reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches

Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:36 pm

Radiant Light
Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral
February 25–May 18, 2014
The Cloisters museum and gardens


Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


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This exhibition of stained glass from England's historic Canterbury Cathedral features six Romanesque-period windows that have never left the cathedral precincts since their creation in 1178–80.

Founded in 597, Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest Christian structures in England. It was an important pilgrimage site in the Middle Ages—as witnessed by Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, a literary masterpiece from the fourteenth century—and is also the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the leader of the Church of England and the Anglican Communion worldwide. Recent repairs to the stonework of the magnificent historic structure necessitated the removal of several delicate stained-glass windows of unparalleled beauty. While the restoration of the walls has been undertaken, the stained glass has also been conserved.

The windows that will be shown at The Cloisters are from the clerestory of the cathedral's choir, east transepts, and Trinity Chapel. The six figures—Jared, Lamech, Thara, Abraham, Noah, and Phalec—were part of an original cycle of eighty-six ancestors of Christ, the most comprehensive stained-glass cycle known in art history. One complete window (Thara and Abraham), rising nearly twelve feet high, will be shown with its associated rich foliate border.

Masterpieces of Romanesque art, these imposing figures exude an aura of dignified power. The angular limbs, the form-defining drapery, and the encompassing folds of the mantles all add a sculptural quality to the majestic figures. The glass painting, which is attributed to the Methuselah Master, is striking for its fluid lines, clear forms, and brilliant use of color
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:39 pm

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Thara is the son of Nachor and the father of Abraham and represents, depending on the source, either the ninth or the tenth generation after Noah. During the Middle Ages, Thara was viewed negatively, as he came from the city of Ur in Mesopotamia, which was considered a hotbed of paganism, expressed here by his awkward hand gesture and uneasy twisted posture. The color of his cloak reinforced this interpretation, for yellow was associated with avarice and lust. Abraham, placed below Thara, represents the beginning of the generations leading to King David. He, in contrast, is depicted as confident and stable. The cloaks and long gowns worn by all the ancestor figures were characteristic of twelfth-century ceremonial dress of the ruling secular and ecclesiastical classes. These garments were thought to recall the dress of ancient priests and kings of the Old Testament who presaged the coming of Christ. The wide Romanesque foliate border is comparable to the rich borders that enhanced contemporary illuminated manuscripts.

Thara and Abraham were originally in a clerestory window in the northeast transept at Canterbury. Both were moved to the Great South Window in 1792. As the windows in this part of the cathedral are somewhat larger, Thara and Abraham are slightly larger than the choir figures. The border panels, which remained in the original clerestory window, have been temporarily removed and are here reunited with the figures for the first time in more than two hundred years. Abraham’s face was replaced in the twentieth century with a copy.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:45 pm

Image

Noah, the son of Lamech and the father of Shem, represents the ninth generation after Adam. He is depicted looking upward and animated as if in conversation, alluding to the biblical account of God speaking directly to Noah, instructing him to build the ark in anticipation of the Flood. The raised left knee further animates the figure. The trilobed arch at the top, supported by two capitals on columns, is the first such architectural framing known in stained glass and may have been appropriated from illuminated manuscripts produced at Canterbury. The wide Romanesque foliate border is comparable to the rich borders that enhanced contemporary illuminated manuscripts.

Noah was originally in the bottom half of a clerestory window in the northeast transept at Canterbury below Shem. The figure was probably moved to the Great South Window in the 1790s. The border panels, which remained in the original clerestory window, have been temporarily removed and are here reunited with the figure for the first time in more than two hundred years. The upper half of the original window with Shem is indicated in outline
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:49 pm

The Ancestors of Christ Windows at Canterbury CathedralCanterbury, as the seat of the archbishop of Canterbury, primate of England, was the richest and most prominent monastic cathedral in Britain and an important center of learning and the arts throughout the Middle Ages. It housed a community of Benedictine monks who commissioned some of the most famous works of English medieval art and architecture. The large stained-glass figures in the Ancestors of Christ are considered some of the finest surviving examples of monumental English painting of the period. These figures are among the first in the series and date from 1178 to about 1180. The almost sculptural gravity of the rendering of the draped bodies conveys an imposing presence. Equally impressive is the degree of psychological animation expressed in each unique character, while the group retains an overall feeling of substance and poise. The figures are complemented by a limited but rich palette and by broad and elaborately patterned borders. Depicted are the Old Testament patriarchs who represent the generations of humankind, from the Creation to the coming of Christ, underscoring the medieval Christian belief that Old Testament prophecy was fulfilled in Christ. The series originally included eighty-five ancestor figures, based primarily on the genealogy in the gospel of Luke (3:23–38). As a group, these figures symbolize the history and the continuity of the Christian faith in very human terms, as a sequence of fathers and sons.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:51 pm

Radiant Light: Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral
February 25–May 18, 2014

Thomas Becket and CanterburyThe best-known English saint, Thomas Becket was born in London in 1118. He was made an archdeacon of Canterbury in 1154, appointed chancellor to King Henry II in 1155, and became the archbishop of Canterbury in 1162. Soon thereafter, Becket came into conflict with King Henry regarding the authority of the church versus that of the king. This conflict led to Becket living in exile in France for seven years before returning to Canterbury, where knights loyal to the king murdered him on December 29, 1170. In the end, the king's attempt to silence Beckett failed. Miracles began to be recorded soon after 1171, and in 1173 Becket was declared a saint—the swiftest canonization in the history of the medieval church. His cult spread quickly, and pilgrims flocked to Canterbury. He was revered not only as a national hero but also, and primarily, as a symbol of ecclesiastical resistance to secular authority.

A fire that damaged the cathedral in 1174 presented an opportunity to redesign the eastern end. This building program included Trinity Chapel, which was completed in 1184 and housed a golden shrine for the saint's relics, dedicated in 1220. During this period the Ancestors of Christ windows in the clerestory and those in the ambulatory (walkway) around Trinity Chapel devoted to the miracles of Thomas Becket were completed.

The Ancestors of Christ series reflects this history, as it emphasizes the lineage of Christ through priesthood rather than kingship. Moreover, ancestry and succession were important themes at Canterbury, since the cathedral represents the foothold of the Christian church in England and houses the throne (or Chair) of Saint Augustine, the first archbishop of Canterbury. The Chair, used to enthrone archbishops, was an important symbol of continuity, legitimacy, and authority. This symbolism is echoed in the monumental figures of the Ancestors of Christ, all of whom are seated.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:47 pm

Hagia Sophia in Trebizond


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World heritage Trabzon Hagia Sophia must be stayed as a Museum

The church of Hagia Sofia in Trabzon, north-eastern Turkey, which is a museum today, will be converted into a mosque according to the local Vakif Direction of Trabzon, which is the owner of the estate. The reconstruction works have already been started. The mufti of the Turkish province Trabzon, Veysel Çakı, said that “the works for opening the Hagia Sophia mosque in the city to practice prayers again are going on,” and that “during the prayer the mural paintings will be covered by curtains.”
“The process of making Hagia Sofia a place of worship will not last long,” Çakı continued. According to Çakı, the Presidency of Religious Affairs has already appointed the imams for the mosque.

World heritage Trabzon Hagia Sophia must be stayed as a Museum! Support us! sign the petition!

Mosque conversion raises alarm
Christian art in Byzantine church-turned-museum is at risk after controversial court ruling



By Andrew Finkel. Museums, Issue 245, April 2013

One of the most important monuments of late Byzantium, the 13th-century Church of Hagia Sophia in the Black Sea city of Trabzon, which is now a museum, will be converted into a mosque, after a legal battle that has dramatic implications for other major historical sites in Turkey. Many in Turkey believe that the Church of Hagia Sophia is a stalking horse for the possible re-conversion of its more famous namesake in Istanbul, the Hagia Sophia Museum (Ayasofya Müzesi).
For around 50 years, responsibility for the Church of Hagia Sophia in Trabzon has rested with Turkey’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism. The courts now accept the claim made by the General Directorate of Pious Foundations, the government body responsible for most of the country’s historical mosques, that this has been an “illegal occupation”. The court has ruled that Hagia Sophia is an inalienable part of the foundation of Sultan Mehmed II who first turned the church into a mosque after his conquest of the Empire of Trebizond in 1462.

“A building covenanted as a mosque cannot be used for any other purpose,” says Mazhar Yildirimhan, the head of the directorate’s office in Trabzon. He declined to speculate on whether this would mean covering up nearly half the wall space taken up with figurative Christian art, including the dome depicting a dynamic Christ Pantocrator. “There are modern techniques for masking the walls,” he says.

The church was rescued from dereliction (it had been used variously as an arsenal and a cholera hospital) between 1958 and 1962 by the University of Edinburgh under the direction of David Talbot Rice and David Winfield. This included restoring the original ground plan and removing a prayer niche constructed into an exterior porch. The church also has an exterior frieze depicting “the Fall of Man”.

“It is the whole ensemble—architecture, sculpture and painting—that makes Hagia Sophia unique,” says Antony Eastmond of London’s Courtauld Institute of Art, who is an authority on the building. “This is the most complete surviving Byzantine structure; there is no 13th-century monument like it.”

Concern for the building is prompted by the fate of Istanbul’s Arab Mosque—originally a 14th-century Dominican church—also administered by the directorate. An earthquake in 1999 shook loose plaster from the vaults revealing frescoes and mosaics. The conservation of these paintings was finished last year but they were immediately re-covered.

Like its namesake in Trabzon, Hagia Sophia in Istanbul was also turned into a mosque, after Mehmed II’s conquest of the city in 1453. It was famously made into a museum in 1935 by cabinet decree—unlike the informal arrangement in Trabzon. The re-conversion of Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia into a mosque has long been the “golden apple” sought by Turkey’s religious right.

For such a thing to happen would have major implications for the country’s standing as a custodian of world heritage, according to one senior Western diplomat based in Istanbul.

Yet already the current government has been working on a list of historical properties administered by the Hagia Sophia Museum. In January, Istanbul’s oldest surviving church, the fifth-century St John Stoudios, which became the Imrahor Mosque in the 15th century before fire and earthquake left it in ruins, was transferred from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to the General Directorate, which plans to rebuild it as a mosque.


Turkish scholars are also up in arms at the directorate’s decision to transform another ruin, the Kesik Minare in Antalya, into a mosque. The local chamber of architects has gone to court to prevent this happening. Originally a Roman temple, the Kesik Minare has a Byzantine, Seljuk and Crusader past. A plan had already been drawn up to turn the site into an open-air museum.

Recent experience suggests that the directorate reconstructs mosques without regard for the millennia of history they contain. The restoration of the sixth-century Church of Sts Sergius and Bacchus (now the Small Ayasofya Mosque) was shrouded in secrecy and completed in 2006 without the academic community being allowed to conduct a proper survey.

Similar complaints have been levelled against the repurposing of yet another Hagia Sophia—the fifth-century basilica in Iznik where the Second Council of Nicaea was held in AD787. It was a museum, but now it is a mosque. Contrary to accepted archaeological practice, the walls were capped with an attached rather than freestanding roof. “It has lost most of its original character,” says Engin Akyurek, an archaeology professor at Istanbul University. “There is a great difference between conserving a historical building and reconstructing it so it can be used as a mosque,” he says.

Source - theartnewspaper.com

World heritage Trabzon Hagia Sophia must be stayed as a Museum! Support us! sign the petition!

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Mar 09, 2014 5:44 pm

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:02 pm

Antwerp Cathedral bells - full peal

On Sundays and Holidays before the 10. 30. The peal takes about a half an hour to ring so it starts shortly after 10 am.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4b-HeYcclQ
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:14 pm

Stefansdom in Vienna - full peal, Easter Sunday 2011



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkzGILlyWU4
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:27 pm

Stefansdom in Wien - full peal on Soelmnities



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYNnGXoAS4M
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:48 pm

Die Pummerin

The largest bell in the peal in Vienna and third largest swing bell in Europe:

http://www.stephansdom.at/dom_im_detail_pummerin.htm
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Mar 20, 2014 12:50 am

Ecclesiological Society


Thursday 10 April
Ecclesiological Society Annual lecture and AGM
Sarah Brown will talk on 'John Thornton's Stained Glass Apocalypse in the East Window of York Minster: The Creation and Conservation of a Medieval Masterpiece'
Lecture at 6.30pm; doors open 6.00pm. St Alban’s Centre, Baldwins Gardens, London, EC1N 7AB. Open to all.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Apr 09, 2014 4:18 pm

Exhibiton at the Louvre

14 March 2014 - 16 June 2014

Saint-Maurice d'Agaune : un trésor médiéval du Valais à découvrir au Louvre

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=N6dLfChv

Châsse de saint Sigismond et de ses enfants (détail), vers 1160 et premier quart du XIIIe siècle, Abbaye de Saint-Maurice d'Agaune © Trésor de l'Abbaye de Saint-Maurice. Photo Nathalie Sabato

Le Louvre accueille pour quelques semaines le trésor de l'abbaye Saint-Maurice d'Agaune, le plus ancien monastère d'Occident encore en activité, qui possède des pièces somptueuses datant du Moyen-Age à la Renaissance. L'abbaye suisse, en travaux, n'avait jamais prêté autant de pièces et certaines n'en étaient jamais sorties (du 14 mars au 16 juin 2014).

L'abbaye de Saint-Maurice va fêter les 1500 ans de sa fondation, en 515, dans le sud de la Suisse. "Depuis, il y a toujours eu une communauté religieuse, une communauté monastique puis une communauté de chanoines", explique Elisabeth Antoine-König, conservateur en chef au département des Objets d'art du musée du Louvre et co-commissaire deco l'exposition. "C'est unique en Occident", précise-t-elle.

Pour cet anniversaire, l'abbaye est en train de rénover son espace muséographique, qui abrite le trésor, et "le Louvre a obtenu le privilège" d'accueillir une partie de celui-ci, se réjouit Elisabeth Antoine-König. "Tout historien de l'art médiéval connaît le trésor de l'abbaye Saint-Maurice, mais pas le grand public", explique-t-elle. En effet, Saint-Agaune, coincé entre une falaise et le Rhône, dans le Valais, est un peu en dehors des circuits touristiques.

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=bZ7XcQF7

Saint Maurice et ses hommes massacrés par Rome
Le site était au contraire un lieu de passage important à l'époque de l'Empire Romain. Des fouilles archéologiques montrent une occupation romaine très ancienne. On était obligé de passer par le défilé rocheux d'Agaune pour se rendre de Rome vers le nord. Le lieu était surveillé par une garnison romaine. Celui qui est devenu saint Maurice était le chef d'une légion thébaine, venue en renfort de Haute-Egypte. Ses hommes étaient des chrétiens coptes et l'histoire raconte que l'empereur les a fait massacrer à la fin du 3e siècle parce qu'ils refusaient d'obéir à des ordres contraires à leur religion, comme de tuer des chrétiens.

Un siècle plus tard, Théodule, évêque du Valais, voit en songe le lieu de leur martyre, fait exhumer leurs restes et fonde une basilique. A cet endroit, en 515, le prince burgonde Sigismond établit une abbaye vouée au culte de saint Maurice et de la légion thébaine. Saint Maurice, modèle idéal du chevalier chrétien, va alors être vénéré par les plus grands souverains qui offrent à l'abbaye de précieux reliquaires.

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=8L9JMn0_

Des pièces somptueuses
La plupart des pièces de l'exposition viennent d'Agaune, mais le visiteur est accueilli par une statue en pierre prêtée par la cathédrale de Magdebourg (Allemagne). Saint Maurice est représenté en combattant en cotte de maille, et en noir africain, "une première" à l'époque.

Le trésor d'Agaune est présenté de façon chronologique, dans trois salles qui déploient des objets précieux incroyables, les plus anciens étant peut-être les plus impressionnants. Ils datent des VIe, VIIe, IXe siècles, mais le vase dit "de Saint-Martin" en sardoine, or, grenat et pierres précieuses a été créé au Ier siècle avant JC et retravaillé six siècles plus tard.

Car c'est le cas de nombreux objets, dont l'histoire est incertaine, qui ont été créés ici, retravaillés là. D'ailleurs, il pourrait y avoir eu un atelier d'orfèvrerie à Saint-Maurice même.

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=MWqlU5Ty


Histoires de reliques
Une aiguière du IXe siècle est passée d'abord pour un don de saint Martin destiné à recueillir le sang des martyrs thébains. On l'a liée plus tard à Charlemagne. Elle porte sur ses flancs de sublimes émaux cloisonnés sur or du Proche-Orient représentant sur fond vert un arbre de vie, des lions et des griffons.

Autre pièce exceptionnelle, le coffret reliquaire de Teuderic (VIIe siècle) est entièrement couvert de petites plaquettes de grenat sur paillon d'or, le tout décoré de saphirs, perles, grenats et quartz.

Le trésor de Saint-Agaume comprend de nombreux reliquaires car, au Moyen-Age, les reliques circulent. Au XIIe siècle est créée la châsse de saint Sigismond et de ses enfants, un grand coffre en argent repoussé sur lequel sont figurés Sigismond et Maurice, le Christ et les apôtres, les archanges.

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=faXH29HM

Une "Sainte Epine" offerte par Saint Louis
Le bras de Saint Bernard de Menthon (1165), en argent aussi, a sans doute abrité celui d'un martyr thébain avant de renfermer un morceau de côte et un morceau du menton de saint Bernard, fondateur de l'hospice du Grand-Saint-Bernard. A noter aussi, un magnifique chef reliquaire de saint Candide de la même époque, qui figure sur son socle le martyre de ce soldat de la légion thébaine.

Histoires de reliques, toujours : au XIIIe siècle il y a eu des échanges entre Saint Louis, qui veut développer le culte de saint Maurice, et l'abbaye d'Agaune. Saint Louis, qui a payé une fortune à Baudouin II de Constantinople pour acquérir la couronne du Christ, en a offert en 1262 une épine à l'abbaye, dans un reliquaire en or et argent, orné de pierres précieuses. En échange, des reliques d'Agaune sont parties pour Senlis.

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=nKM7jSAB

Un détour par Notre-Dame de Paris
Des manuscrits, des étoffes précieuses, des bibles complètent l'ensemble, ainsi que deux coupes du XIIIe siècle dont une, très sobre mais extraordinaire car elle "chante", grâce à une bille insérée sous le couvercle. Elle pourrait venir d'un atelier mongol.

Commencée avec une image de saint Maurice, l'exposition se termine avec une autre, de 1577, une statue équestre, donnée par le duc Emmanuel Philibert qui s'est sans doute fait représenter lui-même, bien loin du légionnaire africain du XIIIe siècle.

Les chanoines de Saint-Maurice ont accepté que leur trésor fasse le voyage de Paris, enfin une partie. Mais ils ont tenu à ce que quelques pièces soient exposées à Notre-Dame. C'est ainsi que quatre d'entre elles ont y passé un week-end avant de rejoindre le Louvre.

http://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites ... k=ekulY21P

Le Trésor de l'abbaye de Saint-Maurice d'Agaune, Musée du Louvre, Aile Richelieu
Tous les jours sauf mardi, 9h-17h30, nocturnes le mercredi et le vendredi jusqu'à 21h30
Accès avec le billet d'entrée au musée : 13€
Du 14 mars au 16 juin 2014
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Apr 09, 2014 4:56 pm

The New Peal of Bells installed at Notre Dame de Paris to mark the 850th anniversary rungen for the first time on 23 March 2013.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZcTXkZjgSc
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun May 04, 2014 10:36 pm

The Flemish Gothic Church Architecture of Alphonse Mooreloose in China

https://oar.onroerenderfgoed.be/publica ... 09-006.pdf
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun May 04, 2014 11:14 pm

Incredibly, the article above has the following footnote:


The distribution of such a basic Puginesque
type is fascinating. For example, the church of
the Nativity of Blessed Virgin Mary at Ballyhooly
(Cork), Ireland, built in 1867-1870 by architects
George C. Ashlin and Edward Welby Pugin, is a
twin of the churches of Shebiya and Gaojiayingzi
(Irish Builder, 9, 1867, 120).

As with its counterpart in Gaojiayingzi, Ballyhooly has also had its share of maurading vandals since it was built.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby apelles » Mon May 05, 2014 7:30 pm

Image

TRAIN tracks had to be installed to move a mammoth, freshly carved 7.8 tonne Italian marble altar into the newly refurbished St Mel's Cathedral in Longford.

St Mel's was left a smouldering shell after an accidental chimney fire broke out during the early hours of Christmas Day morning 2009 destroying the marble fittings and original limestone altar.

Fr Tom Healy described the installation of the new altar as a "significant turning point" in the five-year restoration plan for the cathedral.

"The altar is the centre of the cathedral, the focal point, so it was a hugely significant day for us," he told the Irish Independent.

"There is a sense of momentum and excitement surrounding the restoration. The finishing line is in sight."

The refurbished and restored cathedral will open its doors on Christmas Eve 2014.

The installation of the altar took close to four hours, tracks had to be installed in order to move it into the cathedral and a temporary gantry was constructed so the 4.75ft altar could be safely and securely lowered into place using winches and pulleys.

The specially commissioned altar, designed by master craftsmen Thomas Glendon, is part of the church's new layout which aims to bring the congregation closer to the clergy.

The parish did not disclose the value of the piece but the restoration project is valued at €30m – 95pc of which is funded by Alliance Insurance.

"I wanted the piece to be a sort of invitation to the community to gather round," the sculptor explained.

The altar is Carrara marble – the same rock used in the creation of Michelangelo's 'David'.

"It also decorates the cathedrals of Florence and Milan," Mr Glendon said. "I wanted to show the beauty of the rock, so the design is quite simple."

The altar will also feature a 5ft-wide octagonal baptismal font, which will be installed at a later date.

After the installation of the altar, Bishop Colm O'Reilly conducted a private prayer, attended by the construction workers.

Irish Independent


Image

Should be interesting to see what it looks like once they take it out of the box.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby gunter » Tue May 06, 2014 12:25 am

Unless it is the box.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby apelles » Tue May 06, 2014 12:55 am

gunter wrote:Unless it is the box.

All that hassle for a box, surely not, I tell you now, if that box is the new altar then I'm a monkey's oooh ooooh aaaah aaaah!
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue May 06, 2014 7:41 pm

apelles wrote:
gunter wrote:Unless it is the box.

All that hassle for a box, surely not, I tell you now, if that box is the new altar then I'm a monkey's oooh ooooh aaaah aaaah!



Be prepared. We may have to hold you to that.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue May 06, 2014 9:19 pm

Some rather interesting comments by Mr. Glendon on the qualities of Carrara marble:

"The altar is Carrara marble – the same rock used in the creation of Michelangelo's 'David'.

It also decorates the cathedrals of Florence and Milan," Mr Glendon said. "I wanted to show the beauty of the rock, so the design is quite simple."


Did the stone for this particular item come from the Fantiscritti quarries at Miseglia, the central of three small valleys in Carrara?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue May 06, 2014 9:28 pm

If so, this might make interesting bed-time reading:

Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Deterioration and Conservation of Stone
Edited By
V. Fassina, c/o Istituto Veneto per i Beni Culturali, Parco Scientifico Technologico, Marghera, Italy
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue May 06, 2014 9:36 pm

This where Michaelangelo got his:

Image
Praxiteles
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu May 22, 2014 5:34 pm

Metropolitan Museum of Art New York

The Pre-Raphaelite Legacy
British Art and Design
May 20–October 26, 2014

Gallery 955

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The Pre-Raphaelites galvanized the British art world in the second half of the nineteenth century with a creative vision that resonates to this day. Rejecting contemporary academic practice as vacuous and stifling, they sought to produce work that was vivid, sincere, and uplifting. Their name affirms their initial sources of inspiration: medieval and early Renaissance art from before the era of Raphael. Originally championed by a small, secret brotherhood, the movement swiftly gained adherents, who introduced new approaches and ambitions.

This exhibition brings together some thirty objects from across the Museum and from local private collections to highlight the second generation of the Pre-Raphaelites, focusing on the key figures Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Paintings, drawings, furniture, ceramics, stained glass, textiles, and book illustrations from the 1860s through the 1890s, many united for the first time, demonstrate the enduring impact of Pre-Raphaelite ideals as they were adapted by different artists and developed across a range of media. At a time of renewed appreciation for art of the Victorian age, the installation will direct fresh attention toward the Metropolitan's little-known holdings in this important area.


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Sir Edward Burne-Jones (British, 1833–1898). Angeli Laudantes, 1898. British, Merton Abbey. Dyed wool and silk on undyed cotton warp (15 warps per in.; 5-6 per cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 2008 (2008.8a–c)

The movement began as the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, founded in London in 1848 by seven young artists and writers, most notably William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Challenging convention, they painted in an archaizing style, with bright, flat color and unsparing realistic detail. The group disbanded by the mid-1850s, but its impact was far-reaching, stimulating a second generation of artists who expanded the movement's scope and appeal over the next four decades.

Leading them was the bohemian Rossetti, who mentored newcomers Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris, former theology students at Oxford. This tight-knit trio redefined Pre-Raphaelite ideals. Moving away from the exacting naturalism and moralizing subjects preferred by the early Brotherhood, the friends cultivated its romantic and imaginative aspects. Alongside medieval prototypes, they embraced classical sculpture and even High Renaissance art. Focusing on mythical and poetic themes, they endeavored to conjure a realm of heightened emotions, aspirations, and visual splendor that would elevate a modern society beset by change. They asserted, in Burne-Jones's words, "Only this is true, that beauty is very beautiful, and softens, and comforts, and inspires, and rouses, and lifts up, and never fails."

Their approach cut across traditional divisions in the arts, forging connections between painting, poetry, music, and decoration. Morris's design firm, founded in 1861, with Rossetti and Burne-Jones among the partners, fostered collaboration among artists and craftsmen, producing objects as aesthetically refined as they were technically brilliant.

Dante Gabriel Rossetti played a vital role in the Pre-Raphaelite movement as a founding member of the Brotherhood and guiding light to the second generation. A charismatic artist-poet, he attracted a circle of adherents whom he nurtured, and who inspired him in turn, most notably Burne-Jones and Morris. Although Rossetti rarely exhibited in public after 1850, disliking negative press, his passions—romanticism, medievalism, literature, and music—shaped later Pre-Raphaelite art.

From the mid-1850s Rossetti's work was defined by portrayals of gorgeous women, often personifying mystical ideas but derived from actual individuals. During an extended relationship with Elizabeth Siddal he produced ethereal images of womanhood, but after her death in 1862 he moved toward something more unabashedly sensual. Fanny Cornforth, his mistress, appears in Lady Lilith as a legendary temptress whose long golden hair symbolizes her seductive power. In the late 1860s Rossetti balanced such imagery with more spiritualized conceptions inspired by his model Alexa Wilding, and, in his last decade, he became close to Jane Burden, Morris's wife, celebrating her unconventional dark beauty in many works.
Praxiteles
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu May 22, 2014 5:37 pm

William Morris and Morris & Company

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William Morris was a brilliant polymath. Remembered today as a designer and manufacturer of textiles, wallpaper, and stained glass, he was equally renowned in his lifetime as a poet and novelist. An avid socialist, he fought class inequities, and he also campaigned to preserve green spaces and ancient monuments. Morris fervently subscribed to the Pre-Raphaelites' belief that medieval exemplars could be used to improve the present. Opposed to industrial mass production, he advocated tradition-minded practices, believing that beautiful objects, honestly made, would promote a better society.

To this end, in 1861 the young entrepreneur helped found the decorative arts firm of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company. His ingenuity was the driving force behind the enterprise, but it also showcased the talents of Burne-Jones, Rossetti, Ford Madox Brown, and architect Philip Webb. In 1875 Morris became sole director of the reconfigured Morris & Company. His predilection for historical techniques ensured that profits were modest, and, despite his socialist ideals, his wares were often affordable only to the wealthy. Nevertheless, the company's designs became iconic and many remain in production. Bird hung in Morris's own drawing room at Kelmscott House, Hammersmith, London.

Above: Designed by William Morris (British, 1834–1896). Bird, designed 1878. Manufactory: Morris & Company. British, Merton Abbey, Surrey. Wool. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Edward C. Moore Jr. Gift, 1923 (23.163.15)
Praxiteles
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Posts: 6060
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 7:02 pm

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