New Advertising in Dublin

Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby lostexpectation » Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:29 pm

'the proposer' :)
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby GrahamH » Sat Mar 03, 2007 4:39 am

A more detailed description of one of the new toilet units, seemingly including a pissoir, is given on-site at the College Green island, where the existing toilets are to be filled in and extensively built upon with an 'open pavilion' containing, well, all of the below:

Image

It ought to be borne in mind that this is a sensitive site in front of the Lords portico - we could do without anything overly bulky here that would intrude on views from College Street/Pearse Street.

A description of the toliet from the linked doc above:

After each use, the toilet floor is sprayed clean with high pressure water jets, while the toilet bowl retracts into a wall compartment where it is sprayed clean, disinfected and air-dried. The bowl washing and floor cleaning functions are fully automated using a design which was created by the proposer and is patented. The design uses very few moving parts, which reduces the likelihood of mechanical failure and is totally efficient.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby hutton » Sat Mar 03, 2007 3:18 pm

Gosh, theres an interesting difference - note how the proposal has come thru via part 8, as opposed to the applicant applying to DCC as has been the case with the commercially lucretive billboards. Whys that I wonder :confused: :rolleyes:

GrahamH wrote:It ought to be borne in mind that this is a sensitive site in front of the Lords portico - we could do without anything overly bulky here that would intrude on views from College Street/Pearse Street.


Yep, yer spot on there. But then again toilets and bikes are really the aim of this deal :rolleyes:

A description of procedures to follow after a days trading has also in effect been provided:

"Unique" contract wrote: After each use, hands should be sprayed clean with high pressure water jets, while interesting contract retract out of sight and is not to be shown to elected representatives . The details of said contract are are fully automated using a design which was created by the proposer and is "commerrfcially sensitive" should any councilor request. The plan uses very basic parts, which reduces the likelihood of failure and is totally efficient.


Now isn't that helpful - or am I just, eh, "taking the piss" :p

The sad reality is the above is peculiarly close to the truth - despite the unmandated contract being already signed, Ciaran NacNamara refuses to show it to councilors. Its a f*cking scandal :mad:
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby Frank Taylor » Sat Mar 03, 2007 4:49 pm

very funny
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby PVC King » Sun Mar 04, 2007 3:17 am

No doubt a reflection of pester power in relation to the metropole application.

Not an appropriate location as indicated by the precedent for sinking similar conveniences in past times.

I find the idea of public conveniences a strange concept at such locations in 2007. Surely there are sufficient facilities in shopping centres and transport nodes presuming that people are too timid to walk into a pub or cafe.

This entire proposal should be shelved pending proper analysis.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby Alek Smart » Sun Mar 04, 2007 4:07 am

Sometimes I find myself pondering upon the relative merits or demerits of a benevolent dictatorship to replace the somewhat threadbare "Democratic Process" which we are continually told to be grateful for.

Just a few weeks ago we had Martin Cullen,a Minister of this Parish,effectively running a skewer through the prospects of a Dublin Transportation Authority.
This towering collusus of Political Willpower told us that the first recommendation of the DTA Planning Group was being repudiated by the Government as it might be percieved by the Great Unwashed as "Undermining the Integrity of the Democratic Process".

That recommendation....??? Oh nothing more than the DTA seeking to establish a TRUE oversight role in terms of urban planning and transport...

Well I would suggest that Minister Cullen and the other members of this "Government" which he refers to,might well ask Mr MacNamara and his fellow "Proffessionals" around to Kildare St for Tea and Muffins followed by a detailed outline of the Governmental position on the "Integrity of the Democratic Process"

I would suspect an hour or so`s full and frank exchange of views should awaken Mr Mac and other Council Proffessionals to the dangers of being regarded for posterity as Philinistines,something which I feel sure they would be aghast at.

Of course it might also be neccessary for a Joint Government/DCC Fact Finding mission to meet with M.JC Decaux,who sounds suspiciously non-national and possibly resides somewhere exotic...or at least warm & dry.

Now lets see.......Martinique....? Mustique.....Put Aer Corps One on standby I`ll just go pack an overnight bag !!!! :) :) :)
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Bertie has objected

Postby hutton » Sun Mar 04, 2007 8:40 pm

Bertie and Tony Gregory are among those who have lodged objections...
From today's Sunday Independent wrote:
. . . and looking after constituents

RONALD QUINLAN

TAOISEACH Bertie Ahern may have a lot on his plate when it comes to the economy, the peace process, and the small matter of a looming general election.

But that doesn't mean he doesn't have the time to help out the people who put him in power in the first place.

Letters obtained by the Sunday Independent show how in 2006 alone, Mr Ahern wrote on nine occasions to the planning department at Dublin City Council to make representations on behalf of his Dublin Central constituents on a range of matters from house extensions, a creche, to an illuminated street sign.

A clear believer in the well-worn adage that 'all politics is local', the ward boss penned missives on behalf of numerous denizens of Drumcondra, Glasnevin and Summerhill to the Assistant City Manager Sean Healy in which he asked to be informed of the 'position' on planning applications.

Adding to the impact of Mr Ahern's 'subtle' intervention in each case is his use of official headed paper from the Department of the Taoiseach.

In one case, he writes twice on behalf of a Glasnevin-based woman in relation to her application for planning permission for a playschool in Drumcondra.

The Taoiseach's second letter on behalf of the would-be Montessori proprietor relays her concern that temporary planning permission would be insufficient for her to secure grants or loans to finance her business start-up.

Another letter to the Assistant City Manager on August 17 sees Mr Ahern - in his official capacity as Taoiseach - write to relay a resident's concern at the prospect of an extension being built on his next door neighbour's house.

In this case, our prime minister asks the second-most senior official in Dublin City to inform him of the 'outcome in this matter'.

Lest it be said, however, that Mr Ahern is being distracted from the affairs of State by trifling matters such as the conversion of an outdoor toilet to a conservatory, another missive to the planning department shows otherwise.

In a shining example of democracy at work, our Taoiseach takes up the cause of the people of Summerhill over the prospect of an illuminated advertising sign being placed on the footpath at Langrishe Place, by advertisers, JC Decaux.

The matter of the advertisement could yet be relevant to Mr Ahern's electoral fortunes in May however - it appears that Dublin Central TD Tony Gregory also wrote to the planners on the matter.


Shows how much the journalist knows, thinking he's making a quip at the taoiseach with the remark "In a shining example of democracy at work":rolleyes:

Anyway its no harm that objections has been lodged from such quarters :)
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Postby hutton » Sun Mar 04, 2007 9:03 pm

Hows this for pure guff - seemingly just copied and pasted from a press release; remarkably similar to Treacy Hogans piece - not that journalists would ever cog off each other, either :rolleyes:

BBC wrote:'Cycling those carbon emissions away'
By Shane Harrison
BBC NI Dublin Correspondent

With growing concern about carbon emissions, Dublin City Council has come up with a novel idea that involves both cycling and recycling.

The council says each bike will have a mini-computer chip

The council plans to have 500 bicycles located at 25 points around the city for public use 24 hours a day.

For a small charge, still to be determined, people can pick up one of the bikes and use it - but they must leave it back at a drop-off point so that someone else can, if you like, "recycle" it.

The council says each bike will have a mini-computer chip to allow it to be tracked.

That means it's unlikely to suffer the same fate as abandoned shopping trolleys, according to Dublin City Council officials.

The bikes, which will be available to the public in about six months' time, are described as "virtually vandal proof".

They cannot get punctures, they will have no visible cables, but they will have a bell, a front light, two back lights, brakes and integrated gears.

'More like Amsterdam'

The bikes are being introduced by the outdoor advertising company, JC Decaux.

In exchange, the company will get planning permission to erect 120 permanent advertising billboards and remove about 1,800 current billboards.

As part of the deal, more than 60% of the new advertising space will be for civic information purposes, telling citizens and tourists what's going on in the Irish capital.

Green councillor, Bronwen Maher, has welcomed the proposal as a good first step in Dublin becoming more like Amsterdam, but she does have reservations about the involvement of an advertising company.

The bikes are described as "virtually vandal proof"

"We have to do something about the chronic traffic problems and congestion in the city centre, but I'm a bit concerned that the council isn't operating the scheme independently and is linking up with an advertiser," she says.

Some councillors have also expressed concerns that the new billboards should not be placed in sensitive, historic sites. But there seems almost unanimous support for the general idea.

As some wits have pointed out, the mock-insult "On yer bike" will take on a whole new meaning in Dublin.

"On yer bike - but don't forget to leave it back."


"More like Amsterdam" - yep you'd want to be smoking an awful lot of what they're having to buy this guff.
And I'd love to know where he got this idea "there seems almost unanimous support for the general idea" :confused: :confused:; Must be an early April Fools :D
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby newgrange » Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:01 am

One of the other Summerhill sites should fail automatically as it is described as 'Summerville' (wherever that is) repeatedly in the planning application.

6767/06 Footpath on southern side of Summerville, Adjacent To 67-84 Mountain View Court (under reconstruction), Summerville, Dublin 1
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby Alek Smart » Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:01 pm

I have now discovered yet another reason for Minister Cullen and his Governments concerns at the dilution of the "Democratic Process"......It is presently the topic of some open-air theatrical drama over in Dartmouth Square where the "Old Style" of Irish Entreprenur is packing them in to his new Tile Showroom....apparently some enterprising Archiseekers are seeking a bulk discount !!!! :)
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Postby hutton » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:09 pm

Looks as if the Beeb's correspondant could have done with checking his own archive. Internal memo from JCDecaux - ensure that woolen eye-covers are tailor made and easy to wear.

BBC wrote:Branded dangerous and said to be defacing the countryside - why illegal roadside advertising is making people see red.
Wednesday, 26 July 2006,

They are "spreading like a rash" across the country and the firms selling them are "eyesore merchants" who are "defacing the countryside", say their critics.

The items causing such uproar? Unauthorised advertisements in fields along motorways and major roads.

At one hotspot - the M6 in Staffordshire - a motorist can see, on average, a hoarding every 30 seconds, according to a survey jointly carried out by the Campaign for the Protection of Rural England (CPRE), the Countryside Agency and Highways Agency.

It is a lucrative business, with the advertisements costing about £1,000 a month and the companies who sell them claim they are seen by anything from 60,000 to 175,000 drivers a day.

'Tatty trailers'

For years planning controls have saved the rural landscape from advertising but marketing firms and websites have sprung up, offering such displays to advertisers and money to farmers willing to install them on their land.

The government is now planning a crackdown. Housing and planning minister Yvette Cooper wants to build a database of persistent offenders to help local authorities mount prosecutions.


HOARDING HOTSPOTS
M1 in Yorkshire
M5 in Worcestershire and Somerset
M6 in Cheshire and Staffordshire
M40 between Oxford and Birmingham
M62 in Lancashire and Yorkshire
SOURCE: CPRE

Many of the hoardings are mounted on trailers, to exploit a common misconception that formal permission is not needed for advertisements on wheels. In fact, advertisement regulations clearly state that such an exemption does not apply if the trailer has been stationary for some time or if it is used for the display of an advertisement.

Companies need to apply for authorisation from the local council under the advertising regulations - and it should almost always refuse permission. The government has sent a letter to all local planning authorities reminding them that land alongside motorways should be kept free of advertisements that either blot the landscape or are a possible danger to drivers.

"For too long cowboy firms have been able to get away with cheapening our countryside with tatty trailers touting things like used cars and printer cartridges," says Paul Miner, planning campaigner for the CPRE.

"For more than 50 years, planning controls have saved the English landscape from the pox of outdoor advertising. This achievement is now in danger. Billboards and hoardings are mushrooming alongside motorways and major roads across England, despite government policy and regulations clearly stating they should be strictly controlled."

Displaying an advertisement without consent can result in a maximum fine of £2,500 plus £250 a day on conviction for a continuing offence. The advertiser, the company that sells the ads and the landowner are all potentially liable to prosecution.

Eye-catching

Most trailers do not have consent, says the Outdoor Advertising Council (OAC). It "deplores" the signs, has nothing to do with the firms that sell them and says they bring advertising into disrepute.

"These companies try and hide themselves," says spokesman, Chris Thomas. "They usually only use mobile phone numbers and are hard to track down. They do nothing but harm reputable outside advertising companies."

Campaigners say the hoardings are also dangerous, as they are designed to be read and to distract. Combined with the high speeds normal on main roads and motorways, they have the potential to cause serious accidents, says the CPRE.


This is an industry that causes the countryside or green belt no harm. It is an activity just as commercial as farming or property speculation

M6 Media

A major study into the issue gets under way next week. Up until now most studies have concentrated on distractions in a car, such as mobile phones and satellite navigation.

"This is a massive issue at the moment," says Dr Mark Young, an expert in transport safety at Brunel University and the academic leading the research.

"We already know that things like signs increase the mental workload of drivers and are a distraction. Previous research has shown that 78% of accidents are due to distraction, we will hopefully now find out how much of that is due to distractions inside and outside the car."

But companies who sell the adverts say they are being unfairly targeted and provide a valuable source of income to cash-strapped farmers.

Farmers diversify

One company, M6 Media, says it is no longer in business. "It is unfortunate the way things have developed as this is an industry that causes the countryside or green belt no harm. It is an activity just as commercial as farming or property speculation," it said in a statement.

Another firm, which did not want to be named, says some farmers have told them items such as the hoardings and telephone masts "are the best crop the farm now has". It has also stopped providing the hoardings, saying the government tells farmers to diversify and then clamps down on anyone who shows entrepreneurial skills.

Drivers already have many distractions
The company refused to disclose what cut farmers got of the money made from the hoardings.

The National Farmers' Union says the advertisements are a way of earning additional cash, but the proportion of farmers who allow them is very small.

"Very few farms border motorways and of those that do an even smaller amount actually allow the hoardings. It is not really a big money earner for the industry."

The CPRE says it recognises many farmers are facing economic hardship but blighting the countryside with advertising hoardings is not the way forward.

The pressure group has "named and shamed" companies who have advertised this way, resulting in some pledging not to do so again, including Tesco.

"It was never our policy to advertise in this way," says a spokeswoman for the supermarket. "There were a handful of local store initiatives in which this type of advertising may have been used, but this was stopped."

But with an estimated 900 such hoardings along the country's motorways, there is still some way to go.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby hutton » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:37 pm

The cat is out of the bag - In a new study by Dr. Mark Young of Brunel University, carried out in simulated conditions where performances were measured, it finds that there was a "larger number of crashes in the conditions with adverts than thosed without". An informative interview regarding this has just been on Newstalk.

So the facts are now self-evident; if DCC proceeds as is, the billboards wont just lead to a loss of visual amenity, devalue property, or be bad for business - but the real cost of the "free bicycles" will be the blood of vunerable road users - such as cyclists.

FFS Stop this madness now. :mad:



UK News wrote:
UK News

Crash risk of drivers 'distracted' by posters

Monday, 21st November 2005, 08:30

One-in-five male drivers are so distracted by scantily-clad models - like Kate Moss or Sophie Dahl - on roadside hoardings that they are likely to crash, new research published today claims.

However just one-in-10 women drivers will confess to being captivated by semi-naked male models in adverts.

One-in-four drivers in the UK have become so distracted by roadside objects that they have veered out of their lane, according to the study for Privilege Insurance.

A third (32 per cent) of drivers said billboards, flashing signs or Christmas decorations had caused them to lose concentration, and 41 per cent confessed to being distracted for more than five seconds - equal to driving 15 car lengths at 30mph.

Dr Mark Young, an expert in transport ergonomics at Brunel University, said: "While we currently know a lot more about in-vehicle distractions such as mobile phones than external distracters, there is a growing body of concern about the lack of any coherent strategy for arranging roadside furniture.

"Drivers' visual workload varies through the course of a journey, and at crucial times - negotiating a difficult roundabout, for example, there is a small but significant risk of distraction from novel stimuli like advertising."

And a second survey, carried out by Direct Line, claims one-in-three drivers suffer from the newly recognised disorder "Traffic Stress Syndrome" or TSS.

The research, also published today, reveals traffic jams are bad for the mood of drivers, and can result in TSS, a form of psychological anxiety which manifests itself in certain drivers when they are stuck in traffic.

Copyright © 2006 National News +44(0)207 684 3000

From: http://www.lse.co.uk/ShowStory.asp?story=NL2019885F&news_headline=crash_risk_of_drivers_distracted_by_posters
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby Devin » Mon Mar 05, 2007 11:33 pm

Speaking of distractions, is this campaign coming to Dublin? :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zu5sH_jNCBw
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby ctesiphon » Tue Mar 06, 2007 1:21 am

Ha! I was wondering if/when that'd show up here. Fortunately, PP isn't required for pretty ladies. ;)

I should add to your post- that video is probably NSFW.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby publicrealm » Tue Mar 06, 2007 1:29 am

[quote="ctesiphon"]Ha! I was wondering if/when that'd show up here. Fortunately, PP isn't required for pretty ladies. ]


I don't think it would work here - the poor girl would be slagged to death and I dread to think what the wags would say about the poor policeman's name.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby ctesiphon » Tue Mar 06, 2007 1:46 am

The threat of slagging doesn't seem to stop many young ladies and gents going out on the town in mid-winter dressed as if for Ibiza. But let's face it, if lorry drivers at Clare Hall and ambulance drivers in many parts of south and west Dublin* can't do their jobs in peace, what hope for a topless foxy blonde?

(By 'here', I meant on this site. Should have clarified. :o )

*Before anyone gets all shirty over the specified location, I've only ever heard of ambulance drivers being attacked on duty in these locations.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby manifesta » Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:29 pm

Hoardings along the roadside, apart from being dangerous to motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians (as if we could ever hope that reasoned argument will prevail on this front), are quite possibly the most asinine form of advertising known to mankind.

It was a novelty in America during the Great Depression when Burma Shave set up roadsigns along a rural highway in Minnesota. These billboards, usually five or six to a crop, spelled out jingles that took the average driver about 18 seconds to read and usually had some amusing pun or rhyme. This eventually spread throughout most of the 50 states and generally cheered people up from the fact that they had no job, no means of supporting their families, and were lucky to be scrapping round in a vehicle that doubled as a home. Surely not the preferred method for grabbing peoples' attention in this time of the Celtic Tiger!

They started to dig these things up in the 50's when someone decided it wasn't worth it to pay farmers for land rental. Cigaratte giants Phillip Morris bought out Burma Shave in 1963 and sensibly set about a more lucrative form of advertising that spoke to the changing times: subliminal advertising and lacing their products with fiberglass and cocaine, I mean, nicotine. Come on, JC Decaux and M6 Media. No one wants to see more of this crap by the side of the road. This is the 21st century. Can't you control people's thoughts through mobile phones by now?

Something for nostalgia's sake-- to be inserted inside the new hoardings we'll soon be seeing by the roadside:

IF YOU WANT

FREE JACKS AND BIKES

YOU"LL HAVE TO PUT UP

WITH OUR SHITE

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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby ctesiphon » Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:50 pm

For anyone considering submitting an observation / objection to phase 2 (50 No. smaller signs) of this proposal, today is the last day. So get busy, people! :)
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby hutton » Mon Mar 12, 2007 8:49 pm

Heres something that may be of interest; the first map is that of the locations of the larger billboards as marked by red dots - isnt it odd how the map shows so much of the northside :rolleyes: -

Image

This second map is that of the bus-shelter size adverts, this time marked by orange dots -

Image
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby alonso » Mon Mar 12, 2007 10:09 pm

besides the Grand Canal area, are there any billboards planned for D2?
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby ConK » Tue Mar 13, 2007 11:00 am

Great Work Hutton !

You haven't marked out where the Bike centres are proposed to be. I was thinking about this, and although I don't think that the price of the bike is the inhibiting factor for people to cycle - it might just get a few more people cyling - which is a good thing albeit at a high price.

I think that the maintainance break/fix contract to support the bikes should have a 40 year duration - like the toll roads. And if the quantity of bikes decreases by (say) 20, JC Dev remove one of the billboards.

I guess what I'm saying is that the fate of the billboards should be inextricably tied to the fate of the bikes. So when the bikes end up the in canal & JC Dev have no incentive to take them out, they loose a billboard.

Why don't Dublin City Council put up the billboards, and keep the advertising revenue themsleves - to spend on the bikes? and spend JcDevs profits putting in a few cycle lanes.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby PVC King » Wed Mar 14, 2007 10:57 am

The bikes shelters and ancillary bikes could still be profitable for JC Deceaux in their own right it is felt. These will no doubt all be located on main routes and will have three road facing sides which will no doubt be festooned with images of Wayne Rooney et al which could potentially generate as much as €20,000 per installation per year depending on location. Taking a 5% yield and assuming that the rental fees and maintenance costs of these unpuncturable bikes are cost neutral the value of each such installation could be €400,000.

This is not de nortside being lumbered with metropoles whilst the southside gets the prize paid for by de nortside's metropoles.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby publicrealm » Wed Mar 14, 2007 11:03 am

PVC King wrote:These will no doubt all be located on main routes and will have three road facing sides which will no doubt be festooned with images of Wayne Rooney et al which will each generate as much as €20,000 per installation per year depending on location.

This is not de nortside being lumbered with metropoles whilst the southside gets the prize to pay for it.


I understand that Mr Rooney is admired on the Northside - but surely his image will not be used on the Southside? Are we to have Sinn Fein election posters next?

Appalled.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby PVC King » Wed Mar 14, 2007 11:06 am

No I think the Southside will get John Terry as many seem to confuse Donnybrook with Chelsea if the number of urban tractors is anything to go by. I as always dream of Shamrock Rovers becoming great again.
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Re: You thought Dublin's streets were cluttered already?

Postby hutton » Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:26 pm

ConK wrote:Great Work Hutton !


Many thanks :)

Anybody hear this on the Vincent Brown show the other night - or is that just a rumour? I see theres a big piece in Phoenix magazine on it (page 5, under the heading "councilors taken for a ride"); if anyone has a digital copy of that, it'd be great to post here ;)
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