.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby shanks » Tue Jul 25, 2006 2:12 pm

I read on last night's Echo that a proposed route for the North Ring road is being announced. Does anyone have any details, or better still, a map?
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby PVC King » Tue Jul 25, 2006 2:41 pm

Funny that as Transport 21 has no record of it whatsoever. Although I believe that the N25 is due to be upgraded.

Whilst a route may be unveiled there is no money in the pot for it to be built for at least another decade
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby a boyle » Tue Jul 25, 2006 2:45 pm

could we please stop refering to transport 21.

giving the government's top twenty pork chops for the country a name gives the list a veneer of thought and competence.

a list does not constitute a plan.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby shanks » Tue Jul 25, 2006 3:02 pm

I think it was presented to city/county? councillors this morning and will be displayed to the public this afternoon in the Commons Inn and some other hotel tomorrow. If someone has a copy of yesterday's Echo lying around, the article is on the bottom of page 2!

It will be many years before this is built (if ever) but I'm curious about any proposed route due to the hilly nature of the terrain out there.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby PVC King » Tue Jul 25, 2006 3:44 pm

Pre-election stunt
There are bigger priorities as far as I'm concerned such as keeping debt at a realistic level at the airport and improving public transport
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby jungle » Tue Jul 25, 2006 6:29 pm

Two observations

There have been some roadworks recently on Leitrim St and Hardwicke St. The standard of repair done afterwards is apalling. I've long noticed that contractors in Cork seem to leave the road in a terrible state compared to what I've seen in Dublin or the UK. Is this because they are allowed to do this, but that contractors in other locations are more considerate or is there a serious enforcement problem in Cork City Council.

And on the subject of enforcement... On a quick trip through the city centre today, I came across cars and trucks that were parked on double yellow lines on South Main St and Barrack St. As the city council is so determined to clamp and tow people who overstay in legitimate spaces, why are they allowing these vehicles, which are serious obstructions and possibly even a road safety problem to remain.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby A-ha » Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:00 am

Air Baltic are operating flights from Cork to Riga for the August bank holiday week-end to provide an insight into the viability of the route. Also a new airline based in Gibraltar called FlyGibraltar has plans to start flights from the British Overseas Territorty to both Dublin and Cork from April 2007, although booking should be available by October. As far as I know, these would be the first flights from Gibraltar to any destination in Ireland.
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Re: Cork Transport

Postby phatman » Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:38 am

A-ha wrote:Air Baltic are operating flights from Cork to Riga for the August bank holiday week-end to provide an insight into the viability of the route. Also a new airline based in Gibraltar called FlyGibraltar has plans to start flights from the British Overseas Territorty to both Dublin and Cork from April 2007, although booking should be available by October. As far as I know, these would be the first flights from Gibraltar to any destination in Ireland.


Seeing as to land a plane in Gribraltar the main road from Spain has to be closed, one might appreciate that it's not the busiest airport! So I'm surprised at this move. :D
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