Stephenson - poacher turned gamekeeper?

Postby alan d » Wed Feb 04, 2004 6:52 pm

Jings Greg......now you've lit the blue touch paper.

It's my city and I love it and it has its good points and bad, like Dublin.

The high rise developements as insensitive as they are to us now were to replace the overcrowded and decaying building stock left after the war.

Kids were dying in the Gorbals where a family of ten lived in a single room or single end as we called it...... open plan high rise blocks on the outskirts of the city with access to fresh air seemd like a good idea at the time.

Unfortunately the concert hall was built before the lottery so high cost public buildings could only be obtained by giving developers prime land to build their retail schemes and in return they provided the venue as a proportion of the scheme.

So unfortunatly we have a massive retail outlet with a concert hall attached. It is also rather FASCIST because Lesley Martin died and it was left to lesser architects to complete the job.
alan d
Senior Member
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 2:07 pm
Location: glasgow

Postby d_d_dallas » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:22 pm

Settle for Edinburgh... euuuuw!

Stagnant stagnant stagnant. Lovely place to visit - in a theme park kind of way. Wouldn't ever want to live there.

Glasgow has so much more charm and life - it has a tale to tell with the scars to prove it.
d_d_dallas
Senior Member
 
Posts: 850
Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2003 2:27 pm
Location: Ireland

Postby alan d » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:29 pm

and they've just appointed Terry Farrell as their design Tsar.............really what more need be said?
alan d
Senior Member
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 2:07 pm
Location: glasgow

Postby GrahamH » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:30 pm

Glasgow is very fine, from what I can recall from a fleeting visit many moons ago.

I totally agree Alan about Georgian and streamlined modern working together, by their nature they are compatible.
But my point is about the character and completeness of the area, no amount of 'sympathy' or cleaniness of modern design can contibute to this.
In Dublin, this area is all we have of a distinctive complete set of historic buildings.
It's not as if Dublin is a museum city, or the Venice of northern Europe! This is a very small, compact area, and should be consolidated.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Postby PVC King » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:32 pm

I think you would find a lot of Irish people live in Edinburgh, either as students or work in the professions.

Not having a go at Glasgow because it has progressed a lot, but it is not in the same league as Edinburgh.

Very few cities were as unscathed by WW2 and Edinburgh was one of the first cities to cry halt to Appollo house type of architecture in the 1960's.

Now that modern architecture has progressed to a level of maturity and design is considered 'good' because it is good and not because it is new and shiny possibly Edinburgh should revisit its development policy.

But to say that Edinburgh is bad becuase it prevented the 'Lower Mount St' phase that plagued Dublin is ridiculous.

At least in Edinburgh you have good streetscapes within which to place sufficiently high quality contemporary buildings. ;)
PVC King
 

Postby GrahamH » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:42 pm

Why does no one ever mention Bath?
It's always Edinburgh this, Edinburgh that...!

We had a rather nasty handbrake incident on one of its notorious 90 degree hills - pretty scary.
Anyway, when you see the likes of Bath or Edinburgh, you really do see how bone lazy they were in Dublin with regard to set pieces and unified facades.
To a large part they couldn't even be bothered to get parapet heights even, although the Gardiners made a good attempt later on.
More Irish than the Irish themselves springs to mind.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Postby shaun » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:49 pm

alan d, first of all, greetings to our Scottish friend......So how complete a Victorian city would Dublin or Belfast be in comparison with Glasgow, seeing that all three are essentially British cities that grew up when the UK consisted of all of the British Isles. I've haven't been to Glasgow yet, wouldn't mind going just to have a look at the Rennie MackIntoshs' art school.
shaun
Member
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2003 8:30 pm
Location: Antwerp

Postby alan d » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:55 pm

I can only tell you as a visitor Graham.......I love Dublin for it's "incompleteness"

Sure a complete set of historic buildings are important to an extent but it's diversity and vitality and an interest in its future that make a city great.

All fur coat and no knickers, Diaspora. That's Auld Reekie.
alan d
Senior Member
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 2:07 pm
Location: glasgow

Postby phil » Wed Feb 04, 2004 8:05 pm

That is what I love about somewhere like St. Stephens Green. Although I hate the pastiche or the Stephens Green Centre on many levels I still love the way in which the whole green is such a hotch-botch of buildings. A jumble of styles which have built up over the years.
phil
Old Master
 
Posts: 1467
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2003 12:32 pm

Postby FIN » Thu Feb 05, 2004 10:34 am

a tale for all seasons...
FIN
Senior Member
 
Posts: 826
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2001 12:00 am
Location: dublin

Postby phil » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:31 am

Yeah Fin, maybe it's a bit like the way Alvy (Woody Allen) describes California when he goes there during Annie Hall:

“Yeah, the architecture is really consistent,
isn't it? French next to Spanish, next to Tudor, next to Japanese.”
phil
Old Master
 
Posts: 1467
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2003 12:32 pm

Postby FIN » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:39 am

makes the place interesting though!
the old saying " too much of a good thing is a bad thing"
FIN
Senior Member
 
Posts: 826
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2001 12:00 am
Location: dublin

Postby PVC King » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:56 am

Quote "I still love the way in which the whole green is such a hotch-botch of buildings"

It always was there were 18 individual buildings between the College of Surgeons and Rices Bar (the entrance to the Stephens Green SC)

There were 143 individual buildings on the Green that up to 1960 would have changed sporadically due to accidents such as fires.

With the exception of the Lisney building at No 25 every addition since 1960 is crap.

With particular reference to

62-65 The Bank of Scotland offices
66-68 Hainault House
69-71 The Dept of Justice

Russell House (KPMG)

The Ardilaun Centre Eircom Blocks A +B

57-59 The Pastiche Irish Permanant HQ

44-45 The Corner of Hume St (Ivor Fitz)

26 Compustore

15-18 Stephen Court (Anglo-Irish)

An unmitaged disaster of crap
PVC King
 

Postby FIN » Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:18 pm

as i'm sure the other ones were thought of in their day also.
FIN
Senior Member
 
Posts: 826
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2001 12:00 am
Location: dublin

Postby phil » Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:24 pm

You forgot the shopping centre. I also think you are being a bit harsh on Stephens Court:)
phil
Old Master
 
Posts: 1467
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2003 12:32 pm

Postby GrahamH » Thu Feb 05, 2004 8:27 pm

Agreed - a very subtle and muted affair, Probably the only building in the city from that decade that took into consideration it's surroundings.

Also agree about Compustore - as far as I remember Frank McDonald and others raved over this building, why is beyond me as they look woeful in that white.
I think Lisney next door used to be green but was also painted white - they stand out like sore thumbs.
The Ardilaun Centre isn't that bad, it's the best brick built building from the 80s in the city.

All of the modern Georgians are rubbish, esp the one at the Leeson St corner, the bricks are terrible, the windows & stonework are terrible, and its 'dining room' window would be too small for an en suite toilet...
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Postby alan d » Fri Feb 06, 2004 2:46 pm

http://www.entertainment.scotsman.com/visual/reviews_specific.cfm?id=4554

Edinburgh's idea of contemporary architecture..........think you've got one just like it in Dublin, Diaspora
alan d
Senior Member
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 2:07 pm
Location: glasgow

Postby PVC King » Fri Feb 06, 2004 2:56 pm

Thats a good building, I prefer the Dublin one because it is simpler. I find the article interesting and the opinions refreshingly diverse.

It is only a pity that the newspaper isn't avialable here, since the solitary 'Scotsman' reader dissapeared last year giving a total Irish circulation figure of 0
PVC King
 

Postby alan d » Fri Feb 06, 2004 3:00 pm

Could'nt help it, she chucked me out............ Jeez Diaspora you really do know everything
alan d
Senior Member
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 2:07 pm
Location: glasgow

Postby PVC King » Fri Feb 06, 2004 3:07 pm

Far from knowing everything it was in the advertising & marketing section of the Irish Times, it struck me.

One meets many tams here and if the paddy trend is anything to go by it is hard to grasp as one sees Irish newspapers in most airports and it would not be uncommon to see five or six Irish times being read in a heathrow or Schipol departure lounge.

Whats the story with the Scots, they don't build modern buildings because they are too conservative and they don't read the Scotsman abroad because they are too progressive?
PVC King
 

Postby alan d » Fri Feb 06, 2004 3:25 pm

Well.......as I've told you before, Edinburgh is'nt really Scotland. Kinda more like Brigadoon with lawyers.

Glasgow has all the progressive stuff

It may be some consolation to know that only one copy of the Irish Times gets delivered here. Wonder to who? ............."coming dear"
alan d
Senior Member
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 2:07 pm
Location: glasgow

Postby phil » Fri Feb 06, 2004 6:29 pm

Originally posted by Graham Hickey

The Ardilaun Centre isn't that bad, it's the best brick built building from the 80s in the city.


which building is that Graham?
phil
Old Master
 
Posts: 1467
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2003 12:32 pm

Postby GrahamH » Fri Feb 06, 2004 8:26 pm

It's Eircom, on the corner of Cuffe St, or as some joker who meddled with the sign prefers, CUFFF St.
I think it's a clean, neat and streamlined building, accounting for the materials in the area, whilst not decending into pastiche or smothering sympathy - if that makes sense.

Although it could do without the railings along the top, that protect top brass entertaining business guests with views of the city over espressos, from falling over the edge.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Postby phil » Fri Feb 06, 2004 10:25 pm

Got you now. I know the one you are talking about, thanks

Phil
phil
Old Master
 
Posts: 1467
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2003 12:32 pm

Previous

Return to Ireland