Putting together the details.

Putting together the details.

Postby garethace » Fri Jan 30, 2004 10:04 pm

The millenium wing.

Surely this last stage of a design process is important, as one building here in Dublin has demostrated well.

Dunno if this really clean minimal concept was one to go for in a heavily used public environment, but it was an ambitious route to go anyhow. I also wonder how much experience in designing smaller, nice cool minimal interiors - stood to the designers of that building here in Dublin, when 'knowing how to put together' the materials and details, junctions etc at 1:20, 1:10 or 1:1 scale which make the National Gallery of Ireland extension the good buildling that it surely is.

Opinions?

BTW, I think this visualist has done a lot of work, in a similar vein, in terms of finish and detailing as the Benson and Forsythe building.
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Postby PVC King » Mon Feb 02, 2004 11:57 pm

I think it has given many a renewed confidence, and its not easy to design in this town due to the lack of really good comparibles to view day in day out.

There is no doubt that it has had some impression and that the building stock of good modern buildings are growing.

If you take walk around the mews lanes of inner Ballsbridge say Heytesbury and Pembroke lane. Analyse what was built during the 1970's through 1995 its twee crap in the main.

It is known in my locality that I am working for An Taisce, so whenever a planning application is lodged I am often asked to examine applications for older residents.

One application I objected to successfully involved the demolition of a mid terrace victorian house (4 bed) no question.

But increasingly lately I am struck by the quality of many planning applications.
Many architects are creating excellent contemporary designs with minimal impacts on their older neighbouring buildings. It is a great feeling to walk away from the civic offices impressed and able to tell worried people, 'actually this will increase the value of your home':p
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Postby garethace » Tue Feb 03, 2004 5:11 pm

True, and what surprises me is how many of those people are x-Bolton Street or UCD tutors, who wouldn't have been liked terribly or suceeded in doing very much in the way of improving things while at those institutions.

So it does tend to suggest, that the ideas of architectural education and how we learn as young architects - is not going to be solved by blaming staff. I am thinking here of some recent buildings by design strategies etc.

There is indeed hope there somewhere alright. I sometimes believe that the architectural profession should create a new branch, or qualification called 'architectural education' as distinct from architects per se.
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Postby notjim » Tue Feb 03, 2004 5:52 pm

i am worried about the millenium wing, the new coin collection box, though nice of itself, really shouldn't be there. something purpose designed, like the comment box, is clearly called for.
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Postby garethace » Thu Feb 05, 2004 2:50 pm

Originally posted by Diaspora

There is no doubt that it has had some impression and that the building stock of good modern buildings are growing.

If you take walk around the mews lanes of inner Ballsbridge say Heytesbury and Pembroke lane. Analyse what was built during the 1970's through 1995 its twee crap in the main.


One that grabbed my attention here:

http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=000188#000005
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Postby garethace » Thu Feb 05, 2004 3:02 pm

null
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