New Urbanism.

Postby garethace » Mon Feb 02, 2004 10:56 pm

Nice inner suburban housing scheme here, designed in Aus somewhere.

http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=next_topic;f=4;t=000461;go=older

But this is more typical of the development in United States, where land values obviously must not be that high.

http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=next_topic;f=4;t=000432;go=newer

Now here is one that I picked out, which isn't inner city, inner suburban, but may be outer suburban, but is more lightly to be in Galway. Apart from the design, which is daft - I think the sizing and simple statement of the volume is appealing. But most of all, to notice the idea of siting any building at all, on this site, is interesting and pleasant in some 'folly' sort of way.

http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=next_topic;f=5;t=000456;go=newer

Just click the link and image will pop up. Steven Holl is one of the few guys who could pull off a site strategy like this effectively today I think.
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Postby FIN » Tue Feb 03, 2004 10:48 am

i like the two..1 in aus and the other in us... the third..i agree with u..it's daft but from only a render i will say that it may work...some derivation of the design and it could be workable. depends on the site. if it was sloped then u may get away with it...
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Postby garethace » Tue Feb 03, 2004 5:21 pm

Have a lot at some of the little houses designed by Meier in the 1970s and 1980s - he could manage to build in such as setting. But it takes confidence and design ability to do so.

Little Britain

30 minutes from London city centre - but like a different world - an area that just 'happened' around some old disused gravel pits. Land which 'might' some day become valuable for development - but at the moment, is just the space between factories, shopping centres and transport infrastructure.

Did anyone see the piece about 'Little Britain' and edgedom's in the BBC last night? The opposite to the 'planned environments' in Britain like Milton Keynes.

I mean, here in Britain and Ireland we don't have any policy to edgedoms, other than to 'control them' just because we like to control things. In Finland especially, i did notice a slightly different attitude to these marginal zones, where it is neither country nor city.

the point was made too - that building types and fauna can exist in 'edgedom' which couldn't exist in typical rural farming subsidised environments - where the cows are 'paid' to chew everything to death.

Whereas, to take the urban slant, these places mostly get fenced off, or simply become pitch and putt courses - i.e. brought into the city in some kind of acceptable way.

I guess, that was the approach taken when Bolton Street done some Dublin Docklands projects a few years ago now. Pity no publication or online resource was ever made available from that - i.e. like Fluid Space thing in UCD.

BTW too, on 'Fifth Gear' there was a segment about road rage - the antidote to road rage seemed to be walking around a pedestrian area of town - and asking road rage sufferers, why they do not get as angry when a pedestrian cuts them off etc.

Apparently the psychologist said, that the car in modern society is the number one murder weapon and that has indeed affected how we behave.

I really don't know about using Dublin city pedestrian walking to relieve rage though. :)
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Postby FIN » Tue Feb 03, 2004 6:50 pm

i am a definate canditate for road rage..i even get path rage...when ever someone is slow or cuts in front of me walking i mutter something very polite at them!
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Postby garethace » Tue Feb 03, 2004 11:14 pm

Odd good rendering here Fin,

http://www.g3d.net/

Notice just how much involved with nature, houses seem to get in different climates to the oceanic temperate one we live in.

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~wokka/FrameSet%20Arch.htm
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Postby FIN » Wed Feb 04, 2004 10:46 am

that's very true. being the fact that u don't get pissed on every time you go outside the door there it's much easier to have lots of pretty plants near instead of the dull evergreens we get plagueing houses here.
nice rendering alright.
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Postby garethace » Sat Feb 07, 2004 9:46 pm

typical one of wilderness development, driven by having cars, and lots of home entertainment, web access etc, in the USA.

If I get any more extreme rural developments, I will post them. I think some of these may work as retreat type places, like the ancient Cistercian monastery etc, but as new residential developments.... ?

Outer Suburbia?

same?

Open space as part of scheme.

Some things like this, have integrated well into places like Rathgar Road etc,I think.

Perhaps not pretty in some peoples' eyes, but definitely sustainable as development I think, on smaller available plots.

another one;

I dunno, how to calculate densities on FARs for this but, I think you get the idea.

And another attempt at density.

High density, low cost.

I think that Wright was very good at doing this sort of thing here.

Perhaps suitable for a number of smaller apartments nowadays on suitable site, circa Rathmines or similar? Certainly would be contextual anyhow.

Another kind of place,

sunnier,

Or here.

Or this.

Cross of ancient and modern at high densities. Kahn who first started trend in this.

Goind even further denser in FAR;

Similar idea.

We certainly haven't built like this in Ireland since the times of the Eucharistic congress!

This type of development, is attractive, as it actually manages to create a strong definition of a street I think.

Pastiche probably,but still good amount of accomodation packed in.

As this one does;

The sort of thing which drove Temle Bar development style.

Which, I believe was new at the time here in Ireland.

Docklands? Notice how elements like that bridge in the background, are important perceptual landmarks in such a place.

Handsome looking attempt at very high density.

Another one.
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Postby garethace » Mon Feb 09, 2004 11:00 pm

A good example of where geographers and architects might combine?

http://www.cgarchitect.com/gallery/image_spotlight.asp?galleryID=12673

Normally this kind of density is reserved for bad hotel developments here in Ireland. Which american firms of architects designed and had fine tuned down to the very last quarter of an inch. A quarter of an inch over size = less profit in other words.

But why do cities like paris, berlin, barcelona, amsterdam, london, helsinki etc manage these densities and we never can?
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Postby garethace » Wed Mar 17, 2004 4:09 pm

Top Ten Planning Issues of 2003 as per Planetizen online magazine.

California biased perhaps, where the magazine is located.

http://www.planetizen.com/oped/item.php?id=117
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Postby FIN » Fri Mar 19, 2004 1:20 pm

interesting but from what i read they just described the problem and didn't give any sort of answers to it. maybe i missed it and will read more when i have time
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Postby garethace » Sun Mar 21, 2004 5:46 pm

This is kinda new urbanism I think,

Very 'thoroughly' have shown all the roads and servicing for this project, mapped out in advance, or comissioning your architect to do some nice one-off house on a decent plot for you.

The way the golf course is weaved in between the planned development.

http://www.architectural-models.com/galrose.html
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Postby garethace » Sun Mar 21, 2004 5:50 pm

I think these shots are priceless, like a scene from the God Father, not a sign of a Rem Koolhaas anywhere, you couldn't miss that nose eh?

http://www.architectural-models.com/galfed.html
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Postby garethace » Thu Mar 25, 2004 9:24 pm

Thread spotted, might interest you'z:

http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?t=11230
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