Restore Restore

Postby StephenC » Tue Sep 16, 2003 2:26 pm

I have to honestly say I reckoned Victoria Baths would get the award from the outset. Its such a telegenic choice - public facility, great for the kids, ancient swimming legend as a sponsor - not to mention it being in one of the largest cities which is itself currently geared up to renovation and restoration. As the Norfolk entry said: how can 35,000 inhabitants of Kings Lynn compete with Manchester! I think it was a worthy choice although you may be right about the city council tackling the project at some stage with or without the award.

It was heartening to hear the stories from some of the losers that the interest in their structures had rocketted since they were on TV. RESTORATION has at least given heritage in the UK some much needed headline space.
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Postby James » Tue Sep 16, 2003 7:21 pm

Newgrange is more of a 19th century 'reconstruction' than a restoration.

The point about restoration is that primary material is retained (eg: the building and its components), choosing teh Newgrange restoration whihc is a lovely piece of Disneyesque claptrap over Henrietta St which is still substantially intact would probably be a big mistake.

Mind you, on the other hand, there has'nt been a huge amount of damage done to the henrietta St houses apart from the removal of fire surrounds and the primary staircases (I think only about half of these survive).

The Dublin Corpo - Blitzkrieg approach to restoration always frightends me - the two wide streets commissioners houses on capel st were all but destroyed in their 'restoration' and the facade treatment certainly refers to no known render treatment in Dublin contemporary to such buildings.

If I had a choice wit hHenrietta St it would be to secure the external envelope, roofs, windows, etc, eradicate sources and causes of rising damp and dry rot and do nothing else!!.
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Postby Rory W » Wed Sep 17, 2003 11:55 am

Newgrange is more of a 19th century 'reconstruction' than a restoration.


Since Newgrange was restored in the 1960s I dont get your point?!?
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Postby GrahamH » Wed Sep 17, 2003 8:43 pm

It was archeologically (spelling) examined in the 19th century but was'nt 'reconstructed till the 60s - indeed it's value was noted in the 18th century.

The limestone 'cladding' in the central section is purposely a different material to the rest to make note of the fact that nobody knows what the front and 'roof box' (where the sun comes in) originally looked like, its guesswork.

It's extraordinary to come up to an international monument, and find it's main front looking like the facade of a bungalow blitz house, further added to by 60's balustrading over the entrance stone.
Its almost charming its so bizarre.
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Postby GrahamH » Wed Sep 17, 2003 8:44 pm

The best feature of Victoria Baths was the green ceramic balustrading on the stairs, fantastic.
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