Cycling in Irish Cities

Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby SunnyDub » Fri May 08, 2009 4:10 pm

Yep, that cycle lane is quite bumpy as well.

Does anyone know if the new cycling strategy requires a new standard of cycle lane? Have they gone for on-road or off and white lines or concrete barriers, I'd be very interested to know. I suspect it's just the usual non-binding aspirational nonsense report after report that the government churns out by the bucket load, but maybe I'm wrong.
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby SunnyDub » Fri May 08, 2009 4:42 pm

Good piece in today's guardian

Cycling dangerous, on yer bike

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/may/08/cycling

I suspect SUVs and other large vehicles are the biggest dangers for cyclists, and the most disruptive vehicles on the street?
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby SunnyDub » Thu Jun 11, 2009 5:04 pm

ctesiphon wrote:I don't know if any shop here stocks either of these, but you could always treat yourself to a trip to Leipzig or Copenhagen. ;)

http://www.retrovelo.de/ (Review.)

http://velorbis.com/ (The Scrap Deluxe would get my vote- Review.)



Just had a look at those websites again, nice bikes, but I don't think you can order them online.

Any tips for Dublin bike shops with retro or cruiser bikes for sale?

I like this one,

http://www.gumtree.ie/dublin/86/32043586.html


Anyone know when the garda auction is on?
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Re: Cyclists deem new bridge ‘dangerous’

Postby PVC King » Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:03 pm

Kevin Street Garda Station - the lost property section on the right as you go in

Sarah McInerney
Dublin’s new Samuel Beckett bridge, which will form part of the government’s €10m cross-city cycle route, has been described as “dangerous, unusable and unacceptable” by a cycling lobby group.

The landmark €60m piece of infrastructure, which opened last week, is an integral part of a circuit that will link Rathmines and Fairview Park. When launching the 7km route in September, Noel Dempsey, the transport minister, said it would “open up the city” to cyclists and show that “cycling can be safe for everyone”.

However, the Dublin Cycling Campaign said after testing the course that the cycle lanes are of insufficient width and in some cases put cyclists in danger. The group also claims that many lanes stop without warning and much of the signage appears to be illegal.

“It’s just not usable,” said James Leahy, who tested the route for the cycling body. “You cannot use it safely or without breaking the law. This is meant to be a new flagship phase in cycle routes for the next generation, but in this case they have just repeated all the same mistakes of the past.”

Mike McKillen, chairman of Cyclist.ie, an umbrella group for Irish cycling campaigns, said the design of the facilities suggests they were an afterthought. “I suspect that when the bridge was designed it had no cycle lanes, and then last year Dempsey gave the city council €10m for the cycle route across the city,” he said.

“At that point it was too late. They couldn’t make the bridge wider, so they just put lanes in willy nilly wherever they could find the space. It really makes us despair. The engineers in Dublin city council just don’t get things right for cyclists.”

Leahy claimed the cycle lane on the east side of the bridge leads directly into oncoming traffic. The one on the west side has a “a very narrow cycle track on the footpath” which turns sharply on to the road, he added.

“These particular instances are actually quite dangerous,” Leahy said. “It would have been much better for the council not to draw out any cycle lanes and leave cyclists on the road.”

In a number of instances, the council has erected signs directing cyclists on to the footpath, which Leahy believes may be against the law.

“It is illegal to cycle on footpaths unless there is a designated cycle lane, and on one side of the bridge, there’s no cycle lane,” he said. “It’s meant to be a ‘shared space’ but that only works in an area where pedestrians and cyclists are taking their time. This is a commuter route where cyclists are likely to be going at high speed. This signage also is not in the Traffic Signs Regulations, so I would question its legality.”

Leahy said that even if the design does not break the rules, it is still unsuitable for cyclists to be on the pavement. “We’re constantly hearing calls from pedestrian groups to get us off the path, and we agree,” he said. “For elderly people it’s disconcerting to have cyclists zipping past in a blur, and it’s also been a big issue for the blind.”

Fionnuala Murphy, communications officer for the National Council for the Blind of Ireland, said the group is opposed to having cyclists on the pavement. “If you’re trying to navigate the city with a guide dog or a cane, it already takes a lot of concentration,” she said. “Trying to be aware of people flying past you at high speed just adds to the difficulty.”

A spokesman for Dublin city council said there was no case of a cycle track leading into oncoming traffic on the bridge and that the sign indicating shared pedestrian and cycle use was “being incorporated within the new Traffic Signs Manual”. The plan had always been to have cycle lanes on the bridge, he added.

“We would not accept the accuracy of all the points raised in relation to the bridge,” he said. “The cycle lanes have been designed in accordance with accepted national standards.”

Dempsey said he could not comment on the situation on the bridge but admitted there were substandard cycling facilities in urban areas. “One of the reasons I published Ireland’s first national cycle policy in April was because I recognised there were so many problems to be addressed before we could have a cycling culture,” he said.

Leahy and McKillen praised the principles set out in the policy, but said they were not in evidence on the bridge. “The policy has a hierarchy of what facilities should be put in place, and the introduction of cycle lanes is right down the bottom of the list,” Leahy said.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/ireland/article6962775.ece


As a pedestrian I think it looks great!!!
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby Devin » Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:20 pm

Discussion here with some 'luminaries' of cycling in Dublin - http://vimeo.com/12390413

Would like to have heard more from the DCC cycling bloke bout their immediate plans for making cycling easier in Dublin ...... seems to be leaning back there for most of the discussion - perhaps basking in the reflected glow (from A. Montague) of the success of the Dublin Bikes scheme. I heard a year ago that DCC were putting in much needed new bike locking stands in lots of points around the city. Where are they?? I haven't seen any yet. How long could it take to go and do this? There's such a dearth of them in some places it's ridiculous - egs. Smithfield, O'Connell Street, George's Street.

Also contra flow lanes desperately needed in several locations. This can be done without a redesign of the city. Shouldn't require lengthy coordination with city trffic engineers. Eg. if you're cycling from the cineplex end of Parnell St. to O'Connell Street, you have to do three sides of Parnell Square to get there.
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby Peter Fitz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 7:33 pm

http://www.waterwaysireland.org/index.cfm/section/article/page/1024GrandCanalGr

Grand Canal Way Opens :)

Fairly impressive cycle path running alongside the canal, 8.5km long, from Lucan to Inchicore. Better still, its flat, given that it runs alongside a canal and all ;)

I live in Park West and the number of people using it already for both cycling and recreation is really encouraging, you'd swear it was always there.
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby Devin » Fri Aug 20, 2010 12:19 pm

This website - http://www.dublincitycycling.ie/node/add/cycle - promised lots of sorely needed new bike-locking stands around the city a year ago. You clicked on the map to suggest a location. But none have yet been put in. What is the problem??

Smithfield is particularly woeful. There isn't a single bike-parking stand on the whole ginormous square. Black-framed spectacle wearers heading to an indy film in Lighthouse have nowhere to lock their bikes, except the tapered architectural grey lamps in the ante square which are all scuffed now due to this.




Image

Cyclists fight amongst each other for the solitary pole outside Fresh supermarket




Image

Please put some in urgently! as per here at Fresh, Grand Canal Basin.




Image

The only bike-locking in Smithfield at the moment is here in a quiet arse-end corner of the Smithfield Market scheme. Obviously the developers Fusano or others involved don't cycle because as every cyclist knows the first consideration for locking your bike in Dublin is a visible well-lit location with the passive security of good footfall.

Incredibly, these stands fall into blackness after dark. You may as well just go up to the tracksuit, hand him your bike and tell him that the tyres have a puncture resistant layer.

I would like to know just how many Spanish childminders, Asian English students etc. were introduced the hard way to Dublin life after innocently locking their bikes here in the 5 years since Smithfield Market was built .......... one of the worst bike-parking locations ever!


Hurry up with the new stands in Smiffy and around the city, DCC. Thousands wait.
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby adrian5987 » Fri Aug 20, 2010 2:23 pm

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0820/1224277229259.html
nationwide (except longford) cycle lanes! while there is a central fund the councils will be doing it themselves so dont expect it any time soon though, so cycltist will still be in the middle of the country roads afraid of what may be in the bank! and before anyone starts i cycle too but i still go mad at people (id say about a third) taking up dangerous positions given the twisty roads and the speed difference
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby PVC King » Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:40 pm

Dear PVC King,

I am writing to let you know that our cycling website has been updated. Additional information is now available on how to get the most out of cycling in the capital. This includes new short films showing other cyclists' experiences.

Information is also available on how to get started, cycle training, guided cycle rides and maps. Please visit tfl.gov.uk/cycling

The Mayor of London's Sky Ride is taking place on Sunday 5 September. It's free and family friendly. To register, please visit tfl.gov.uk/skyride


Yours sincerely,

Chris Mather
Head of Behaviour Change

No billboards just bikes
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby soulsearcher » Tue Aug 24, 2010 10:08 pm

I was scootering along on the north circular earlier today when an agressive cyclist flew past me shouting "get out of the cycle lane you ignorant @%$&*#" This is not the first time its happened to me as I would weave through rush hour traffic. I then witnessed the same polite righteous cyclist break 4 red lights in a row (I kept getting stopped at a red only to catch up with him shortly after). It really is jungle law out there.
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby onq » Wed Aug 25, 2010 7:48 pm

What sort of a scooter do you ride?

ONQ.
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby saintleger » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:04 pm

Has anyone spotted these cyclehoop thingies? Now in Dublin and Belfast apparently.
Retrofitted to lampposts, stops the bike falling over with one wheel in the traffic and one on the pavement, and makes it more secure to lock your bike to a bollard/post - it can't just be lifted over the top. http://www.cyclehoop.com/products/
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Re: Cycling in Irish Cities

Postby Devin » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:53 pm

Nice .. good idea.
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