reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches

Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Dec 11, 2011 5:50 pm

Cardbord Cathedral - Christchurch, New Zealand

http://www.shigerubanarchitects.com/SBA ... ts_26.html

SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS
坂 茂 建 築 設 計

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1957 Born in Tokyo 東京生まれ
1977-80 Southern California Institute of Architecture 南カリフォルニア建築大学(SCI-ARC)在学(ロサンゼルス)
1980-82 Cooper Union School of Architecture クーパー・ユニオン建築学部在学(ニューヨーク)
1982-83 Worked for Arata Isozaki, Tokyo, Japan 磯崎新アトリエ勤務
1984 Bachelor of Architecture, Cooper Union School of Architecture クーパー・ユニオン卒業、Bachelor of Architecture取得
1985 Established private practice in Tokyo, Japan 坂茂建築設計設立
1993-95 Adjunct Professor of Architecture, Tama Art University 多摩美術大学建築学科非常勤講師
1995-99 Consultant of United Nations High Commissioner for Refgees (UNHCR) 国連難民高等弁務官事務所(UNHCR)コンサルタン
1995 Established VAN (Voluntary Architects Network) VAN(ボランタリー建築家機構) を設立
1995-99 Adjunct Professor of Architecture, Yokohama National University 横浜国立大学建築科非常勤講師
1996-2000 Adjunct Professor of Architecture, Nihon University 日本大学理工学部建築科非常勤講師
2000 Visiting Professor, Columbia University コロンビア大学建築学科客員教授
2000 Visiting Fellow, Donald Keen Center, Columbia University コロンビア大学ドナルド・キーン研究所特別研究員
2001-2008 Professor, Keio University 慶応義塾大学環境情報学部教授
2005 Amherst College Doctor of Human Letters アメースト・カレッジ 名誉博士号-人道的活動
2006-2009 Jury of Pritzker Architecture Prize プリツカー賞審査員
2009 National Order of the Legion of Honor in France ロルドル・ナショナル・ド・ラ・レジオン・ドヌール勲章(フランス)
2009 Honorary Doctorate of Technical University of Munich ミュンヘン工科大学 名誉博士号
2009 Grand Prize of AIJ 2009 日本建築学会賞-作品部門
2010 Visiting Professor, Havard University Graduate School of Design ハーバード大学GSD客員教授
2010 Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France フランス芸術文化勲章
2010 Visiting Professor,Cornell University コーネル大学 客員教授
2011 Auguste Perret Prize オーギュスト・ペレ賞
2011- Professor, Kyoto University of Art and Design 京都造形芸術大学芸術学部環境デザイン学科教授
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:09 pm

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:09 am

The Dura-Europos Synagogue: Jewish Sacred Art


The Dura-Europas synagogue is one of the oldest surviving synagogues. Located in Syria, it is dated to A.D. 244. It was discovered in the 1930's during excavations of the Dura Europoa site.

http://divdl.library.yale.edu/dl/Browse ... kon&qs=464


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Image

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby apelles » Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:50 am

St. Mary's on Haddington Road has just been rededicated after being closed for six months & a cool 2 mil worth of refurbishments.
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/1212/1224308953822.html

Not exactly the most informative of articles really.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Paul Clerkin » Mon Dec 19, 2011 2:19 pm

From The Irish Times


Sir, – Between 1957 and 1969 a series of exhibitions on sacred art and architecture took place in Dublin, two of these – the 1962 Exhibition of Sacred Art and the 1969 Art in Worship Today exhibitions – focused on Irish artists and architects working in this area.

I would like to hear (either by e-mail eimirobrien@hotmail.com or by post to the address below) from anyone who either visited or was involved in any of these exhibitions. My interest relates to a PhD research project in this area. – Yours, etc,

EIMIR O’BRIEN,

Visual Culture Department,

National College of Art and Design,

100 Thomas Street,

Dublin 8
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:38 pm

A happy Christmas to all and a prosperous New Year.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby PVC King » Sat Dec 24, 2011 10:33 am

Happy Christmas Praxiteles, I hope you have a rewarding year in all senses.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby apelles » Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:56 am

Seasons greetings Prax, Heres an interesting article for you that enquires "just which Dublin church did AWN Pugin help design for JJ McCarthy"?
Note also how William MacBride from the Dublin Craftworkers gets a mention.

Saint Catherine’s: the poor man’s Cheadle?

Image

Saint Catherine of Alexandria, Meath Street ... was this the work of McCarthy or of Pugin? (Photograph: Patrick Comerford (2010)

http://revpatrickcomerford.blogspot.com/2010/10/saint-catherines-poor-mans-cheadle.html

A few weeks ago, I visited Saint Saviour’s Church, the Dominican church in Lower Dominick Street, Dublin, which Jeanne Sheehy describes as “the most important” of JJ McCarthy’s “city churches.”

Saint Saviour’s is built in the 14th century Decorated Gothic style. The foundation stone was laid on 8 September 1852, and the church was consecrated on 15 January 1861. The façade bears many similarities to the west front of Basilica of Saint Clotilde on the Rue Las Cases in Ste Germain-des-Prés in Paris, without its twin spires. Inside, the fine interior of Saint Saviour’s, with its high arches and delicate tracery and carving, make it one of the most beautiful churches in Dublin; the north aisle and south aisle are later additions.

This was the finest of McCarthy’s Dublin churches, but for the rest of his life McCarthy had to defend himself against accusations that Saint Saviour’s had, in fact, been designed by the great architect of the Gothic Revival, AWN Pugin. In a letter published in the Dublin Builder on 1 February 1863, ‘An Architect’ queried whether McCarthy had designed Saint Saviour’s and implied that it was the work of Pugin.

For the rest of his life, McCarthy defended himself against allegations that he was not the true architect of Saint Saviour’s and that it was, in fact, the work of Pugin. But to be fair to both Pugin and McCarthy, it is clear that Pugin did not design Saint Saviour’s – instead, many of its details are reproduced from Saint Clotilde’s. But McCarthy’s denials and those comparisons do not resolve questions about which church Pugin designed for McCarthy early in 1852.

If Saint Saviour’s is not Pugin’s, I wondered whether there was another church in Dublin that had been designed by Pugin but which McCarthy managed to pass off as his own.

At the time, McCarthy had received three commissions in quick succession for landmark churches in Dublin: Our Lady Star of the Sea, Sandymount (1851), and Saint Catherine of Alexandria, Meath Street, and Saint Saviour’s, Lower Dominick Street (both 1851). These three churches were designed in quick succession in a period of sixteen months, so naturally there were questions whether McCarthy was the sole author and creator of each work.

McCarthy was in correspondence with Pugin early in 1852, seeking advice on his own projects and offering to undertake the management of some of Pugin’s commissions in return for half the fee and all the travelling expenses. The collaboration between the two architects was difficult and finally was cut short by Pugin’s death on 14 September 1852. But was that collaboration in the months immediately prior to Pugin’s death limited to the FitzPatrick chantry in Clough, or did it extend to McCarthy’s more public and prestigious ecclesiastical undertakings in Dublin?

Image

The interior of Saint Catherine’s in Meath Street ... similar in many ways to Pugin’s ‘perfect’ Cheadlle (Photograph: Patrick Comerford, 2010)

In mid-January 1852, McCarthy wrote to Pugin asking for drawings for a church in Dublin. Rosemary Hill points out in her biography of Pugin, God’s Architect, that this was the sort of arrangement Pugin would not have tolerated a few months earlier, even a few weeks earlier. But a letter in the collection of Phoebe Stanton shows that Pugin wrote back to McCarthy on 15 January, agreeing to undertake “finishing all the drawings details & anything required your superintending.”

And so the question must be asked; which church in Dublin did Pugin design for McCarthy? And did McCarthy claim it as his own – just as Charles Barry in the same year would claim Pugin’s work in the Palace of Westminster as his own?

Pugin’s letter, dated 15 January 1852, advises MCarthy: “Let everyone see and hear by the chancels … down the nave. Keep the churches bright with good windows … you will see that if you honour the chancel we will make your church a chancel.” By the time Pugin wrote this letter, McCarthy’s church in Sandymount was already being built, while work on Saint Saviour’s would not begin for another eight months. It is difficult to imagine that by mid-January 1852, McCarthy was not anticipating the commission he was about to receive for Saint Catherine’s in Meath Street.

So last week I headed off with a student to take a closer look at and to measure Saint Catherine’s in Meath Street. In every respect, this looks like Pugin’s ideal English country parish church. It is built in the Decorated Gothic style, with some Perpendicular features.

Image

The Power memorial window in Saint Catherine’s (Photograph: Patrick Comerford, 2010)

I’m interested to find out that McCarthy’s commission came through the goodwill of those closest to Pugin’s own patrons in Staffordshire and Co Wexford, the Talbot and Power families, and that craftsmen who worked on it had all been engaged in Pugin’s own works in Ireland.

Saint Catherine’s replaced an earlier, octagonal shaped Georgian chapel that stood on the site. Canon John Laphen’s proposals for the new church were approved by his parishioners at a meeting called in February 1852 and chaired by Sir James Power (1800-1877) of Edermine, Co Wexford.

Power, who was the proprietor of Power’s Distillery, was closely connected with Pugin’s patrons in Staffordshire and Wexford: in 1843, he had married Jane Eliza Talbot, a daughter of John Hyacinth Talbot and a first cousin of Maria Theresa Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury; then, in 1851, at the age of 58, and almost 30 years after the death of his first wife, Anna Eliza Redmond, John Hyacinth Talbot married Power’s sister, Eliza. Perhaps through Power’s persuasive powers, Laphen’s plans were accepted immediately, and McCarthy began work without delay: the foundation stone was laid on 30 June 1852 by Archbishop Cullen.

McCarthy’s plans included a nave with open timbered roof, side aisles and chapel at an estimated cost of up to £9,000. The church was complete by March 1857 – apart from the upper portion of the tower and spire – and was dedicated on 30 June 1858. McCarthy’s intended tower was never completed, and the stub was finished off later with a machiolated parapet. The side elevations include perforated buttresses and trefoil aisle windows above the stone-roofed aisles.

The interior of Saint Catherine’s is plain. The impressive great East Window (1862) by Frederick Settle Barff (1823-1886), a former Anglican priest who had converted to Catholicism in 1852. The window floods the sanctuary with light, and it is matched by an equally impressive West Window with perpendicular panelled tracery … just as Pugin advised McCarthy when it came to designing churches.

Image

‘The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine of Alexandria,’ by William MacBride of Dublin, in a similar position as the ‘Doom Painting’ in Saint Giles in Cheadle (Photograph: Patrick Comerford, 2010)

The painting in the architrave, separating the chancel from the nave, depicts ‘The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine of Alexandria,’ and is by William MacBride of Dublin. But is in a similar position as the ‘Doom Painting’ in Pugin’s ‘perfect’ Saint Giles in Cheadle, near Alton Towers, the Earl of Shrewsbury’s home in mid-Staffordshire.

Indeed, Saint Catherine’s is, for all the world, like a poor man’s Cheadle, which Pugin regarded as his ‘perfect’ work.

Pugin died on 14 September 1852, only weeks after the foundation stones had been laid for Saint Catherine’s and Saint Saviour’s. McCarthy quickly assumed the supervision of completing Pugin’s two Irish cathedrals, Saint Mary’s, Killarney, and Saint Aidan’s, Enniscorthy, and of Richard Pierce’s ‘Twin Churches’ in Wexford.

If any Dublin church was designed by Pugin, then it must have been Saint Catherine’s. Could McCarthy have managed to hide this by allowing himself to defend only the allegations made about Saint Saviour’s?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby gunter » Fri Dec 30, 2011 11:57 pm

While we're waiting for Prax to pronounce on this, can I just point out that, superficially at least, St. Catherine's, Meath St. looks nothing like St. Giles, Cheadle, while on the other hand it does look quite a lot like Star-of-the-Sea, Sandymount [internally] and St Saviour's, Dominick St. [externally].

I can't find any internal views of Star-of-the-Sea, but I've spent enough long hours in it in my time, with the mind wandering, to recall that the roof structure had those legs extending down the walls to granite corbels, the same as we're seeing in the Meath St. picture. Star-of-the-Sea doesn't have any of the refined urban sophistocation of St. Saviour's, but it combines some rustic economy with a very satisfying control of composition and is evidence enough that J.J. McCarty didn't need Pugin's help to design churches.

Image
a sketch of Star of the Sea, Sandymount

Meath Street would probably rank higher in the pantheon of Dublin Churches had the spire been finished and it's probably that graceless stump that dragged down its architectural merit and meant that no one bothered to challenge its authorship when it was fashionable to assign every pointed arch in the city to Pugin.

Yer man Comerford has posed an interesting question, but I'm not sure I see the need to find another author for Meath St. when it seems to fit rather comfortably into J.J. McCarthy's portfolio, and especially since Pugin had died so soon after the project arose.

We'll await the official word from Prax.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Jan 02, 2012 9:32 pm

Monday, January 02, 2012Fire at historic church in Dublin city centre

Monday, January 02, 2012Fire at historic church in Dublin city centre

GARDAÍ ARE INVESTIGATING after a substantial fire was brought under control at a historic church in Dublin city centre this afternoon.


A man in his 50s was arrested after emergency services were called to the blaze at St Catherine’s Church on Meath Street in the Liberties area at around 4.45pm.


He is currently in custody at Kevin Street garda station.


Four water tenders and an aerial ladder were deployed by Dublin Fire Brigade to bring the fire under control.


A number of garda units also attended the scene.


Emergency services are not currently aware of any injuries.


Meath Street has been closed between Thomas Street and Dean Street while the scene is being examined.


According to archaeological reports, the current building dates from the mid-19th century but a church has stood on the site since the 18th century.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Jan 02, 2012 9:49 pm

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby castlehamilton » Tue Jan 03, 2012 8:32 pm

An interesting thesis proposed by Rev Comerford though I would have thought it remains most likely that the Church in question was indeed St Saviours. It appears that Rev Comerford's theory is based mainly upon the footprints of Irishtown and St Catherine's resembling that of St Giles.

It is clear that during the 1850's and 1860's McCarthy was highly influenced by St Giles (no doubt as a result of Pugin's shameless self promotion!) and viewed it as an archetype. He clearly used it as a model for Holy Trinity in Cookstown, Co Tyrone (one of his lesser known works begun in 1855) which not only precisely fits the ground plan but also looks exceptionally similar from the exterior with soaring West tower and spire with flanking aisles, side altars terminating the aisles and a sacristy necessitating the moving forward of the North side Chapel. Jeanne Sheehy also conjectures that McCarthy was in some way responsible for St Anne's Liverpool which again follows not only the Cheadle ground plan but also its external appearance (though the spire was never built). Sheehy also recognises the very significant similarities between Cheadle the Carmelite Church at Moate, the exterior elevation of which matches Cheadle even more than Holy Trinity. I would thus have thought if the only evidence for Pugin's input to St Catherine's is the ground plan, this is perhaps not as stongly indicative as Rev Comerford would have us believe. It would have thought it far more likely that the uncharacteristic splendour and coherence of St Saviour's bears the hallmark of the Master rather than the comparatively conventional and unsurprising St Catherine's. Certainly the exhortations contained in Pugin's letter of 1852 seem to have been given fuller realisation in St Saviour's than St Catherine's. Furthermore, this use of an archetype can easily explain how McCarthy was able to complete works on three churches in 16 months: at least two were pattern-book.

I can't help but feel that the old phrase about smoke and fire may be true here: given the amount of speculation there was at the time about Pugin's authorship of St Saviour's it seems likely that if he did indeed design a church now accredited to McCarthy (which to some extent I find unlikely as certainly during his lifetime he would never have allowed this to happen), it was St Saviour's. St Catherine's on Meath Street is simply too cut-and-paste and much too typical of McCarthy's earlier work to be by Pugin.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:13 pm

St. Michael's, Blackrock, Co. Cork

Praxiteles has been sent the following pictures of old St Michael's, Blackrock, Co. Cork, designed by Br. Michael Augustine O'Riordan and burned on 31 January 1962:

Image


[
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:14 pm

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:20 pm

St. Michael's, Blackrock, Co. Cork

Image
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:32 pm

apelles wrote:Seasons greetings Prax, Heres an interesting article for you that enquires "just which Dublin church did AWN Pugin help design for JJ McCarthy"?
Note also how William MacBride from the Dublin Craftworkers gets a mention.

Saint Catherine’s: the poor man’s Cheadle?

Image

Saint Catherine of Alexandria, Meath Street ... was this the work of McCarthy or of Pugin? (Photograph: Patrick Comerford (2010)

http://revpatrickcomerford.blogspot.com/2010/10/saint-catherines-poor-mans-cheadle.html

A few weeks ago, I visited Saint Saviour’s Church, the Dominican church in Lower Dominick Street, Dublin, which Jeanne Sheehy describes as “the most important” of JJ McCarthy’s “city churches.”

Saint Saviour’s is built in the 14th century Decorated Gothic style. The foundation stone was laid on 8 September 1852, and the church was consecrated on 15 January 1861. The façade bears many similarities to the west front of Basilica of Saint Clotilde on the Rue Las Cases in Ste Germain-des-Prés in Paris, without its twin spires. Inside, the fine interior of Saint Saviour’s, with its high arches and delicate tracery and carving, make it one of the most beautiful churches in Dublin; the north aisle and south aisle are later additions.

This was the finest of McCarthy’s Dublin churches, but for the rest of his life McCarthy had to defend himself against accusations that Saint Saviour’s had, in fact, been designed by the great architect of the Gothic Revival, AWN Pugin. In a letter published in the Dublin Builder on 1 February 1863, ‘An Architect’ queried whether McCarthy had designed Saint Saviour’s and implied that it was the work of Pugin.

For the rest of his life, McCarthy defended himself against allegations that he was not the true architect of Saint Saviour’s and that it was, in fact, the work of Pugin. But to be fair to both Pugin and McCarthy, it is clear that Pugin did not design Saint Saviour’s – instead, many of its details are reproduced from Saint Clotilde’s. But McCarthy’s denials and those comparisons do not resolve questions about which church Pugin designed for McCarthy early in 1852.

If Saint Saviour’s is not Pugin’s, I wondered whether there was another church in Dublin that had been designed by Pugin but which McCarthy managed to pass off as his own.

At the time, McCarthy had received three commissions in quick succession for landmark churches in Dublin: Our Lady Star of the Sea, Sandymount (1851), and Saint Catherine of Alexandria, Meath Street, and Saint Saviour’s, Lower Dominick Street (both 1851). These three churches were designed in quick succession in a period of sixteen months, so naturally there were questions whether McCarthy was the sole author and creator of each work.

McCarthy was in correspondence with Pugin early in 1852, seeking advice on his own projects and offering to undertake the management of some of Pugin’s commissions in return for half the fee and all the travelling expenses. The collaboration between the two architects was difficult and finally was cut short by Pugin’s death on 14 September 1852. But was that collaboration in the months immediately prior to Pugin’s death limited to the FitzPatrick chantry in Clough, or did it extend to McCarthy’s more public and prestigious ecclesiastical undertakings in Dublin?

Image

The interior of Saint Catherine’s in Meath Street ... similar in many ways to Pugin’s ‘perfect’ Cheadlle (Photograph: Patrick Comerford, 2010)

In mid-January 1852, McCarthy wrote to Pugin asking for drawings for a church in Dublin. Rosemary Hill points out in her biography of Pugin, God’s Architect, that this was the sort of arrangement Pugin would not have tolerated a few months earlier, even a few weeks earlier. But a letter in the collection of Phoebe Stanton shows that Pugin wrote back to McCarthy on 15 January, agreeing to undertake “finishing all the drawings details & anything required your superintending.”

And so the question must be asked; which church in Dublin did Pugin design for McCarthy? And did McCarthy claim it as his own – just as Charles Barry in the same year would claim Pugin’s work in the Palace of Westminster as his own?

Pugin’s letter, dated 15 January 1852, advises MCarthy: “Let everyone see and hear by the chancels … down the nave. Keep the churches bright with good windows … you will see that if you honour the chancel we will make your church a chancel.” By the time Pugin wrote this letter, McCarthy’s church in Sandymount was already being built, while work on Saint Saviour’s would not begin for another eight months. It is difficult to imagine that by mid-January 1852, McCarthy was not anticipating the commission he was about to receive for Saint Catherine’s in Meath Street.

So last week I headed off with a student to take a closer look at and to measure Saint Catherine’s in Meath Street. In every respect, this looks like Pugin’s ideal English country parish church. It is built in the Decorated Gothic style, with some Perpendicular features.

Image

The Power memorial window in Saint Catherine’s (Photograph: Patrick Comerford, 2010)

I’m interested to find out that McCarthy’s commission came through the goodwill of those closest to Pugin’s own patrons in Staffordshire and Co Wexford, the Talbot and Power families, and that craftsmen who worked on it had all been engaged in Pugin’s own works in Ireland.

Saint Catherine’s replaced an earlier, octagonal shaped Georgian chapel that stood on the site. Canon John Laphen’s proposals for the new church were approved by his parishioners at a meeting called in February 1852 and chaired by Sir James Power (1800-1877) of Edermine, Co Wexford.

Power, who was the proprietor of Power’s Distillery, was closely connected with Pugin’s patrons in Staffordshire and Wexford: in 1843, he had married Jane Eliza Talbot, a daughter of John Hyacinth Talbot and a first cousin of Maria Theresa Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury; then, in 1851, at the age of 58, and almost 30 years after the death of his first wife, Anna Eliza Redmond, John Hyacinth Talbot married Power’s sister, Eliza. Perhaps through Power’s persuasive powers, Laphen’s plans were accepted immediately, and McCarthy began work without delay: the foundation stone was laid on 30 June 1852 by Archbishop Cullen.

McCarthy’s plans included a nave with open timbered roof, side aisles and chapel at an estimated cost of up to £9,000. The church was complete by March 1857 – apart from the upper portion of the tower and spire – and was dedicated on 30 June 1858. McCarthy’s intended tower was never completed, and the stub was finished off later with a machiolated parapet. The side elevations include perforated buttresses and trefoil aisle windows above the stone-roofed aisles.

The interior of Saint Catherine’s is plain. The impressive great East Window (1862) by Frederick Settle Barff (1823-1886), a former Anglican priest who had converted to Catholicism in 1852. The window floods the sanctuary with light, and it is matched by an equally impressive West Window with perpendicular panelled tracery … just as Pugin advised McCarthy when it came to designing churches.

Image

‘The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine of Alexandria,’ by William MacBride of Dublin, in a similar position as the ‘Doom Painting’ in Saint Giles in Cheadle (Photograph: Patrick Comerford, 2010)

The painting in the architrave, separating the chancel from the nave, depicts ‘The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine of Alexandria,’ and is by William MacBride of Dublin. But is in a similar position as the ‘Doom Painting’ in Pugin’s ‘perfect’ Saint Giles in Cheadle, near Alton Towers, the Earl of Shrewsbury’s home in mid-Staffordshire.

Indeed, Saint Catherine’s is, for all the world, like a poor man’s Cheadle, which Pugin regarded as his ‘perfect’ work.

Pugin died on 14 September 1852, only weeks after the foundation stones had been laid for Saint Catherine’s and Saint Saviour’s. McCarthy quickly assumed the supervision of completing Pugin’s two Irish cathedrals, Saint Mary’s, Killarney, and Saint Aidan’s, Enniscorthy, and of Richard Pierce’s ‘Twin Churches’ in Wexford.

If any Dublin church was designed by Pugin, then it must have been Saint Catherine’s. Could McCarthy have managed to hide this by allowing himself to defend only the allegations made about Saint Saviour’s?



On the basis of evidence adduced from architectural details toi support this idea, what are we to make of Connolly's work in Canada? Could we say that it was by McCarthy ? Or was Hennessey's work really that of E.W. Pugin?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sat Jan 07, 2012 2:11 pm

St. Catherine's, Meath Street

The parish priest from the historic city centre church which was gutted in a fire this week has said it may be years before it will reopen.


Extensive smoke and water damage were caused by the fire at the 19th Century St Catherine's Church on Meath Street in Dublin's Liberties.


Parish priest Fr Niall Coghlan said the church's organ -- thought to be the oldest in Dublin -- was ruined in the blaze.


The church was in the spotlight in December 2010 when Hollywood actor Martin Sheen attended Mass there on a Saturday evening, happily chatting with locals afterwards.


Patrick Curry (48) of no fixed abode, was charged with arson and remanded in custody for a week. A psychiatric assessment has been ordered at the request of his solicitor.


DAngerous


Fr Coghlan said: "At 4pm on Monday I was told that there was a fire in the church, and by the time I got across the fire had took hold. The fire brigade and the gardai were magnificent. The church is now in a dangerous condition. It's not for viewing by the public, it can't be. It's one of the oldest churches in Dublin, the records date back to the 1600s, so a lot of people in Dublin have connections with the church. The organ was the oldest working one in Dublin and it's been completely incinerated. It was a very old precious organ. The huge stained glass window over the high altar was damaged. The crib went on fire and the vapours from the crib went up and got trapped in the roof, and a fireball went from the back to the front of the church. There's damaged glass all around. People are very upset over their church. It's months or years before it may open again," said Fr Coghlan.


"It has been and is the centre of the community, it's the people's church. It was simple and magnificent inside. We made a decision that we'd open it from 7.30 in the mornings until 5pm, seven days a week. But even when the church is restored, it'll be opened like that again. The loss adjudicators are here, and an architect has been appointed."


He warned that locals should not give money to anyone posing as a fundraiser for the church, since no fundraising has been authorised.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sat Jan 07, 2012 2:15 pm

St. Catherine's, Meath Street


The remains of Barff's chancel window of 1862

Image
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sat Jan 07, 2012 2:20 pm

St. Catherine's, Meath Street


More pictures here:

http://c1.dmlimg.com/2e5c93fc5fcb277c88 ... 9fea37.jpg
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St Mels Cathedral Longford

Postby Fearg » Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:22 pm

A booklet has been produced to summarise the work done so far and give a brief overview of the overall restoration plan. Its a pity it does not contain more information on the plans drawn up so far... and if anyone involved is reading this, its a really bad idea to stick a pipe organ into the corner of a church like St Mels - put it back in a restored west gallery for goodness sake!

http://www.longfordparish.com/ParishReview2011.htm
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:10 pm

De Mortuis Nihil Nisi Bonum

Death of Dr Richard Hurley, Design Architect
for Restoration of St. Mel’s Cathedral
Many people were deeply shocked by the sudden
death on Tuesday, 6th of December of Dr. Richard
Hurley. Among those very deeply and immediately
affected are ourselves, especially those in
very regular contact with him in planning for the
restoration of St. Mel’s Cathedral on which he has
been engaged since he was employed here in 2010.
His death has deprived us of the services which he
was still to give us. Our loss is great. Of course, the
feeling of loss and sadness that we are experiencing
are of a different kind from those of his wife,
Bernardine, and their sons whose distress must be
intense. We deeply sympathise with them.
Richard Hurley was involved with us here many
years ago when the sanctuary of St. Mel’s was
reordered to accommodate the new style of celebration
of the liturgy. While he was no longer involved
when that work on the Cathedral was completed,
his original plan was clearly reflected in
the end product. It had stood the test of time very
well until it was destroyed by the fire of Christmas
Day 2009. Richard entered the scene again last
year when he was an enthusiastic applicant for
the role of architect for the current restoration.
When awarded the key role of Design Architect, he
expressed his delight in being back again. At that
time he promised me with the utmost confidence
that he would achieve the best possible outcome.
As soon as agreement was reached with the other
partner architectural firm involved, Fitzgerald
Kavanagh and Partners, he threw all his energies
into the Association’s mammoth task of agreeing a
programme for the restoration. Since then he has
continued untiringly to press on and meet targets.
He was a man in a hurry and the speed with which
he delivered his plans would have done credit to a
man of half his age.
He delivered his last presentation to the Diocesan
Art and Architecture Committees on the 16th of
November. When he said it was his last, he meant
that this would be the one which would be the
final part of his outline of his vision for the restoration.
He had no idea that it would also be his last
in a more final sense still. As so often happens in
life when we see someone for the last time, as he
concluded the presentation he just checked the
time that he would need to get to the train and
said ‘good-bye’, neither he nor we having any idea
that we would not meet again on earth.
We have now lost our Design Architect but not the
plans he had so carefully prepared for us. He had,
I would like to think, a sense of great satisfaction
in reaching the end of the planning phase. I would
like to think that achieving this stage in this particular
project has somehow rounded off the long
and fruitful career of Ireland’s best and known
and greatly respected Church architect. I would
like to think that this last of the 150 or so major
projects of his life meant more to him than most.
He had given it his full concentration and brought
to it the experience of a lifetime as architect and
the insight of many liturgists, of whom the late
Father Sean Swayne, Director of the Centre for
Pastoral Liturgy in Carlow, was the foremost. I am
very touched by the fact the Diocese of Ardagh and
Clonmacnois has just benefited in the double from
the mature and experienced Richard Hurley, doyen
of Church architects in Ireland. He was Design Architect
for the splendidly restored St Mary’s Church
in Carrick-on-Shannon which was completed last
year and has left us with the plans for St. Mel’s
Cathedral.
Many people in Longford met him when we had
our Open Day on the 18th of September last. He
was at the Cathedral Centre in the morning and
afternoon and spoke with anyone who sought
to speak to him about the model and the draft
plans for the Cathedral on display. He was easily
recognisable with his imposing presence, tall in
stature and impressive in appearance. His gracious
manner and willingness to listen to everyone must
still be remembered, I believe. He stayed for a long
time greeting and talking to people, a tiring exercise
in itself but something to which he attached
great importance.
I have known Richard Hurley for a very long time.
In recent times it was good to have reason to meet
with him very often. He was a truly an inspirational
man, a man of deep faith and integrity. He was
a man who has left a great legacy of fine work in
the design of churches and other buildings of note.
Among his writings is the beautifully illustrated
Irish Church Architecture. We have good reason to
be grateful that part of his legacy will enrich us. It
is my confident hope that when St. Mel’s Cathedral
has been restored his contribution will be seen as
his final gift not just to us but to the nation as well.
+Colm O’Reilly
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:21 pm

The late Richard
Hurley – A Man
with a Simple Vision


The lead architect for the
project to restore St. Mel’s
Cathedral had a simple vision,
“The new St. Mel’s
will say something about
Longford to the nation”, the
late Richard Hurley outlined
his views in a lengthly interview
last Christmas. The
man behind Richard Hurley
& Associates Architects was
no stranger to the Cathedral
during the 1970’s as he had
worked with then Bishop Cahal
B. Daly to develop a new
sanctuary and altar.
But at the beginning of
this month, the man with vision
for “the new St. Mel’s”
as he called it, sadly died,
suddenly. He passed away
hours after falling ill at a
meeting which was discussing
important aspects of how
the newly renovated building
would look.
He insisted that “St. Mel’s
should be returned totally to
what it was before the fire
with the exception of the interior
furnishings and liturgical
layout”. As an architect
of renowned liturgical and
ecclesiastical experience he
had a right to hold that view;
it was his work that resulted
in the main altar and other
aspects of the Cathedral as
most people remember them
until the fire struck, for it was
principally his design. A nationally
recognised expert on
church and Cathedral restoration,
it will be reassuring for
many that the vision the late
Richard Hurley set out will
be central to the new building.
He said last year that he
feels he knows the Cathedral
as he put it himself “like the
back of my hand”.
Mr. Hurley wanted the
new layout to “change the
relationship between the
church and its congregation”
and he said he felt that
“must be reflected in the
new design”. During a conversation
which was meant
to principally about his design
of the new building, his
knowledge of the Catholic
Church, its traditions and
its somewhat changing role
in Irish society was very apparent.
Mr. Hurley said that
liturgically he wanted to
bring the Cathedral and its
new sanctuary up to date and
forward looking for the rest
of the century. The new layout
needing what he called
a new “liturgical intervention”.
Effectively what he
meant was that the altar and
sanctuary as it was known
is unlikely to resemble any-
<
The late Richard
Hurley – A Man
with a Simple Vision
thing the new Cathedral will
feature.
That is now the case and
the new altar will be located
further down the body of the
Cathedral. Even last December
as he was drafting and
considering how the new Cathedral
would look he said the
sanctuary should be “moved
further down the nave of the
Cathedral and closer to the
people”. He had the view that,
“liturgically the sanctuary is
the centre point, the placing
of the altar is the beginning
and after than everything
else will fall into place.” He
spoke of relocating the Bishop’s
Chair to what he calls a
“less judicial position, most
likely on the side of the sanctuary”,
reflecting the modern
change in how the church and
its hierarchy interact with its
people.
We now have a much
clearer image of what the
new Cathedral will look like.
Richard Hurley was from the
outset insistent that most of
the main features of the old
Cathedral would be fully
restored including, “the colouring
of the old building,
plaster work, statues, shrine
chapels and all aspects of
the stone work, including the
columns which are an integral
and important part of
the architecture of the building”.
One year on, the first
of the replacement columns
is already in place, an exact
replica of what went before.
Skilled plasterers have put
in place a small section of
plasterwork re-creating what
many thought would never
be restored.
Richard Hurley had this
vision and was insistent that
the views of the congregation
and local people would play
a key role in his design. “The
new St. Mel’s will say something
about Longford to the
nation, so as well as consulting
the various stakeholders
dialogue and discussion with
the local community will be
essential”. Asked if the views
people express would influence
the final plan Mr. Hurley
said, “of course, this will
be a reinvention of a very
important historical building
and the change in the relationship
between the church
and its congregation must be
reflected in its new design”.
Even before the project has
begun its first significant development,
that consultation
and vision he had is clear to
be seen, from the sketches of
the new Cathedral.
Richard Hurley may not
be alive to see the new building
when it is finally finished,
he may not perfect the
finer touches as any architect
would. But, his stamp, his
vision will undoubtedly be
an integral part of what we
see when the doors of the
restored St. Mel’s are eventually
opened.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:51 pm

On Wallpaintings in English Churches

http://www.visitchurches.org.uk/wallpaintings
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:58 pm

The Cathedrals and Church Buildings Library

http://www.lambethpalacelibrary.org/content/ccblibrary
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:04 pm

Online Biographical Dictionary of Sculptors in Britain 1660-1850


http://www.henry-moore.org/hmi/library/ ... in-britain
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