Anyone see the Patrick Scott Programme?

Anyone see the Patrick Scott Programme?

Postby garethace » Wed Jan 28, 2004 6:49 pm

Last night.

Seamus Heaney spoke about the Artist.

He said.

Scott's use of gold, steadied him and structured his paintings - there is something solid about a Scott painting - something right and well made about them.

Any opinions?

I like paintings myself, which interact with their space, and it seems to me that Scott is able to create paintings, tables, screens etc, which are like meditation elements within a good architectural space.

The proportions of the paintings are mm perfect too I think - he makes it look easy.
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Postby notjim » Wed Jan 28, 2004 11:46 pm

i went to the retrospective in the hugh lane, i really loved it, the gold paintings are so poised.
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Postby emf » Thu Jan 29, 2004 3:17 pm

Speaking of the Hugh Lane Gallery I read that the extension into the national ballroom is going out to tender soon!!
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Postby notjim » Thu Jan 29, 2004 11:14 pm

that's great news, it includes a sean scully room too! isn't the hugh lane collection great, such a mess.
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Postby GregF » Fri Jan 30, 2004 10:57 am

Saw the prog the other night....I prefer his later stuff ; the geometric paintings with the circles and spirals in gold and silver etc...evoking our Celtic past to his earlier daubings aka Franz Marc, Marc Chagall kinda stuff....Very good documentary on the man; he must be one of the last of the old Irish 20th century painters left . He seems to have had quite a priviledged and comfortable life too.
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Postby garethace » Fri Jan 30, 2004 6:17 pm

Originally posted by notjim
that's great news, it includes a sean scully room too! isn't the hugh lane collection great, such a mess.


Care to elaborate? I am sort of interested in public buildings, like galleries, libraries etc as building types - Kahn, of whom I am a fan, spent some time working on projects like those ones.

I prefer his later stuff ; the geometric paintings with the circles and spirals in gold and silver etc...evoking our Celtic past


On the other hand, they could evoke Arabic influences, where the surface of the wall becomes something more, they could be like CHinesse architecture where circles as openings were used to powerful effect, or Japanesse spaces, where 'learning to see without using the senses' is part of the philosophy.

I don't know about Celtic - what is Celtic? It was a mixture of things I am sure - but perhaps Celtic started in Arabia, parts of the world where Budism type believes were common.
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Postby notjim » Fri Jan 30, 2004 6:43 pm

Brian, i don't know so much about the building, but one important thing is that Sean Scully, the Irish born minimal expressionist has donated eight paintings to Dublin, which is great, but it presented a challenge in that they need a big room to display them, bigger than could be provided by the IMMA, stack a was suggest for a while, but now, the new Hugh Lane extension will have a room dedicated to Sean Scully and these painting will be on permanent display.

the hugh lane collection is a mess in the sense that it doesn't attempt to be encyclopedic, they just end up with these great things, the hugh lane impressionist paintings, the francis bacon studio and now the scullys
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Postby garethace » Fri Jan 30, 2004 6:57 pm

Right, and I passed out NGI today and saw a sign for Turner. That is the point I have been trying to make elsewhere - that in large public buildlings nowadays, you need to consider crowds of people, behaviours of people in galleries, a heck of a lot of walking to get there, and when you get there to walk around and actually see anything. I have cited the example of Steven Holl's Berlin LIbrary competition entry - a much bigger city/institution - and a very daring attempt to deal in some architectural fashion with the huge amount of movement, disorientation, and scale problem associated with large public buildings.

Notice how 'disused' the older part of the National Gallery of Ireland now has become. Look at our attempt at doing a Central Dubin Library in the Illac centre - look at our attempt at doing Libraries in general. An AAI lecture recently made the point though, that things like the Kunstal aren't designed to be around for very long. I mean, I think we could do a lot more as architects designing projects which are better to experience, but perhaps aren't built to last. Especially now, given that land values and sites are probably more valuable that the developments on them.

It is terrible when we take a very strategic site in Dubin somewhere and just build another huge concrete immoveable object, which will 'exist' on that site for hundreds of years to come, and long past its original functionality. I think one good way 'into' the architecture of Rem Koolhaas, would be to study the whole argument of public buildings in this way. His Library in Seattle for instance - isn't the grey, big great public institutional bunker that people would have felt entirely comfortable with - that their 'money' had gone to good civic use. But it does probably offer a nice 'new' Library, which might bring in new generations of 'readers' to do the function of what a Library is meant to do in the first place - i.e. to make the idea of reading happen in a cool, well lighted exciting space, that young people from all backgrounds might just bite at - not just become "a big, huge, grey, monolithic, but ultimately impersonal proper use of public funds".

Ditto, applies to smaller regional institutions - the Dooradoyle Library in Limerick by Burke, Kennedy, Doyle designed by Alan Begley I think, being a good example of what I mean. I would argue, how many more people is the new wing of NGI going to bring in, of people appreciating art, education etc. Just by the exciting nature of the spaces it created. Mind you the security guys walking around in uniforms are still as nasty.
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