reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches

Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Apr 19, 2013 11:12 pm

Here is St. Nicholas in Nantes (1841) which seems to have undergone a fairly thorough restoration in the last few years:



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The architect is Jean-Baptiste Lassus and the prototype is Saint-Martin des Bois near Beauvais, ironically not too far distant from Abeville: http://tchorski.morkitu.org/10/st-martin-aux-bois-01.htm
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Apr 19, 2013 11:28 pm

Some more information on Saint Martin aux Bois:

http://saint-martin-aux-bois.org/
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Fearg » Sun Apr 21, 2013 11:48 pm

Armagh Cathedral

Don't believe these have been posted before - the lady chapel and side altars pre 1982.
armagh lady chapel.jpg
armagh lady chapel.jpg (20.36 KiB) Viewed 8214 times
armagh side altars.jpg
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Fearg » Wed Apr 24, 2013 8:42 pm

Armagh again.. thinking about where these side altars were located in the cathedral, now explains something I had wondered about. Its pretty obvious really, when the cathedral was decorated in mosaic no one would have dreamt that the walls behind these side altars would ever be seen, when they were removed in the 80s, the undecorated walls would have been exposed which explains the rather odd position that the victorian confessionals now occupy (to hide the bare walls). Anyone know where they were located previously? - can't see them in any of the photos I have..
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby apelles » Tue Apr 30, 2013 5:01 pm

gunter wrote:What do the gentlemen of this thread know of the work of a Dublin stained glass artist called John Casey, who sometimes traded as J & D Casey, of Moore Street and later Marlborough Street, 1830s to 1870s?


Not a lot out there Gunter, you've probably already seen this http://www.dia.ie/architects/view/429#tab_works

And he gets a little mention on this.

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby gunter » Tue Apr 30, 2013 11:06 pm

Thanks for that apelles, I did have the Dictionary of Irish Architects reference, but not the interesting footnotes.

As former occupants of 16 Moore Street, it would have been interesting if the Caseys had crossed the path of Pearce's old man, given that they were all in the Gothic church fitting out business together, but neither the dates, nor the projects, seem to overlap. It was just a thought.

Here's one you're going to struggle with:

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This is the magnificent baroque altar [you'll know the correct term] of a chapel built about 1700 and dedicated to St. Patrick.

I will be seriously impressed if ye know where this is to be found.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 3:27 pm

Dowe take it that we are in the domains of the Spanish monarquia?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 7:32 pm

Perhaps the Iglesia Nuestra Segnora de la Peña de Francia in Porto de la Cruz in Tenerife ?

If so, this is the Retablo de la Inmaculada Concepción, late XVII century, dominated by the arms of the kingdom of Ireland (just visible behind the chain of the sanctuary lamp), and the gift of the Walsh family to the parish. The attic has a picture of the Cristo de La Laguna. The upper register, has a descent from the Cross flanked by the apparition of Our lady and the Christ Child to Santa Rosalia of Palermo and a Assumption of Our Lady. The niches in the lower register have statues of Santa Rita of Cascia, a Madonna and St. Patrick. The altar mensa is a a late 19th century reproduction of the original.

It may be currently run by the Augustinians.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby gunter » Mon May 06, 2013 8:07 pm

My God, you're good!

I was just going to lay out some red herring trails, when you jumped straight in there with the identification. Inglesia de Nuestra Senora de la Pena Francia [Our Lady of the Rock of France], Puerto de la Cruz on the northern coast of Tenerife. Apparently the church is located quite close to a Molly Malone pub for those seeking the authentic Irish experience on their holidays in the Canaries.

You will, however, not be able to tell me what the Dutch Billy connection is, surely?

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The aforesaid Bernardo Walsh
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 9:15 pm

If not mistaken, this family operated out of Cadiz and had large shipping interests. In the 18th century, I think the head of the family moved to France and bought himself a seigneurie near Nantes. His letter books are still extant and show how he conductde his business a lunga mano.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 9:22 pm

Other Irish families working out of Jerez de la frontiera Southern Spain in the 17 th century were the Goughs from Dublin and the Morgans. A scion of both families was Fra Francisco Gough y Fletcher Morgan Cabeza de Vaca - the great patron of Bartolomeo Esteban Murillo !!
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 9:26 pm

gunter wrote:My God, you're good!

I was just going to lay out some red herring trails, when you jumped straight in there with the identification. Inglesia de Nuestra Senora de la Pena Francia [Our Lady of the Rock of France], Puerto de la Cruz on the northern coast of Tenerife. Apparently the church is located quite close to a Molly Malone pub for those seeking the authentic Irish experience on their holidays in the Canaries.

You will, however, not be able to tell me what the Dutch Billy connection is, surely?

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The aforesaid Bernardo Walsh


Do not tell me that Bernardo Walsh had something to do with Thomas Street, Dublin?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 9:29 pm

Have you seen this:

SNIPPET: Irish emigrants of the late 17th century , in particular, established strong links between Ireland and the Canaries Many Irish Catholic merchant families with business connections with Spain fled from Ireland after the Cromwellian and Williamite confiscations and plantations. Their commerical links with Spain through the wine trade led them to the Canaries where they began to build new lives and fortunes in Tenerife and Gran Canaria.

The names of Irish emigrants to the Canaries in historical records include: Walsh (which became Valois), Murphy, Meade, Brooke (which became Arroyo), O'Shanahan, Callaghan (which changed to Cologan), Madden (now Madan), Fitzgerald, Commyns, Power, Creagh, White (now Blanco), Hanty, Key Wadding, Roche, O'Shea, Russell, Forrestal, Lynch, O'Daly, MacGee and many others. The Cologan family is still prospering in Puerto de la Cruz. One of them became the Marquis de la Candia and his fine house and private chapel can be seen in the La Paz district of the city. There are streets in Santa Cruz, the capital of Tenerife, and in Puerto de la Cruz named after Leopoldo O'Donnell, first Duke of Tetuan, Jose Murphy, Cologan, Valois and Blanco.

The great houses of some of these emigre families are still to be seen in Tenerife, like the Hotel Marquesa in Puerto de la Cruz which was the palatial home of Bernardo Walsh from Waterford, or the old Royal Custom House overlooking the little harbour of Puerto de la Cruz which was once the residence of the Commyns family. The tomb of Bernardo Walsh and his wife, Francisca Fitzgerald (of another Waterford family) is in a side chapel dedicated to St. Patrick in the church of Nuestra Senore Pena de Francia in Puerto de la Cruz and a huge painting of St. Patrick, donated by Bernardo to the church, is displayed there every St. Patrick's Day.

Families such as these brought with them to Tenerife such customs as the veneration of Patrick and also St. Fiacre, the local patron saint of gardeners, who is depicted in paintings in many houses in Tenerife. The tradition of lighting bonfires on 22 June, the eve of the feast of St. John was alive in Tenerife as in Ireland until recently.

-- Excerpt, "Irish Roots" magazines 1997 #1
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 06, 2013 9:37 pm

A bit more on him:

http://bernardocabo.blogspot.it/2010/07 ... -1727.html

And the family was connected with the Goughs.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby gunter » Tue May 07, 2013 9:15 pm

Praxiteles wrote:Do not tell me that Bernardo Walsh had something to do with Thomas Street, Dublin?


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Bernardo's tomb in front of the altar of St.Patrick's chapel

Not Thomas Street, sadly, the 'Billy' connection is with Waterford. Quite a good summary of Bernardo's life and family in translation in that blog. There is also a recently published book on Bernardo called Dios, Clan y Negocio [God, Family and Business] by Agustin Guimera Ravina, which includes, in an appendix, Bernardo's own memoirs in English.

Briefly; the Walsh family had been Waterford merchants of long standing until the change in the political climate in the second half of the 17th century prompted them to decamp to the Canary Islands. Bernard Walsh, the last head of the family to have been born in Waterford [20 Aug. 1663], left the city in August 1679 in an exile that eventually took him to Tenerife where the family, and a batch of other Catholic merchant families of Waterford, had already become established.

Bernard Walsh [Bernardo Valois] in particular prospered as a trader and wine exporter, although in what must have been an occupational hazard he developed the gout that he was to spend much of his life trying to get relief from.

Bernardo never severed his links with Waterford and when news reached him of his aged mother's death in March 1711 he had 'oficios and masses said for her soul in the city and port and all the convents.' The most enduring Walsh connection with Waterford, following their journey into exile, was their patronage of the Holy Ghost Hospital in the city.

Henry and Patrick Walsh had founded the hospital in 1545 by purchasing a portion of the recently dissolved Franciscan Friary within the walls of the city. The new hospital was dedicated to the care of sick and infirm of both sexes and the hospital charter, in return for their continued patronage, gave the Walsh family the right to nominate the master, subject to the approval of the Corporation.

The Holy Ghost Hospital remained a Catholic institution throughout this period, despite the absence from the city of their primary patrons and despite the fact that the composition of Waterford Corporation had become exclusively Protestant after 1690. It seems that the Corporation were content to allow the hospital function, with all its mass celebrating papist rituals, throughout the era of the Penal Laws and the records suggest that the masters appointed in this period, who were all Corporation members and Protestants, conducted intermittent correspondence with the Walsh family in Tenerife, usually inviting them to send money under various guises.

The Waterford chroniclers, Smith and later Ryland, each noted that a tablet over the main door recorded that the hospital had been repaired and enlarged in 1741 and 1743 by the Corporation. The interesting thing, from a social and architectural point of view, is that this repair/enlargement of the hospital carried out by the Corporation did not seem to serve the purpose of improving in any way the quality of the accommodation, which remained grim and medieval, but it did have the effect of grafting a new brick, triple-gabled, frontage onto the crumbling edifice, literally giving the Holy Ghost Hospital a Protestant facade!

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The Holy Ghost Hospital in Waterford shortly before demolition. The ruins of the Franciscan Friary remain

A photograph of the hospital, shortly before its demolition in the 1890s, survives and has been reproduced in a recent book on Irish Gothic Architecture and although the building had clearly been ravaged by decay over a prolonged period and patched in the most haphazard fashion, just enough of the new,18th century, gabled facade was still discernible to hint at the remarkable history encapsulated in this wonderfully complex building, which was afterwards reduced back to just the ruins of the Franciscan Friary that we can see today.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu May 09, 2013 9:01 pm

Ah! all is revealed!!
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sat May 11, 2013 6:01 pm

Baptismal Theology and Practice in the Age of St. Thomas Aquinas


http://www.dspt.edu/site/default.aspx?P ... PageID=237
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sat May 18, 2013 12:00 pm

From the Osservatore Romano (18 May 2013)

Ancora manca il modello
di Antonio Paolucci
Director General of the Vatican Museums


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Quando un edificio destinato al culto (si tratti di una chiesa cristiana o di una sinagoga, di una moschea islamica o di un tempio scintoista) è "giusto"? Quando cioè lo possiamo definire allo stesso tempo bello, funzionale e simbolicamente efficace? La risposta è una sola, non ammette deviazioni né varianti.
Un edificio destinato al culto si può dire riuscito e diventare perciò un'opera d'arte quando la cultura dell'epoca che lo ha voluto si identifica con le forme architettoniche e artistiche tipiche di quel culto, quando ne sostanzia e ne sostiene, significandoli e trasfigurandoli, i sentimenti, le idee e la dottrina. Prendiamo l'età del Barocco. Il Barocco che è stato l'ultimo grande stile internazionale di matrice cattolica. Ci sarà pure una ragione se San Marcello al Corso o San Carlino alle Quattro Fontane a Roma hanno i loro cloni a Lima e all'Avana, a Santiago del Cile e a Santo Domingo, se le chiese conventuali di Napoli o di Palermo le incontriamo uguali, nella planimetria, nel decoro artistico, nella organizzazione simbolica a Goa in India, a Macao in Cina, a Cracovia in Polonia? Questo succede per una ragione precisa. La cultura del Seicento è immaginifica, metaforica, teatrale, vuole toccare il cuore, accarezzare i sensi, sollecitare insieme le passioni e la fantasia.
Ebbene, quella cultura è entrata nell'immaginario religioso ed è diventata arte sacra.
Queste cose ho detto il 14 maggio scorso in Campidoglio, presenti il sindaco Gianni Alemanno e il cardinale vicario Agostino Vallini, parlando del volume Electa curato da Liberio Andreatta, Marco Petreschi e Nilda Valentin che illustra le 45 nuove chiese costruite nella diocesi di Roma fra il 2000 e il 2013. Il libro è bello e importante, deve essere considerato una vera e propria antologia, o piuttosto un manuale, di edilizia sacra italiana contemporanea. Organizzato in schede, ognuna fornita di eccellente documentazione fotografica a colori, il volume presenta una serie di opere di indubbia qualità.
È ormai entrato nei manuali l'edificio di Meier, impropriamente noto come le Vele. Non di vele in realtà si tratta ma di tre gusci in cemento bianco che qualificano un edificio assolutamente pregevole ma che potrebbe funzionare altrettanto bene per un museo in Texas o per un auditorium a Melbourne. Mi piace di più, non foss'altro perché ha tentato di dare una connotazione trascendente allo spazio presbiteriale, il Santo Volto di Gesù di Piero Sartogo con quella copertura leggera aerea che innerva lo spazio alludendo alla forma simbolica di un grande rosone gotico fuori scala.
Altre volte la chiesa è concepita come un blocco organico, articolato in spazio del culto e in servizi parrocchiali; la chiesa intesa come una specie di fortino chiamato a presidiare il deserto multiculturale e multietnico delle sterminate periferie romane. Penso alla parrocchia dei Santi Elisabetta e Zaccaria di Giuliano Panieri. In qualche caso intervengono suggestioni neobarocche (il San Pio da Pietrelcina di Alessandro Anselmi) oppure si propongono assetti più tradizionali anche se modulati nelle forme e nelle proporzioni della contemporaneità. Così Sandro Benedetti in Santa Maria a Setteville.
Gli esempi potrebbero continuare e i risultati sono quasi sempre di pregio. Manca però - questa è in estrema sintesi la mia impressione - la "forma chiesa". L'edificio bello, funzionale, simbolicamente efficace in grado di servire da modello, ancora non c'è. Almeno io non l'ho trovato.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby apelles » Thu May 23, 2013 10:46 pm

Praxiteles wrote:Perhaps the Iglesia Nuestra Segnora de la Peña de Francia in Porto de la Cruz in Tenerife ?

If so, this is the Retablo de la Inmaculada Concepción, late XVII century, dominated by the arms of the kingdom of Ireland (just visible behind the chain of the sanctuary lamp), and the gift of the Walsh family to the parish. The attic has a picture of the Cristo de La Laguna. The upper register, has a descent from the Cross flanked by the apparition of Our lady and the Christ Child to Santa Rosalia of Palermo and a Assumption of Our Lady. The niches in the lower register have statues of Santa Rita of Cascia, a Madonna and St. Patrick. The altar mensa is a a late 19th century reproduction of the original.

It may be currently run by the Augustinians.


Now I have to say thats impressive Praxiteles, I had started off looking for that in Spain alright but soon gave up when I was finding that there are lots of similar Spanish made Reredos dedicated to St. Patrick that been exported to places as far flung as Mekico & other ex-Spanish colonies . . I'd love to be as cognizant on these topics.

Might any of you be able to throw some light on identifying the architect of this one, its the Nativity Roman Catholic Church in Kilcormac, County Offaly

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More images here http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/s ... o=14815012
Description
Detached Roman Catholic church, built c.1880, with six-bay nave, lean-to side aisles, chancel to west and sacristy to south-west. Built on the site of a former chapel. Pitched slate roofs with limestone coping, carved stone cross finials, limestone chimneystack and cast-iron rainwater goods. Terracotta ridge cresting to sacristy and chancel. Cut stone bellcote to east gable. Snecked limestone walls with dressed stone quoins. Pointed-arched window openings with block-and-start surrounds and stained glass to nave. Rose window to east elevation. Traceried stained glass windows to chancel and western aisle. Shoulder-arched openings to sacristy. Pointed-arched door openings with limestone block-and-start surrounds, hoodmouldings with floral stops and double timber battened doors. Timber roof trusses to interior. Grave markers to yard. Stone grotto in corner of yard near pointed-arched gateway with cast-iron gate to convent. Cross from Cistercian monastery in boundary wall. Churchyard bounded by random coursed wall with ruled-and-lined wall to eastern end with piers and cast-iron gates. Swivel cast-iron pedestrian gate.

Appraisal
This Roman Catholic church is of both architectural and artistic merit. The finely executed stonework, including the stone dressings, bellcote and finials attest to excellent craftsmanship at the time of construction. Features such as the stained glass windows and also some of the decorative stonework add artistic interest to the site. The grave markers, stone grotto and wall mounted cross enhance the setting, which is completed by the boundary walls and gate piers. Together with the neighbouring convent, the Nativity Church forms part of a group of ecclesiastical structures at the centre of Kilcormac.

old interior painting 1879.jpg


Image

The first image above is a bit of a rarity I think, its an oil painting of the interior from 1879 which hangs in the sacristy, painted from before the apse was added in 1907.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sat May 25, 2013 7:45 pm

From the additional images published in the Buildings of Ireland, the PP could do with giving the door a good lick of varnish.

Also, in those pictures, Praxiteles is not at at all sure as to the authenticity of the hinges - they look just a little too like each other to be original and very like a bad set of cheap reproduction plastered onto the doors of the Imaculate Conception of Our Lady in Kanturk, Co. Cork.

Are there any other examples of this type of church in or about the ocation of this one?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 27, 2013 9:27 pm

[align=]Monument by Duncan Stroik to Columba Marmion[/align]




Image



Rome, Italy, Nov 15, 2012 / 12:22 am (CNA).- Cardinal Raymond L. Burke recently unveiled a monument he commissioned for his titular church – Saint Agatha of the Goths – of a saintly Irish monk who was ordained there in 1881.

“Cardinal Burke loves to build and loves to beautify … and this is a monument to this great man and this great event in his life, to remind us where this saint was ordained,” said Duncan G. Stroik, the monument's designer, in a Nov. 14 interview with CNA.

The monument, to Blessed Columba Marmion which was dedicated Oct. 25, is located on the side aisle of the church and features a bas relief profile of the blessed above a Latin inscription.

The inscription proclaims, “Here in the church of Saint Agatha of the Goths, June 16, 1881, Joseph Marmion was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Dublin by Tobias Kirby, rector of the Irish College. Then, after entering the Order of Saint Benedict and taking the name Columba at the Abbey of Maredsous, he was elected the third abbot of the same community.”

“Excelling in priestly virtue and renowned for his sanctity, he died January 30, 1923, and was beatified September 3, 2000 by Pope John Paul II.”

It also notes that “His Eminence Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke took care to erect this monument in AD 2012.”

Stroik said that the extraordinary beauty of Roman churches is due to the fact that they are cared for by cardinals. Part of being made a cardinal by the Pope is that each cardinal receives a titular church.

“It's the cardinals' responsibility to take care of their titular church, that's why churches in Rome have been so beautified, is because the cardinals are spending money on their churches,” Stroik said.

When Cardinal Burke was given Saint Agatha of the Goths, he saw that “here's a man who is going to be named a saint in matter of time, and there's no monument to him in the church where he was ordained, so that was the impetus for the monument,” Stroik recalled.

Reflecting on the importance of beauty in drawing man's heart to Christ, Stroik said, “Are not our churches theology in stone? Beauty draws us in and affects us … when we do things for the glory of God, it should be our best. Since he is beauty, our best should be beautiful.”

The monument is made of Giallo marble – to “pick up the beautiful rich marbles in the apse” – and the abbot's profile was sculpted by Giuseppe Ducrot.

Stroik said it was designed to be both unique and to fit in with the rest of the church in a harmonious way. Below the inscription is a coat of arms for Bl. Marmion, which features an abbot's crozier and two shamrocks to represent his native land.

Joseph Marmion was born in Dublin in 1858 and went to the Pontifical Irish College in Rome for his final seminary studies. At the time, Saint Agatha of the Goths was the site of the Irish College.

He served as a parish priest, professor, and spiritual director while he served the Dublin archdiocese.

After five years as a diocesan priest, he obtained permission from his bishop to join the Benedictine monastery of Maredsous, Belgium. After becoming abbot, he continued to devote himself to spiritual direction, focusing his retreats on Christ as the model for the life of Christians.

His classic spiritual works include “Christ, the Life of the Soul,” “Christ in his Mysteries,” “Christ the Ideal of the Monk,” and “Christ the Ideal of the Priest.”

Stroik has authored a book, “The Church Building as a Sacred Place: Beauty, Transcendence, and the Eternal,” which will be available in Dec. 2012 from Liturgy Training Publications.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon May 27, 2013 9:35 pm

[align=]Marmion Monument in Sant'Agata in Rome[/align]


http://www.stroik.com/portfolio/blessed ... -monument/
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:03 pm

Modern Catholic churches resemble museums, says Vatican

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Opposition is mounting in the Holy See to a spate of recent, ultra-modern churches, in Italy and abroad, by high profile architects.
"The lack of integration between the architect and the faith community has at times been negative," said Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, head of the Vatican's Pontificial Council for Culture. "Sometimes it goes wrong."

Cardinal Ravasi said a church built in 2009 in Foligno, Italy by the celebrated Italian architect Massimiliano Fuksas, which resembles a monolithic concrete cube, has been "highly criticised".

In his native town of Merate in Lombardy, Cardinal Ravasi said the local priest needed to bring his own image of the Madonna to mass, because Mario Botta, the architect who designed the church, had not installed one.

"The problem is that in Catholicism, unlike Protestantism, things like the altar, the images, are essential, while architects tend instead to focus on space, lines, light and sound," said Cardinal Ravasi.

The last architects to work closely with the church were back in the 17th century Baroque era, he added.

Cardinal Ravasi's attack was backed last month by Antonio Paolucci, the head of the Vatican museums, when he spoke at the launch of a book celebrating the building of dozens of new churches in the suburbs of Rome since the 1990s.

Instead of praising the churches, Mr Paolucci lashed out, claiming that: "At best, these are like museums, spaces that do not suggest prayer or meditation."

Cardinal Ravasi conceded that one of Rome's most controversial new churches – Richard Meier's Jubilee Church, which resembles a yacht with spinnakers hoisted – had won over locals, but complained that "the building materials were the focus of pre-construction meetings, not the liturgical life".

Cardinal Ravasi was speaking after inaugurating the Vatican's first ever art exhibit at the Venice Biennale on Saturday, which focuses on the Book of Genesis through photography and paintings by a Los Angeles artist, Lawrence Carroll, who uses melting ice in one work.

Vatican officials believe the show can help heal what they call a century old "fracture" between religion and art, and Cardinal Ravasi said the Church now had its sights on commissioning modern liturgical art, for installing in churches.

"The Venice Biennale exhibit has been the first step on a journey," he said. "Further down the line could come liturgical art, meaning we could commission modern artists to create altars, fonts, tabernacles, lecterns, pews and kneelers," he added.

But after letting modern architects push the envelope too far, the Church will keep a wary eye on liturgical art commissions, he said.

"We will need to build up dialogue with artists before we commission any liturgical art," he said.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:28 pm

BENEDICT XVI AND BEAUTY IN SACRED ART AND ARCHITECTURE. Eds. Vincent Twomey, SVD, and Janet Rutherford (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011)

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BENEDICT XVI AND BEAUTY IN SACRED ART AND ARCHITECTURE. Eds. Vincent Twomey, SVD, and Janet Rutherford (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011)
Not every Catholic has an opinion on the theological controversies of the day. But every Catholic has strong opinions on the architecture and decoration of the church in which he or she worships. The placement of the tabernacle, the redesign of the sanctuary, the removal of a favorite statue, the entry of a new tapestry, even the choice of carpet over tile can plunge the most placid parish into a state of civil war. The pitched battles over material church design have intensified since Vatican II, given the bitter divisions over the proper praxis and theology of worship itself. We seem to have moved beyond the sterile, glass-box minimalism of the 1970s but the new generation of stylized neo-Romanesque, neo-Byzantine, and neo-Gothic churches often has the cloying charm of a cartoonish pop-up book.
Papers from the Second Fota International Liturgy Conference—this collection of Benedict XVI, and questions of sacred art and architecture—provide a sophisticated theoretical perspective on our current dilemma over the buildings and objects we use in worship. Janet Rutherford’s meditation on the Seventh Ecumenical Council, which condemned iconoclasm and defended the use of religious iconography, demonstrates the relevance of that council’s judgment for guiding the contemporary church through similar iconoclastic temptations. Several papers highlight the specific contribution of Benedict XVI to the debate. Joseph Murphy’s study of Cardinal Ratzinger’s reflections on the face of Christ indicates how the Passion can serve as a criterion of beauty for the creation of an authentically Christian art. Uwe Michael Lang suggests the various ways in which the pope emeritus’ writings provide a theological foundation for the practice of church architecture. Duncan Stroik uses Benedict’s works to sketch the various ways in which all substantial artworks, not only specifically religious ones, reflect divine attributes.
Especially noteworthy is Alcuin Reid’s study of the vicissitudes of “noble simplicity,” a key term in Vatican II’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, but it is an elusive one. The term was originally used by liturgical historians to distinguish the comparative sobriety of the Latin rite from the more lyrical court liturgies of the Eastern rites. By the time of Vatican II’s mandate for liturgical reform, a descriptive term had become a normative one. “Noble simplicity” was now an elusive goal to be sought in the simplification of rites, the fabrication of new vestments, the pruning of popular devotions, and the search for a more accessible type of congregational music. In the aftermath of Vatican II, this ideal simplicity was used to authorize a certain minimalism and bland functionalism in worship. A new iconoclasm had crept into the sanctuary.
This collection of scholarly papers moves beyond simple lamentation over the uninspiring architecture, vesture, and music which seem to be the fate of contemporary American Catholicism. It provides theological depth for an accurate discernment of the sources of this malaise and for successful resistance to the kitsch iconoclasm threatening to overwhelm us.
-Rev. John J. Conley, S.J.
Loyola University Maryland
Baltimore, Maryland
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:35 pm

Vatican to spend millions on new churches... and on artists to furnish them

Art may have become the new religion, to judge by the queues for many of our major exhibitions, but now it looks as though religion is going to become the new focus of artists.

The Vatican has revealed that it is going to spend millions of euros on building new churches, and it wants to commission the world's greatest contemporary artists to furnish them.

This year marks the 500th anniversary of Michelangelo's Creation of Adam on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, and Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, the president of the Pontifical Council for Culture, said that it was time for the church to re-establish its role as a major patron of contemporary art.

"Art and faith are sisters," he said. "They both have the same aim of discovering the foundations of reality – not just reflecting the superficial."

He was speaking at the opening of the Venice Biennale, the world's pre-eminent contemporary art festival, in which the Holy See has taken part for the first time. It has spent ¤750,000 on building a pavilion in one of the most prominent positions on the exhibition site and filled it with the first of the cutting-edge art pieces it has commissioned.

Interactive films made by the Milanese art group Studio Azzurro, based on the Book of Genesis, feature deaf performers enacting the creation of animals and prisoners that of man.

It leads on to a room of photographs showing man's destruction of the environment, by the Czech artist Josef Koudelka, and concludes with a painting covered in ice that is slowly melting, by the American-Italian artist Lawrence Carroll.

"Our presence at the Biennale is the first step in a long journey that involves not only the building of churches in a contemporary style, but the creation of new liturgical objects," Cardinal Ravasi said. He confirmed that contemporary artists will be paid to design new altars, baptismal fonts, tabernacles and lecterns.

Among his favourite architects, he said, are the Spanish Santiago Calatrava and the Japanese Tadao Ando, as well as past Modernist masters, Le Corbusier and Alvar Aalto.

"We will get artists from all continents involved and in particular we need women artists; they have another language."

A plan to fill one of the rooms of the pavilion in Venice with work by the Colombian-born sculptor Doris Salcedo, featuring flowers of the Amazon, was thwarted by incessant rain over the last week in the Italian city, he said.

The move into contemporary art and architecture is a clear attempt by the Vatican to open its doors at a time when, rocked by scandal, it stands accused of being out of touch and secretive.

The cardinal, who writes his own tweets, has criticised priests in the past for their "boring" and "irrelevant" sermons, and is one of the prime movers in the effort to make the church more relevant to the secular society of Western Europe.

In an effort to embrace other aspects of popular culture, he is also launching a Vatican cricket team. He was ordained in 1966, is a former professor and archeological scholar, and was widely tipped to become the new pope earlier this year.

His affection for paintings developed, he said, when as the prefect of the Ambrosian library for 20 years he saw, on an almost daily basis, a Caravaggio painting of a fruit basket that hung on the library's walls.

"It pushed me into a surprising new form of linguistics," he said.

The programme of designing the new churches will begin next year, to be followed by the fine art commissions thereafter.

"For 20 centuries art and faith walked together, but in the last 50 years they have been separated," Cardinal Ravasi concluded. "It is time now to get over that divorce.
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