Dublin Alley ways?

Dublin Alley ways?

Postby garethace » Tue Jun 17, 2003 8:51 pm

Some people regret the loss of certain pedestrian used 'ways and routes in the city'. I found this interesting discussion about the topic in American cities.

Alleys opinions?

http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7356&perpage=25&pagenumber=1
garethace
 
Posts: 1579
Joined: Wed May 14, 2003 9:01 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Postby sw101 » Wed Jun 18, 2003 12:28 am

seen too many crack heads shout at their crack hoes in kippy little alleyways around o'connell street to hold out much hope for their effective incorporation in the renewed urban fabric of dublin. thats got more to do with my opinions on scumbags than any like or dislike of narrow streetlets in cities.

the patrolling issue is an important one, as well as cleaning. are their any alleys in dublin that are well lit, oft frequented all day and night, and desirable and safe? connections around grafton street and stephens green spring to mind
sw101
 
Posts: 874
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2003 3:01 pm

Postby StephenC » Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:05 am

Good examples of alley-ways with a new lease of life are Dame Lane and Castle Lane both off Sth George Street. Smart new paving and better lighting has managed to attract busnesses and people and made for an interesting little thoroughfare.

Not an alley-way but a street with that feel is Sackville Place beside Clerys. Poor old street. Its a right dump but surprisingly it has quite a high footfall. It is in dire need of some development. That DCC Library has to go first and something needs to be done about Malborough Street. Isn't Malborough St just the sadest street in the city. There are so many excellent features on it: D of Education, Abbey, a Georgain terrace, etc and yet time has passed it by. Nothing to do with the Irish Life Centre ripping the soul out of it I'm sure.
User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2497
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Postby GregF » Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:16 am

I agree about Marlborough Street .....all the attractions yet it is one big piss pool.
It's always full of beggars, down and outs and alco's.....roaring and shouting at each other. I frequent the pubs and off licences here and see them all in all their drunken unrestrained glory. Very intimidating to tourists and natives alike. Not good for just a few feet away from our premiere street....and never a garda in sight either.
User avatar
GregF
Old Master
 
Posts: 1610
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2000 1:00 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Postby GrahamH » Wed Jun 18, 2003 7:13 pm

'Premiere street', good one!
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4590
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Postby garethace » Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:36 pm

"But just as the area's public space has degraded gradually over decades, its streets can be tamed incrementally, one block or one intersection at a time. . . "

I found this quote in an article i was reading only yesterday. I think that strategy would be a wise one for Irish towns and cities. If you look at it at this level, there are sometimes positive news, sometimes little victories like Dame Lane for instance.

I went 3 rounds with a whino there myself only last year!!! So i know its charm or lack thereof personally. I have known Dublin for ten years, and it has changed slowly, in little bits here and there. Young people growing up now, don't realise that at all.

What i am particularly interested in, is what has disappeared in time though. I.e. the very many laneways and routes commonly used in times past, which may appear on maps etc, but since have fallen prey to 'Mass Block development'.
garethace
 
Posts: 1579
Joined: Wed May 14, 2003 9:01 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Postby WhiteCube » Mon Jun 23, 2003 12:26 pm

Paris has pissoirs..Dublin has alleyways
WhiteCube
Member
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2002 1:00 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Postby doozer » Mon Jun 23, 2003 12:47 pm

Is pissoirs just the french for alleyways?

Actually it sounds alot worse.
doozer
Member
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2001 12:00 am
Location: dublin,ireland

Postby StephenC » Mon Jun 23, 2003 1:18 pm

A pissoir, as the name suggests, is a urinal.
User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2497
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Postby notjim » Mon Jun 23, 2003 1:53 pm

well its a outdoor urinal where the user (the pisser I guess) is visible from the waist up.
notjim
 
Posts: 1708
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2001 1:00 am
Location: Dublin

Postby doozer » Mon Jun 23, 2003 3:24 pm

nice
doozer
Member
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2001 12:00 am
Location: dublin,ireland

Postby ew » Mon Jun 23, 2003 4:48 pm

Did you ever see the "anti-pissoirs" on the custom house? They jut out just below waist height and slope down away from the building in each corner alcove on the street side. I heard they were there to discourage dockhands relieving themselves...
Is there an architectural term for these?
ew
Member
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2002 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Postby Rory W » Mon Jun 23, 2003 5:03 pm

They really are a great idea - they should install them in Temple Bar (along with a pavement that pukes back at you!)
Rory W
Old Master
 
Posts: 1331
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2000 12:00 am
Location: Drogheda & Blackrock

Postby notjim » Mon Jun 23, 2003 5:08 pm

and buildings that wear tinsel tiaras and show you their love handles . . .
notjim
 
Posts: 1708
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2001 1:00 am
Location: Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Tue Jun 24, 2003 8:17 pm

Is that what they are?!
I've wondered and pondered over those yokes on the Custom House for years and never coped on.
Brilliant!
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4590
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Postby garethace » Wed Sep 24, 2003 1:29 pm

What do you guys think of this notion?


It combines two traditional street designs: the conventional loop and cul-de-sac pattern of the modern suburb and the grid pattern from the early 1900s.

The traditional grid pattern provided efficient routes and "connectivity" for pedestrians and those travelling by horse and buggy. The loop and cul-de-sac pattern reduces the impact of traffic on a community.


Some more information here in PDF Format

Brian O' Hanlon.
garethace
 
Posts: 1579
Joined: Wed May 14, 2003 9:01 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland


Return to Ireland



cron