millenium bridge damage

Postby Peter Fitz » Mon Sep 29, 2003 12:47 pm

just to clarify ... I think the flags themselves look great, esp. when looking up or down the river, the poles though are fairly scruffy at this stage.

The cheap lamp posts should be replaced, half of which don't work and the ones that do give out a miserable amount of light.
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Postby GregF » Mon Sep 29, 2003 12:49 pm

I used to detest those lights and flagpoles too along the quays......hoping that a more retro traditional style would be apt.....But not now; especially when Henry Street has been upgraded with a more contemporary style of street furniture as well as O Connell Street to follow suit (and also the upgrade of Capel Street bridge)
I think now that the lights and flagpoles are very apt and fitting.....maybe if the lights emitted more light...and colourful flags/bannners were hung from the flagpoles more often, it would be a marked improvement.
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Postby GrahamH » Mon Sep 29, 2003 7:56 pm

Of course they're fitting, they just need replacing, not because they're old, because they were crappy from the moment they went up.
London makes such an effort with it's bridges, and the lighting along the quays - all linked up with chains of twinkly lights, and Dublin is tiny in comparison.
Its hardly difficult to execute something attractive along Dublin's quays, especially considering that because its so small the improvements would be dramatic.
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Mon Sep 29, 2003 9:45 pm

Originally posted by Graham Hickey
Colinsky - the house isn't on a corner, it's set back a bit from the quay with a bit of scrub/park and a small road infront between it and the quay.
The facade at least - is late 18th century.


Is this it?
http://www.archeire.com/buildings_ireland/dublin/southcity/templebar/essex_quay/house.html

Currently starring as the priest's house in "Strumpet City" - but now a language school.
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Postby GrahamH » Tue Sep 30, 2003 12:00 pm

Spot on!

And what a distinguished pile it is - somewhat unusual in that it's detached - it really shows what conservation can contribute to a city.

I recongnise it as the priest's house now!

Poor old Henrietta St is'nt shown in its best light as 'Chandlers Court' in the programme, interesting to see how these houses were used as tenements though.
And the opening shot has a fantastic view of the long-lost St Georges Wren spire - indeed the first time I've seen it with the exception of an old photo.
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Postby GregF » Tue Sep 30, 2003 12:19 pm

The vandalism of the new bridge is disgraceful as well as the slack maintenance......but surely the grid surface should be easily replaceable as part of the design.
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Postby el architino » Tue Sep 30, 2003 4:37 pm

if people had listened to EL ARCHITINO in the first place instead of these howling harrignton characters, the milenium bridge would not be the disgrace presented to us today.
EL ARCHITINO's entry to the competition did not even make the shortlist due to the short-sighted-ness of the jury.
taking as its concept divine phenomenalogical experience and stopping the colloquial dublin "nacker" from wrecking the bridge, the structure manifests itself as a solid mass of brick wedged in the river. as it is an impervious mass through which no water may pass it also functions as a dam (should one be needed ).
each of the bricks would be made from diomands dipped in platinum covered with brick dust (showing EL ARCHITINO's interest in the unseen).

EL ARCHITINO demands that the current bridge be ripped down and this, more suitable structure be erected poste haste.
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Tue Sep 30, 2003 5:09 pm

rofl... love your drawings
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Postby el architino » Tue Sep 30, 2003 5:26 pm

EL ARCHITINO's linguistics department has informed him that the word rofl is not farmiliar to them..
EL ARCHITINO thanks you for the praise of his visuals but would remind you these are not simply drawings but a composite of maya, autocad, photoshop and many unreleased render plug-in packages which accentuate the photorealism of the images
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Postby Niall » Wed Oct 01, 2003 6:34 pm

Walked over the Millenium Bridge in London this morning, guy on a cleaner/mower chemically cleaning the hard metal walking surface and a guy walking in front sweeping debris up!!!

Now that's what I would call a clean.

Funny, as you approach it, there is a sign saying HSBC Bank gates, I wondered do they sponsor it and what a good idea if they pay for its upkeep?

I also notice they surface is way tougher than the Dublin one and no stupid lights underfoot, they are under the bridge and to its side, i.e PRACTICAL.
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Postby what? » Thu Oct 02, 2003 10:09 am

what a good idea, pity there is no such intelligence among the authorities here (although if we get el archatino elected things might happen!). i think dublin city council should sponser it since its thier job to clean it anyway.

i was walking across dublin's millenium bridge this morning and saw that a piece of chewing gum had almost fully covered up the hole in the deck! urban renewal irish style..
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Postby bluefoam » Thu Oct 02, 2003 11:20 am

Originally posted by Niall
I also notice they surface is way tougher than the Dublin one and no stupid lights underfoot, they are under the bridge and to its side, i.e PRACTICAL.


In my opinion, the great design elements are the modernisation of the Hlpenny Bridge concept. Though technology they have been able to reverse some of the traits of the original bridge, while maintaining a visable relationship. E.g. Where on the old bridge the lights needed to be structurally supported overhead, on the new one they are reversed and placed in the paving. The old bridge needed to have a high arched back in order to support itself, the new bridge has a more shollow arch due to advancements in material strenghts & manufacturing techniques.

I love the new bridge, it is a truely modern rendition of the original.
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Postby what? » Thu Oct 02, 2003 11:49 am

i also think that the bridge is a nice, sophisticated counterpart to the ha'penny(if a bit tame, and the curvey stone abutments are quite rancid) but this is not the point. the point is that the materials are not sufficiantly strong and some of the less obvious designing (relating to durability and cleanliness) has been overlooked.

as far as i am aware it was designed by howley harrington, is anyone posting from their office? is that unfair,would you like to stand up for the design maybe?
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Postby GrahamH » Thu Oct 02, 2003 7:05 pm

Whatever about the material underfoot, the design of this metal - ie it being ribbed - is silly, an inevitable dirt-trap.

The Ha'penny Bridge has been cleaned - should point it out considering the many complaints here of its condition just weeks after reopening.
The dirt is building already and could do with another in a few weeks.

Does anyone else find it astonishing the cheapness of the finish underfoot on the Ha'penny considering the tens of thousands spent on its restoration.
All that was done was bog-standard tarmac poured and concrete kerbs laid as steps.
Not even a coloured asphalt or similar material was used.
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Postby Harry » Mon Oct 06, 2003 11:04 am

Also on the subject of damage to bridges, has anyone seen the state of the James Joyce bridge lately?

The practice of climbing the arch now seems to be a thing of the past, but the benches are now occupied by groups of street drinkers most days. They have the place wrecked!. The whole of the pedestrian walkways are in dire need of a powerwash to rid the place of urine/vommit/godknowswhatelse.
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Postby what? » Mon Oct 06, 2003 3:06 pm

i say leave the bums there to enjoy their cans it'll be the only thing contextual about that bridge.

does anyone else think its a rediculously over the top structure for a span that size? it looks like they got another calatarava brige and used the stretch command on autocad to squash it into the space. it may be pretty to look at but i have a real problem with its flamboyance for the sake of it.

im not bashing calatarava, i think the larger bridge at macken street will look fabulous and be a genuine landmark for the city, but i think it may have been a rash decision to get another.
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Postby notjim » Mon Oct 06, 2003 3:13 pm

i didn't really get this bridge til i saw it coming down blackhall place in a taxi and from there the splayed form is very sexy.
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Postby dudley » Mon Oct 06, 2003 9:49 pm

I've always felt a little nervous going over that bridge on the bus 8)
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Postby sw101 » Tue Oct 07, 2003 12:58 am

you pervert jim(not)
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Postby what? » Tue Oct 07, 2003 10:14 am

maybe the form is a contextual reference to beutiful zooamorphical splayed forms which can often be found nearby on benburb street?
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Postby blue » Tue Oct 07, 2003 10:50 am

Someone was cleaning the millennium bridge this morning so maybe the DCC have read this thread. Mind you the guy was only using a scrapper to remove some stickers but it’s a start I suppose.

The DCC really have to understand that even new buildings and structures need constant maintenance from the word go to prevent them becoming run down and grubby. It’s also less costly in the long run.

I think the Jervis centre is a great example of how a building should be maintained. It constantly cleaned having little face-lifts here and there and it shows. It looks new compared to some of its Irish run contemporaries.
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Postby what? » Tue Oct 07, 2003 3:09 pm

the stickers are gone, theyve given an inch now lets take a mile. clean the whole city DCC!!!!
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Thu Oct 09, 2003 1:09 pm

From the Garda Press Office

"The Garda Mounted Unit do use the Millenium Bridge to meet operational requests on both sides of the river as required.

The issue of damage being caused to the bridge by Garda horses has not been officially raised with us by the relevant authorities.

If it is raised we will address the matter appropriately."
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Postby what? » Thu Oct 09, 2003 3:13 pm

typical beuracratic filth.

who are the relevant authorities? DCC? the president?

is anyone working in DCC who can maybe make it known that they are wrecking the bridge. i would be quite sure that it is the horses as some of the dints are in a circular shape around the same size as a horse shoe
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Postby bluefoam » Thu Oct 09, 2003 3:55 pm

The bridge should be able to take what traffic is required of it. This should have been taken into account when building the bridge. It is not fair to blame the Gardai for the damage, as their use of the bridge is quite reasonable.

The material specked should have been up to the task.
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