South Great George's Street

Re: South Great George's Street

Postby soulsearcher » Wed May 01, 2013 3:22 am

Thanks Steven. I wish planners would use bullet points and a bit more page structure when drafting these development applications. The rambling unformatted descriptions with bizarre grammatical devices are so off putting. I bet the template hasn't changed much since the 1960s.
User avatar
soulsearcher
Member
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun May 02, 2010 10:20 pm
Location: Shanghai

Re: South Great George's Street

Postby StephenC » Thu May 02, 2013 2:05 pm

Its all driven by the nonsense that is 'the Validation Process'. Scandalously, since we emerged from the Celtic Tiger period where fortunes were made by site notice erection companies and newspapers charging €1,000s in some instances for notices, all at the behest of the bureaucracy, little if nothing has been done to being sense to this process.

Actually a prescribed form of site notice has only appeared since the P&D Act 2000. Despite asking for a 'brief description' of the development, validation officers have repeatedly pushed for more and more detail..all on this one page (hopefully A4). Hence the format.

Of course, there is evidence that this push to detailed site notices is not universal. I have regularly seen site notices in Jackie Healy Rae land that say simply: Brief description of the proposed development 'a house'. Tradition?

Needless to say, a more logical notice system applies in the UK. And there the Local Authority erects the notice.

If you would like to witness site notices gone made and contributing to the overall sense of urban neglect...then pay a visit to the HenryStreet - OConnellStreet - Moore Street site owned by Chartered Land.
User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2497
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Re: South Great George's Street

Postby StephenC » Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:09 pm

Dublin City Council - City Architects have published a new study on Aungier Street. One hope that there are some tangible actions arising from it.

AUNGIER STREET: Revitalising an Historic Neighbourhood


On Friday 23rd August at 3 p.m. as part of the Carmelite Community and Priory Gathering Weekend, the Lord Mayor Oisín Quinn will launch the Aungier Street Project Report.

The project is a pilot of the wider Dublin City Council Public Realm Strategy which recognises that condition, character and uses of the surrounding buildings can add to how the public experience the area. The publication sets out a number of recommendations and next steps to be undertaken in collaboration with local residents and businesses.

The project lists possibilities and ideas to stimulate change on Aungier Street, transforming it from a place to pass through into a destination, showcasing the value of its heritage and unique character and promoting economic regeneration. This urban project is innovative in approach - looking at things afresh, rethinking the ground-rules and proposing change for the better. This is an opportunity to reinvent a part of the city; to make the undervalued valued and the ordinary extraordinary.

The Lord Mayor Oisín Quinn says: “I want to compliment Dublin City Council, the Dublin Civic Trust and the Heritage Council for their work in producing this excellent Report. My view of Aungier Street will never be the same now that the splendid architecture of the buildings and the mansions has been drawn to my attention. This report makes us all see the street from a totally different perspective. I look forward to new initiatives taking place in the Aungier Street area over the coming years and the street going from strength to strength.”

Ali Grehan, City Architect with Dublin City Council, says “Although Aungier Street is often over-looked it is one of the great neighbourhoods in the historic core of Dublin and has a fascinating history. The Aungier Street project looks at revitalising the area by using its historic value as a district and its quality as a place to live in, work and visit.”

The street was laid out by Francis Aungier in 1661 through the former grounds of the Whitefriars monastery. Planning a street of this scale among the narrow lanes of the medieval city was a new departure. The grandeur of the street also gave rise to a new type of city mansion, several of which still survive to greater or lesser levels of intactness. These would have been the grandest houses in pre-Georgian Dublin and the known survivors are designated as both recorded monuments and pro­tected structures.

There is an exhibition about the architectural history of Aungier Street on display in the Whitefriar Centre for the gathering weekend and there will be a guided walk of the area at 1 p.m. on Friday 23rd August led by Pat Liddy and a walk on Saturday at 12 noon led by Dublin City Council architects’ division.

To view the Aungier Street Project report on line click on http://bit.ly/14ClvH2

ENDS

User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2497
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Previous

Return to Ireland