Bin Tax

Bin Tax

Postby GregF » Mon Sep 15, 2003 5:45 pm

Any hungers mothers out there who bleat on about the environment and the green party etc....yet they won't pay the bin tax even though they are working and well to do.
There is a waiver for those who are less well off, ie.....unemployed etc.....by the way!
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Postby d_d_dallas » Mon Sep 15, 2003 6:16 pm

Other parts of the country have a refuse charge (and have had it for years) with the annual stickers on the bins - and those without this years colour - do not get collected.
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Postby deza » Mon Sep 15, 2003 8:04 pm

I agree. Bin tax!!
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Postby sw101 » Mon Sep 15, 2003 11:25 pm

i heard some shit on the radio saying it is a tax on being alive. that by our very existence we must generate waste to survive. and anyway its those corporate bastards who triple wrap everythng in plastic, paper, and celophane.

i say shut up bee-atch and go buy some fruit from a market and carry it home in a hemp bag, and put any rind out to compost you wastrel little scrounger. then go wear some leaves and pluck paper bags from trees on o'connell street. mingy dirty little wastrel free-loading feckers with less than shit for brains and the morals and decency of chimps that hunt monkeys (go on david attenborough). go smoke yourself to death in your local for lunch tea and supper you fair city esque ratbag heathen. you contemptable example of our falteing irish blood line. you eejit. you short-sighted nympho. you slag. you cow.

pay your taxes. its you and me that pay berties wages. and if thats not an example of looking after your thrash then nothing is
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Postby notjim » Tue Sep 16, 2003 10:31 am

sure, we have to pay for it and it comes out of taxes, but why not out of income taxes. it is fair, progressive and easier to collect. why have a seperate revenue raising system for rubbish collection? it's silly and dangerous, once you link a councils income to the wealth of its inhabitants, you reinforce divisions in society. rubbish today, schools tomorrow. seperate fixed charges make no sense. unless you are metering, take the money out of income taxes.

sorry for the rant, but i find the whole thing so stupid.
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Postby bluefoam » Tue Sep 16, 2003 10:58 am

Ireland has the third lowest income tax rate in the developed world (according to John Bowman) it is up to you what you pay for after that. If you want a car you pay the associated charges, therefore I (who doesn't own a car) do not have to pay for the upkeep of the roads. Its the same with bin charges etc... why should everyone pay the refuse charge if they aren't creating the problem...

...& the argument that we all produce refuse is irrelevant.


Edited for spelling. (I blame the education system).
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Postby d_d_dallas » Tue Sep 16, 2003 11:21 am

This country is reaching crisis point in it's waste managment strategy (or lack of) - the concept of "polluter pays" is going to be more and more relevant. Example: tax on chewing gum. I fully support this - after seeing the destruction of the rejuevenated parts of Patrick's St in Cork after only ONE WEEK - so long as this tax goes totally towards the removal of chewing gum from the pavements of our city centres.
Staying in Cork: there's a pilot scheme that is set to be fully rolled out across the entire county. The County Council will install chips into the wheely bins - you pay a flat rate, plus a charge per kg waste therefter (the chip measures how heavy your waste is and is read by a scanner by the bin men). It was run in smaller towns in the west of the county and is very much a reality.

Alternatively we could all pay 65% income tax and zero VAT, VRT, DIRT etc etc etc...
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Postby anto » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:09 pm

Originally posted by d_d_dallas
This country is reaching crisis point in it's waste managment strategy (or lack of) - the concept of "polluter pays" is going to be more and more relevant. Example: tax on chewing gum. I fully support this - after seeing the destruction of the rejuevenated parts of Patrick's St in Cork after only ONE WEEK - so long as this tax goes totally towards the removal of chewing gum from the pavements of our city centres.
Staying in Cork: there's a pilot scheme that is set to be fully rolled out across the entire county. The County Council will install chips into the wheely bins - you pay a flat rate, plus a charge per kg waste therefter (the chip measures how heavy your waste is and is read by a scanner by the bin men). It was run in smaller towns in the west of the county and is very much a reality.

Alternatively we could all pay 65% income tax and zero VAT, VRT, DIRT etc etc etc...
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Postby anto » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:12 pm

woops sorry 'bout that last post. What I meant to ask was how does Patrick Street look now? Is it a success? or too early to tell.

As for the chewing gum, that was inevitable. We need to do a Singapore on that one I think and ban it.
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Postby bluefoam » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:16 pm

I hear that Singapore has reversed its ban on gum. The black market grew to heights never seen before it was made illegal and they lost alot of tax revenue.
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Postby StephenC » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:16 pm

I spent yesterday clearing out rubbish from the house and shed and then transporting it down to the DCC Bring Centre in North Strand and I was very impressed by the facility. Its organised, clean and staffed. All the waste they accept can be recycled or disposed of in a green way. In addition our house has a green bin and a weekely colection of other stuff (which halved once the green bin came along). Personally I think DCC have worked really hard to develop a sound collection system...its certainly miles better than the setup in the UK. Pay your bin charge and make use of the system and feel better for it!
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Postby d_d_dallas » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:39 pm

Singapore: I think it's only going on sale in pharmacies "for the treatment of oral conditions". But that's the kind of concession that spells the death knell for the ban there.

Patrick St: Not really for this thread, but what's done is to a very high standard - bike stands, bus stops, and esp the granite paving are all commendable. I'm reserving judgement on the lamps until they're all in, alone they look bizarre so I'll wait till I'm down South next time. If the O'Connell St paving follows suit (and from what I've seen it is) then things are looking up!
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Postby Rory W » Wed Sep 17, 2003 12:01 pm

All this talk of double taxation - you'd sware that none of the protestors bought anything with VAT on it
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Postby d_d_dallas » Wed Sep 17, 2003 3:24 pm

It's difficult to avoid any form of double taxation in this country - we are the masters of it: buy a car - pay VRT AND VAT.
Then register it, tax it, pay to sit a driving test, pay for the license itself... this could go on...
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